crushing rate of cone crusher

crusher efficiency calculations

The following example demonstrates a method of selecting the components of an aggregate plant. Good component efficiency and part performance pre-evaluation is essential to a solid design. The aggregate production requires the consideration of several crushers, feeders and screens. This is not intended to be a typical situation, though it does involve common crusher and screen units often used in aggregate plants.

Quarry rock of 12 in. maximum size is to be handled in a two-stage crusher plant at the rate of 70 tons per hour. The maximum size of output is to be 1 in., and separation of materials over 1 in. size and the minus 1 in. in the output is required. Select a jaw crusher like those included in this table.

The screens to be considered are a 1-in. screen with an estimated capacity of 2.7 tph/sq ft and a 1-in. screen with a capacity of 2.1 tph/sq ft. The solution will include the selection of adequate and economical crushers for the two stages and the sizes of screens between them and below the secondary stage.

For the primary crusher a jaw crusher will probably be most economical. A jaw crusher, like 2036 in the Jaw Crusher Table here above, would be able to take the maximum 12 in. size quarry stone but it would not have the required 70 tph capacity needed. To have the needed capacity a jaw crusher like the 2042 or 2436 sizeswill have to be selected overloading the secondary crusher.

A grid chart or curve for the selected crusher shows that, for a 2-in. setting, 54% of the material will pass a 1-in. screen, or 46% will be retained (this is like Jaw Crusher capacity table abovewhere 48% passes a 1 in. screen). The 46% of 70 tph gives the 32 tph fed to the secondary crusher shown in Figure below as a roll crusher.

A twin-roll crusher is selected, like those given inthe Roll Crusher capacityTable above, to serve as the reduction crusher. The smallest, 24 x 16 roll crusher shown in theRoll Crusher capacity Table above has enough capacity with a setting of 1 in. but the maximum size feed will be too large, that is, the stage of reduction is not large enough. The maximum size of feed coming from the discharge of the primary crusher with a setting of 2 is about 3 in. as may be found in this Table.

Considering a 30-in. diameter roll crusher the maximum size particle that can be nipped with the roll crusher set at 1 in. according to this Equation is F = 0.085(15) + 1.0 = 2.28 in. <3 in. feed. It will take larger than a 40-in. diameter roll crusher. A better solution would be to use a larger jaw crusher set at 1 in., then a roll crusher from the Roll Crusher capacityTable above could be used. If the output of this crushing process should have less material of the +1-in. size, the larger crusher could be operated with a closed circuit. That is, the oversize in the output could be recirculated through the roll crusher without exceeding the rated capacity of the crusher. Then all material leaving that crusher with a 1-in. setting would be of a minus 1-in. size.

Another possible solution to this problem would be to use a gyratory crusher for the primary crushing stage. A gyratory like Telsmith model1110 could be set at 1 in. in an open circuit with a capacity for 260 tph. The maximum size of stone in the output is estimated to be approximately 2 1/8 in. Then all the output from the primary crusher could be nipped by a 40 in. diameter twin-roll crusher with a 1-in. setting according to the Roll Crusher capacityTable above. The specifications and manufactured limitations, rather than economy, generally govern the selection of crushers.

To find the required areas of screen, the rate of feed of material as well as gradation of the feed must be known. The 1-in. screen under the jaw crusher is the top deckno deck correction factor will be necessary. Therefore, the 1-in. screen will need to be at least 70/2.7 = 29.9 sq ft in area. It must be at least 36 in. wide for an 18 x 36 jaw crusher. So a 4-ft by 8-ft screen would be acceptable. The 1-in. screen is a second deck for the 38 tph from the jaw crusher, so the deck correction factor is 0.90 and that screen capacity is 2.1 x 0.9 = 1.89 tph/sq ft.

