aluminium hot sheet rolling mill

reynolds metals aluminum sheet casting and rolling mill - fluor

Fluor's scope of work included complete engineering services, including architectural and process design, equipment specifications, instrumentation and environmental engineering along with building and equipment installation.

The 273,750-square-foot facility converts molten aluminum to coiled, cold-rolled aluminum sheet for shipment to Reynolds Metals Company foil plants. The 18-month, two-phase project included construction of a main plant building and support facilities on a 240-acre greenfield site.

Phase 1 consisted of approximately 153,000 square feet of the main plant, a railroad spur, water supply system, fuel oil storage facility, compressed air system, a recirculating cooling water system, electrical supply and distribution system, process gas systems, dross facility, parking lot and roads. The main building includes the cast house with three casting lines, cold rolling mill with motor and coolant rooms, roll grinder, coil storage, maintenance shop and offices.

In Phase 2, the area of the main building was increased by 120,750 square feet to a total of 273,750 square feet. The additional building area houses five additional continuous caster lines, a melting furnace and additional coil storage area, which enabled the plant to double the rolling mill speed. The capacity of the utility systems was also increased.

The cast house has eight lines for continuous casting of coiled aluminum sheet. The melting furnaces are 90,000-pound capacity, tilting reverberatory furnaces that are charged with molten metal and internally generated aluminum scrap. The 90,000-pound-capacity holding furnaces provide a continuous flow of alloyed molten aluminum to the roll sheet casters at a rate of 4,000 to 12,000 pounds per hour. After cooling, the aluminum coil is delivered to the single-stand, four-high cold rolling mill by a hydraulically actuated walking beam conveyor.

Construction for both Phase 1 and 2 was successfully completed in the 18-month schedule, which included construction of a main plant building, support facilities and infrastructure for the grassroots mill.

aluminium flat rolling_zhongwang group

Zhongwang imported its state-of-the-art equipment, including melting furnace, casting machine, pusher-type furnace, 1+1+4 hot rolling mill, 1+5 hot rolling mill, 100MN stretching machine, 39m plate aging furnace and 38m roller hearth quenching machine, three-rack and single-rack cold rolling mill, smart warehouse and various finishing equipment.

aluminum rolling process: part one :: total materia article

DataPLUS, a new module providing data subsets covering joints information, lubricants and coolants, material dimensions, tribology, and coatings information helps drive even more accurate material selections! Click here to see more.

Total Materia has allowed us to solve in a definite way all problems we had for the search of alternate materials in foreign countries. Thanks to Total Materia we have issued real "international" specs for purchase of steels in foreign countries.

The selection of aluminum for a specific use is normally in reaction to an ever increasing demand for an improved strength to weight ratio along with a number of other key property advantages. Rolled aluminum can be presented in several forms including sheets, plates and foils, and is used in many industries adding to the flexibility and its position as a critical material for modern applications.

Recent technological advancement in aerospace, automotive, marine, construction and leisure industries has made the demand for materials having high strength to weight ratio, high specific modulus, good corrosion resistance and good thermal conductivity to be on the increase. Aluminum and its alloys offer such combination of tremendous properties. The processing of aluminum alloys from casting to end product is associated with a large number of metallurgical phenomena. In order to further improve and optimize process routes and alloys, a thorough understanding of the thermo mechanical treatments by experimental observations and physically based modelling is necessary. Rolling is a mechanical process involved in many metals processing operations. Rolled aluminum products are essential materials for our daily life. Thick products are used as structural members for rail cars and aircraft, and thin products are used as packaging materials such as aluminum cans and aluminum foils. Rolled products, i.e. sheet, plate and foil constitute almost 50% of all aluminum alloys used. In North America the packaging industry consumes the majority of the sheet and foil for making beverage cans, foil containers and foil wrapping. Sheet is also used extensively in building for roofing and siding, in transport for airframes, road and rail vehicles, in marine applications, including offshore platforms, and superstructures and hulls of boats. Also, while relatively little is currently used in the manufacture of high volume production automobiles, it is expected that the next decade will see sheet used for both space frames and body panels, a market that could easily match the 2 million tons now used for beverage cans. Plate is used for airframes, military vehicles and bridges, ships superstructures, cryogenic and chemical vessels and as tooling plate for the production of plastic products. Foil applications outside packaging include electrical equipment, insulation for buildings, lithographic plate and foil for heat exchangers. Figure 1 presents the manufacturing processes of rolled aluminum products. Rolling equipment is roughly divided into three kinds; namely, hot rolling mills, cold rolling mills, and foil mills. Usually, rolling is performed by applying a load to the materials by forcing them vertically through a pair of work rolls. The work rolls are deformed by the high load during the rolling process. Consequently, the shapes of the rolled strips are distorted. In order to address this problem, one or more back up rolls are installed above and beneath each of the work rolls in order to curb the deformation. Figure 1: Aluminum rolling process

Recent technological advancement in aerospace, automotive, marine, construction and leisure industries has made the demand for materials having high strength to weight ratio, high specific modulus, good corrosion resistance and good thermal conductivity to be on the increase. Aluminum and its alloys offer such combination of tremendous properties.

The processing of aluminum alloys from casting to end product is associated with a large number of metallurgical phenomena. In order to further improve and optimize process routes and alloys, a thorough understanding of the thermo mechanical treatments by experimental observations and physically based modelling is necessary.

Rolling is a mechanical process involved in many metals processing operations. Rolled aluminum products are essential materials for our daily life. Thick products are used as structural members for rail cars and aircraft, and thin products are used as packaging materials such as aluminum cans and aluminum foils.