The screen area needed under the jaw crusher is 38/1.89 = 20.1 sq ft. For the 1-in. screen below the roll crusher the capacity has no correction factor and the area needed is 32/2.1 = 15.2 sq ft. To handle the output from a 40 x 24 roll crusher the screen will have to be at least 24 in. wide. Perhaps it will be more effective to use one continuous screen of at least 20.1 + 15.2 = 35.3 sq ft. A 4-ft by 10-ft 1 in. screen should be satisfactory.

cone crusher - an overview | sciencedirect topics

Cone crushers were originally designed and developed by Symons around 1920 and therefore are often described as Symons cone crushers. As the mechanisms of crushing in these crushers are similar to gyratory crushers their designs are similar, but in this case the spindle is supported at the bottom of the gyrating cone instead of being suspended as in larger gyratory crushers. Figure5.3 is a schematic diagram of a cone crusher.

The breaking head gyrates inside an inverted truncated cone. These crushers are designed so that the head-to-depth ratio is larger than the standard gyratory crusher and the cone angles are much flatter and the slope of the mantle and the concaves are parallel to each other. The flatter cone angles help to retain the particles longer between the crushing surfaces and therefore produce much finer particles. To prevent damage to the crushing surfaces, the concave or shell of the crushers is held in place by strong springs or hydraulics which yield to permit uncrushable tramp material to pass through.

The secondary crushers are designated as Standard cone crushers having stepped liners and tertiary Short Head cone crushers, which have smoother crushing faces and steeper cone angles of the breaking head. The approximate distance of the annular space at the discharge end designates the size of the cone crushers. A brief summary of the design characteristics is given in Table5.4 for crusher operation in open-circuit and closed-circuit situations.

The Standard cone crushers are for normal use. The Short Head cone crushers are designed for tertiary or quaternary crushing where finer product is required. These crushers are invariably operated in closed circuit. The final product sizes are fine, medium or coarse depending on the closed set spacing, the configuration of the crushing chamber and classifier performance, which is always installed in parallel.

For finer product sizes, i.e., less than 6mm, special cone crushers known as Gyradisc crushers are available. The operation is similar to the standard cone crushers, except that the size reduction is caused more by attrition than by impact [5]. The reduction ratio is around 8:1 and as the product size is relatively small the feed size is limited to less than 50mm with a nip angle between 25 and 30. The Gyradisc crushers have head diameters from around 900 to 2100mm. These crushers are always operated under choke feed conditions. The feed size is less than 50mm and therefore the product size is usually less than 69mm.

Maintenance of the wear components in both gyratory and cone crushers is one of the major operating costs. Wear monitoring is possible using a Faro Arm (Figure 6.10), which is a portable coordinate measurement machine. Ultrasonic profiling is also used. A more advanced system using a laser scanner tool to profile the mantle and concave produces a 3D image of the crushing chamber (Erikson, 2014). Some of the benefits of the liner profiling systems include: improved prediction of mantle and concave liner replacement; identifying asymmetric and high wear areas; measurement of open and closed side settings; and quantifying wear life with competing liner alloys.

Various types of rock fracture occur at different loading rates. For example, rock destruction by a boring machine, a jaw or cone crusher, and a grinding roll machine are within the extent of low loading rates, often called quasistatic loading condition. On the contrary, rock fracture in percussive drilling and blasting happens under high loading rates, usually named dynamic loading condition. This chapter presents loading rate effects on rock strengths, rock fracture toughness, rock fragmentation, energy partitioning, and energy efficiency. Finally, some of engineering applications of loading rate effects are discussed.

In Chapter4, we have already seen the mechanism of crushing in a jaw crusher. Considering it further we can see that when a single particle, marked 1 in Figure11.5a, is nipped between the jaws of a jaw crusher the particle breaks producing fragments, marked 2 and 3 in Figure11.5b. Particles marked 2 are larger than the open set on the crusher and are retained for crushing on the next cycle. Particles of size 3, smaller than the open set of the crusher, can travel down faster and occupy or pass through the lower portion of the crusher while the jaw swings away. In the next cycle the probability of the larger particles (size 2) breaking is greater than the smaller sized particle 3. In the following cycle, therefore, particle size 2 is likely to disappear preferentially and the progeny joins the rest of thesmaller size particles indicated as 3 in Figure11.5c. In the figures, the position of the crushed particles that do not exist after comminution is shaded white (merely to indicate the positions they had occupied before comminution). Particles that have been crushed and travelled down are shown in grey. The figure clearly illustrates the mechanism of crushing and the classification that takes place within the breaking zone during the process, as also illustrated in Figure11.4. This type of breakage process occurs within a jaw crusher, gyratory crusher, roll crusher and rod mills. Equation (11.19) then is a description of the crusher model.

In practice however, instead of a single particle, the feed consists of a combination of particles present in several size fractions. The probability of breakage of some relatively larger sized particles in preference to smaller particles has already been mentioned. For completeness, the curve for the probability of breakage of different particle sizes is again shown in Figure11.6. It can be seen that for particle sizes ranging between 0 K1, the probability of breakage is zero as the particles are too small. Sizes between K1 and K2 are assumed to break according a parabolic curve. Particle sizes greater than K2 would always be broken. According to Whiten [16], this classification function Ci, representing the probability of a particle of size di entering the breakage stage of the crusher, may be expressed as

The classification function can be readily expressed as a lower triangular matrix [1,16] where the elements represent the proportion of particles in each size interval that would break. To construct a mathematical model to relate product and feed sizes where the crusher feed contains a proportion of particles which are smaller than the closed set and hence will pass through the crusher with little or no breakage, Whiten [16] advocated a crusher model as shown in Figure11.7.

The considerations in Figure11.7 are similar to the general model for size reduction illustrated in Figure11.4 except in this case the feed is initially directed to a classifier, which eliminates particle sizes less than K1. The coarse classifier product then enters the crushing zone. Thus, only the crushable larger size material enters the crusher zone. The crusher product iscombined with the main feed and the process repeated. The undersize from the classifier is the product.

While considering the above aspects of a model of crushers, it is important to remember that the size reduction process in commercial operations is continuous over long periods of time. In actual practice, therefore, the same operation is repeated over long periods, so the general expression for product size must take this factor into account. Hence, a parameter v is introduced to represent the number of cycles of operation. As all cycles are assumed identical the general model given in Equation (11.31) should, therefore, be modified as

Multiple vectors B C written in matrix form:BC=0.580000.200.60000.120.180.6100.040.090.20.571.000000.700000.4500000=0581+00+00+000.580+00.7+00+000580+00+00.45+000.580+00+00+000.21+0.60+00+000.20+0.60.7+00+000.20+0.60+00.45+000.20+0.60+00+000.121+0.180+0.610+000.120+0.180.7+0.610+000.120+0.180+0.610.45+000.120+0.180+0.610+000.041+0.090+0.20+0.5700.040+0.090.7+0.20+0.5700.040+0.090+0.20.45+0.5700.040+0.090+0.20+0.570=0.580000.20.42000.120.1260.274500.040.0630.090

Now determine (I B C) and (I C)(IBC)=10.5800000000.210.42000000.1200.12610.27450000.0400.06300.0910=0.420000.20.58000.120.1260.725500.040.0630.091and(IC)=000000.300000.5500001

Now find the values of x1, x2, x3 and x4 as(0.42x1)+(0x2)+(0x3)+(0x4)=10,thereforex1=23.8(0.2x1)+(0.58x2)+(0x3)+(0x4)=33,thereforex2=65.1(0.12x1)+(0.126x2)+(0.7255x3)+(0x4)=32,thereforex3=59.4(0.04x1)+(0.063x2)+(0.09x3)+(1x4)=20,thereforex4=30.4

In this process, mined quartz is crushed into pieces using crushing/smashing equipment. Generally, the quartz smashing plant comprises a jaw smasher, a cone crusher, an impact smasher, a vibrating feeder, a vibrating screen, and a belt conveyor. The vibrating feeder feeds materials to the jaw crusher for essential crushing. At that point, the yielding material from the jaw crusher is moved to a cone crusher for optional crushing, and afterward to effect for the third time crushing. As part of next process, the squashed quartz is moved to a vibrating screen for sieving to various sizes.