Rolled products, i.e. sheet, plate and foil constitute almost 50% of all aluminum alloys used. In North America the packaging industry consumes the majority of the sheet and foil for making beverage cans, foil containers and foil wrapping. Sheet is also used extensively in building for roofing and siding, in transport for airframes, road and rail vehicles, in marine applications, including offshore platforms, and superstructures and hulls of boats.

Also, while relatively little is currently used in the manufacture of high volume production automobiles, it is expected that the next decade will see sheet used for both space frames and body panels, a market that could easily match the 2 million tons now used for beverage cans. Plate is used for airframes, military vehicles and bridges, ships superstructures, cryogenic and chemical vessels and as tooling plate for the production of plastic products. Foil applications outside packaging include electrical equipment, insulation for buildings, lithographic plate and foil for heat exchangers.

Figure 1 presents the manufacturing processes of rolled aluminum products. Rolling equipment is roughly divided into three kinds; namely, hot rolling mills, cold rolling mills, and foil mills. Usually, rolling is performed by applying a load to the materials by forcing them vertically through a pair of work rolls. The work rolls are deformed by the high load during the rolling process. Consequently, the shapes of the rolled strips are distorted. In order to address this problem, one or more back up rolls are installed above and beneath each of the work rolls in order to curb the deformation.

Using the Advanced Search page, define the search criteria by selecting Aluminum in the Group of Materials pop-up list. It maybe that you need to further narrow the search criteria by using the other fields in the Advanced Search page e.g. Country/Standard.

cold rolling the aluminum sheet

for instance, aluminum sheet, which is used for the manufacture of beer cans, cold rolled sheet of thickness 2,5 mm to a thickness of 0,25 mm. This can be done for four or five passes through a single rolling stand, or in a single pass through a cluster rolling stand.

To the extent that, as the hardening - strain hardening - aluminum increases, more efforts are needed, to laminating sheet to reduce its thickness. Above a certain level of hardness of the metal begins to crack, if you do try compressing it further.

This imposes practical limits on the reduction of the sheet thickness by cold rolling, which can be achieved with a continuous series of passes. If further reduction of the sheet thickness, then it must be subjected to intermediate annealing for softening the metal, so that he could continue to cold rolling.

The degree of cold rolling, which can be achieved after (or without) annealing is calculated as follows, to a cold-rolled sheet was given properties - strength and / or plastic. This may be the final state of its material, or may require additional machining, for example, annealing, to achieve a given state of the material.

Although the sheet enters the rolling mill "cold" at room temperature, rolling friction and pressure can raise the temperature to 80 degrees Celsius or higher. This excess heat must be removed by an appropriate coolant, which can also play the role of lubrication.

For cold rolling cluster rolling stand - tandem mill - the same principles are valid, and that the cold rolled through a single roll stand. Tandem rolling mill gives some thickness reductions per pass and therefore easily outperforms single roll stand.

Length list, who wound up in a bay, It depends on the diameter of the bay and the sheet thickness. The coil with an inner radius 255 mm and an outer radius 1220 mm can accommodate 760 layers of sheet, rolled to a typical thickness 1,25 mm. One such bay comprise aluminum sheet longer than three kilometers. Workpiece for this sheet could be thick ingot 610 mm and length 7,3 m.

aluminum aluminum rolling mills - williamson ir

Aluminum sheet and plate products are used for a wide range of applications, including can stock, brazing, automotive and aerospace. These industries demand exacting tolerances and precise mechanical properties, particularly for new, technically challenging high-strength alloys. As a result, modern aluminum rolling mills demand previously unobtainable levels ofaluminum infrared temperature sensor accuracy for the control of rolling mill bite, pressure, speed, and coolant. To meet this need, Williamson offers two multi-wavelength infrared technologies able to provide the unprecedented accuracy this industry now demands for temperature readings throughout the hot rolling process.

Before heading to the rolling stands, a large ingot of aluminum is heated in a furnace for hours to days. Ingots need to be heated for this long of a time so they are completely heated through to the core so that the ingot can be rolled out into a longer strip without being reheated.

The ingot is soaked for such a long time to assure uniform temperature prior to rolling, and the soaking time is often extended due to process downtime. These extended soaking times often alter the emissive character of the aluminum even when the surface texture is reasonably consistent, and this is the primary reason why the Dynamic ESP Technology associated with the MWx pyrometer is required.

At the reversing mill, rolling speed, roll bite, and coolant flow may be optimized only with a precise real-time knowledge of metal temperature. The low and highly variable non-greybody emissivity character associated with this complex aluminum process dictates the use of the most sophisticated multi-wavelength infrared pyrometers as the material converts from a coarse ingot to a smooth strip.

The Williamson model MWx, designed specifically for the demanding aluminum hot reversing rolling mill application, uses the most advanced Multi-Wavelength Dynamic ESP Technology available for unequaled accuracy under all operating conditions.

Tight control of finishing temperature assures the desired mechanical properties and a blemish-free surface. The low and highly variable non-greybody emissivity character associated with this aluminum process dictates the use of multi-wavelength infrared pyrometers.

The traditional multi-wavelength (MW) technology works well at the finishing mill where the process is highly repeatable. While the temperature may vary from alloy to alloy, this variation is repeatable. For exceptional accuracy and repeatability across alloys, the MWx technology is required.

The temperature at the coiler is an important process parameter. If the temperature is too hot, then the metal may soften and stick. If the temperature is too cool, then the material may become too hard and crack. Hand-held thermocouple probes are notoriously inaccurate and are prone to misuse and interpretation.

The multi-wavelength pyrometer produces a much more repeatable and accurate temperature value than the traditional thermocouple. The pyrometer can be used to measure the temperature of the strip as it enters the coiler and/or measure the side of the coil while it is being wound or after it has been removed from the coiler.