Crushers are widely used as a primary stage to produce the particulate product finer than about 50100mm. They are classified as jaw, gyratory, and cone crushers based on compression, cutter mill based on shear, and hammer crusher based on impact.

A jaw crusher consists essentially of two crushing plates, inclined to each other forming a horizontal opening by their lower borders. Material is crushed between a fixed and a movable plate by reciprocating pressure until the crushed product becomes small enough to pass through the gap between the crushing plates. Jaw crushers find a wide application for brittle materials. For example, they are used for comminution of porous copper cake. A Fritsch jaw crusher with maximal feed size 95mm, final fineness (depends on gap setting) 0.315mm, and maximal continuous throughput 250Kg/h is shown in Fig. 2.8.

A gyratory crusher includes a solid cone set on a revolving shaft and placed within a hollow body, which has conical or vertical sloping sides. Material is crushed when the crushing surfaces approach each other and the crushed products fall through the discharging opening.

Hammer crushers are used either as a one-step primary crusher or as a secondary crusher for products from a primary crusher. They are widely used for crushing hard metal scrap for different hard metal recycling processes. Pivoted hammers are pendulous, mounted on the horizontal axes symmetrically located along the perimeter of a rotor. Crushing takes place by the impact of material pieces with the high speed moving hammers and by contact with breaker plates. A cylindrical grating or screen is placed beneath the rotor. Materials are reduced to a size small enough to pass through the openings of the grating or screen. The size of the product can be regulated by changing the spacing of the grate bars or the opening of the screen.

The feature of the hammer crushers is the appearance of elevated pressure of air in the discharging unit of the crusher and underpressure in the zone around the shaft close to the inside surface of the body side walls. Thus, the hammer crushers also act as high-pressure, forced-draught fans. This may lead to environmental pollution and product losses in fine powder fractions. A design for a hammer crusher (Fig. 2.9) essentially allows a decrease of the elevated pressure of air in the crusher discharging unit [5]. The A-zone beneath the screen is communicated through the hollow ribs and openings in the body side walls with the B-zone around the shaft close to the inside surface of body side walls. As a result, the circulation of suspended matter in the gas between A and B zones is established and the high pressure of air in the discharging unit of crusher is reduced.

Crushers are widely used as a primary stage to produce the particulate product finer than about 50100 mm in size. They are classified as jaw, gyratory and cone crushers based on compression, cutter mill based on shear and hammer crusher based on impact.

A jaw crusher consists essentially of two crushing plates, inclined to each other forming a horizontal opening by their lower borders. Material is crushed between a fixed and a movable plate by reciprocating pressure until the crushed product becomes small enough to pass through the gap between the crushing plates. Jaw crushers find a wide application for brittle materials. For example, they are used for comminution of porous copper cake.

A gyratory crusher includes a solid cone set on a revolving shaft and placed within a hollow body, which has conical or vertical sloping sides. Material is crushed when the crushing surfaces approach each other and the crushed products fall through the discharging opening.

Hammer crushers are used either as a one-step primary crusher or as a secondary crusher for products from a primary crusher. They are widely used for crushing of hard metal scrap for different hard metal recycling processes.

Pivoted hammers are pendulous, mounted on the horizontal axes symmetrically located along the perimeter of a rotor and crushing takes place by the impact of material pieces with the high speed moving hammers and by contact with breaker plates. A cylindrical grating or screen is placed beneath the rotor. Materials are reduced to a size small enough pass through the openings of the grating or screen. The size of product can be regulated by changing the spacing of the grate bars or the opening of the screen.

The feature of the hammer crushers is the appearance of elevated pressure of air in the discharging unit of the crusher and underpressure in the zone around of the shaft close to the inside surface of the body side walls. Thus, the hammer crushers also act as high-pressure forced-draught fans. This may lead to environmental pollution and product losses in fine powder fractions.

A design for a hammer crusher (Figure 2.6) allows essentially a decrease of the elevated pressure of air in the crusher discharging unit [5]. The A-zone beneath the screen is communicated through the hollow ribs and openings in the body side walls with the B-zone around the shaft close to the inside surface of body side walls. As a result, circulation of suspended matter in the gas between A- and B-zones is established and high pressure of air in the discharging unit of crusher is reduced.

For a particular operation where the ore size is known, it is necessary to estimate the diameter of rolls required for a specific degree of size reduction. To estimate the roll diameter, it is convenient to assume that the particle to be crushed is spherical and roll surfaces are smooth. Figure6.2 shows a spherical particle about to enter the crushing zone of a roll crusher and is about to be nipped. For rolls that have equal radius and length, tangents drawn at the point of contact of the particle and the two rolls meet to form the nip angle (2). From simple geometry it can be seen that for a particle of size d, nipped between two rolls of radius R:

Equation (6.2) indicates that to estimate the radius R of the roll, the nip angle is required. The nip angle on its part will depend on the coefficient of friction, , between the roll surface and the particle surface. To estimate the coefficient of friction, consider a compressive force, F, exerted by the rolls on the particle just prior to crushing, operating normal to the roll surface, at the point of contact, and the frictional force between the roll and particle acting along a tangent to the roll surface at the point of contact. The frictional force is a function of the compressive force F and is given by the expression, F. If we consider the vertical components of these forces, and neglect the force due to gravity, then it can be seen that at the point of contact (Figure6.2) for the particle to be just nipped by the rolls, the equilibrium conditions apply where

As the friction coefficient is roughly between 0.20 and 0.30, the nip angle has a value of about 1117. However, when the rolls are in motion the friction characteristics between the ore particle will depend on the speed of the rolls. According to Wills [6], the speed is related to the kinetic coefficient of friction of the revolving rolls, K, by the relation

Equation (6.4) shows that the K values decrease slightly with increasing speed. For speed changes between 150 and 200rpm and ranging from 0.2 to 0.3, the value of K changes between 0.037 and 0.056. Equation (6.2) can be used to select the size of roll crushers for specific requirements. For nip angles between 11 and 17, Figure6.3 indicates the roll sizes calculated for different maximum feed sizes for a set of 12.5mm.

The maximum particle size of a limestone sample received from a cone crusher was 2.5cm. It was required to further crush it down to 0.5cm in a roll crusher with smooth rolls. The friction coefficient between steel and particles was 0.25, if the rolls were set at 6.3mm and both revolved to crush, estimate the diameter of the rolls.

It is generally observed that rolls can accept particles sizes larger than the calculated diameters and larger nip angles when the rate of entry of feed in crushing zone is comparable with the speed of rotation of the rolls.

Jaw crushers are mainly used as primary crushers to produce material that can be transported by belt conveyors to the next crushing stages. The crushing process takes place between a fixed jaw and a moving jaw. The moving jaw dies are mounted on a pitman that has a reciprocating motion. The jaw dies must be replaced regularly due to wear. Figure 8.1 shows two basic types of jaw crushers: single toggle and double toggle. In the single toggle jaw crusher, an eccentric shaft is installed on the top of the crusher. Shaft rotation causes, along with the toggle plate, a compressive action of the moving jaw. A double toggle crusher has, basically, two shafts and two toggle plates. The first shaft is a pivoting shaft on the top of the crusher, while the other is an eccentric shaft that drives both toggle plates. The moving jaw has a pure reciprocating motion toward the fixed jaw. The crushing force is doubled compared to single toggle crushers and it can crush very hard ores. The jaw crusher is reliable and robust and therefore quite popular in primary crushing plants. The capacity of jaw crushers is limited, so they are typically used for small or medium projects up to approximately 1600t/h. Vibrating screens are often placed ahead of the jaw crushers to remove undersize material, or scalp the feed, and thereby increase the capacity of the primary crushing operation.

Both cone and gyratory crushers, as shown in Figure 8.2, have an oscillating shaft. The material is crushed in a crushing cavity, between an external fixed element (bowl liner) and an internal moving element (mantle) mounted on the oscillating shaft assembly. An eccentric shaft rotated by a gear and pinion produces the oscillating movement of the main shaft. The eccentricity causes the cone head to oscillate between the open side setting (o.s.s.) and closed side setting (c.s.s.). In addition to c.s.s., eccentricity is one of the major factors that determine the capacity of gyratory and cone crushers. The fragmentation of the material results from the continuous compression that takes place between the mantle and bowl liners. An additional crushing effect occurs between the compressed particles, resulting in less wear of the liners. This is also called interparticle crushing. The gyratory crushers are equipped with a hydraulic setting adjustment system, which adjusts c.s.s. and thus affects product size distribution. Depending on cone type, the c.s.s. setting can be adjusted in two ways. The first way is by rotating the bowl against the threads so that the vertical position of the outer wear part (concave) is changed. One advantage of this adjustment type is that the liners wear more evenly. Another principle of setting adjustment is by lifting/lowering the main shaft. An advantage of this is that adjustment can be done continuously under load. To optimize operating costs and improve the product shape, as a rule of thumb, it is recommended that cones always be choke-fed, meaning that the cavity should be as full of rock material as possible. This can be easily achieved by using a stockpile or a silo to regulate the inevitable fluctuation of feed material flow. Level monitoring devices that detect the maximum and minimum levels of the material are used to start and stop the feed of material to the crusher as needed.

Primary gyratory crushers are used in the primary crushing stage. Compared to the cone type crusher, a gyratory crusher has a crushing chamber designed to accept feed material of a relatively large size in relation to the mantle diameter. The primary gyratory crusher offers high capacity thanks to its generously dimensioned circular discharge opening (which provides a much larger area than that of the jaw crusher) and the continuous operation principle (while the reciprocating motion of the jaw crusher produces a batch crushing action). The gyratory crusher has capacities starting from 1200 to above 5000t/h. To have a feed opening corresponding to that of a jaw crusher, the primary gyratory crusher must be much taller and heavier. Therefore, primary gyratories require quite a massive foundation.

The cone crusher is a modified gyratory crusher. The essential difference is that the shorter spindle of the cone crusher is not suspended, as in the gyratory, but is supported in a curved, universal bearing below the gyratory head or cone (Figure 8.2). Power is transmitted from the source to the countershaft to a V-belt or direct drive. The countershaft has a bevel pinion pressed and keyed to it and drives the gear on the eccentric assembly. The eccentric assembly has a tapered, offset bore and provides the means whereby the head and main shaft follow an eccentric path during each cycle of rotation. Cone crushers are used for intermediate and fine crushing after primary crushing. The key factor for the performance of a cone type secondary crusher is the profile of the crushing chamber or cavity. Therefore, there is normally a range of standard cavities available for each crusher, to allow selection of the appropriate cavity for the feed material in question.

The main task of renovation construction waste handling is the separation of lightweight impurities and construction waste. The rolling crusher with opposite rollers is capable of crushing the brittle debris and compressing the lightweight materials by the low-speed and high-pressure extrusion of the two opposite rollers. As the gap between the opposite rollers, rotation speed, and pressure are all adjustable, materials of different scales in renovation construction waste can be handled.

The concrete C&D waste recycling process of impact crusher+cone crusher+hoop-roller grinder is also capable of handling brick waste. In general, the secondary crushing using the cone crusher in this process with an enclosed crusher is a process of multicrushing, and the water content of waste will become an important affecting factor. The wet waste will be adhered on the wall of the grinding chamber, and the crushing efficiency and waste discharging will be affected. When the climate is humid, only coarse impact crushing is performed and in this case the crushed materials are used for roadbase materials. Otherwise, three consecutive crushings are performed and the recycled coarse aggregate, fine aggregate, and powder materials are collected, respectively.

The brick and concrete C&D waste recycling process of impact crusher+rolling crusher+hoop-roller grinder is also capable of handling the concrete waste. In this case, the water content of waste will not be an important affecting factor. This process is suitable in the regions with wet climates.

The renovation C&D waste recycling process of rolling crusher (coarse/primary crushing)+rolling crusher (intermediate/secondary crushing)+rolling crusher (fine/tertiary crushing) is also capable of handling the two kinds of waste discussed earlier. The particle size of debris is crushed less than 20mm and the lightweight materials are compressed, and they are separated using the drum sieve. The energy consumption is low in this process; however, the shape of products is not good (usually flat and with cracks). There is no problem in roadbase material and raw materials of prefabricated product production. But molders (the rotation of rotors in crusher is used to polish the edge and corner) should be used for premixed concrete and mortar production.

rock crushing rule of thumb

Gyratory crusher: feed diameter 0.75 to 1.5m; reduction ratio 5:1 to 10:1, usually 8:1; capacity 140 to 1000 kg/s; Mohs hardness <9. More suitable for slabby feeds than jaw crusher. [reduction by compression].

symons cone crusher

For finer crushing or reduction a Symonscone crusher the norm. Symons are commonly used for secondary, tertiary or quaternary crushing. They do this by a different chamber design which is flatter and by operating at about twice the rotational speed of a primary type gyratory crusher.

One of the first cone crushers had a direct drive vertical motor mounted above the spider with the drive shaft passing through the hollow bored main shaft. With relatively high speeds of 480 to 580 rpm and small eccentric throw, the machine produced a uniform produce with minimum fines.There are numerous Symonscone crusher manufacturers of modern crushers each promoting some unique aspect.

The Allis Chalmers Hydrocone selling point is its adjustability and tramp protection through a hydraulic support system for the headcentre. By merely adjusting the oil reservoir below the head centre the crusher setting can be changed while in full operation. Tramp metal causes a surge of pressure in this hydraulic system which is absorbed through relief valves and gas-bladder-filled accumulator bottles which allow the headcentre to momentarily drop and return to its normal operating position when the tramp has fallen through.

The Symons or Rexnord spring cone crusher is adjusted by spinning the bowl up or down manually or through hydraulic rams. A series of powerful springs give the necessary tramp protection. Several other manufacturers produce similar types and sizes of crushers but all follow the basic types described.

When the Symons brothers Invented the cone crusher, they employed the principle wherein the length of the crushing stroke was related to the free fall of material by gravity. This permitted the material being crushed to fall vertically in the crushing chamber; and in effect, caused the particles to be crushed in a series of steps or stages as the particles got smaller due to the crushing action. This also helps to reduce the rate of wear of the liners since the sliding motion of the particles is minimized.

Recognizing that the Symons principle of crushing is the most efficient means of ore and aggregate reduction in hard rock applications, the engineers used this same principle in the design on the hydrocone.

Versatility in the form of having the ability to perform in a wide range of applications without the need for a change in major assemblies was another objective in the design. Ease of maintenance and remote setting capability also were part of the design parameters the market requires.

There is no startling revelation to the fact that the mining industry as a whole is generally moving toward the use of larger equipment to process ores in quantities far greater than what was even considered a decade ago. Trucks and shovels have led the way in extra large machines and many other manufacturers have followed suit in the development of so-called supers in their line of equipment.

In order to keep pace with the industry, crusher manufacturers have also enlarged the size of their equipment. There is now on the market, a Gyratory crusher capable of accepting a 72 diameter piece of ore. Primary jaw crushers have also increased in size. It is inevitable, therefore, that larger secondary cone crushers would also be required to complement the other equipment used to process these large quantities of ore. This super-size secondary cone crusher is the SYMONS 10 Ft. Cone Crusher.

Until 1973, the largest cone crusher built was the 7 Ft. Extra Heavy Duty crusher, which is currently used in the majority of the mining operations throughout the world. The 10 Ft. crusher, when compared to the 7 Ft. Extra Heavy Duty Crusher, is approximately 1 times larger in physical dimensions; three times heavier; will accept a maximum feed size which is approximately twice as large; and will crush at approximately 2 times the rate of the 7 Ft. machine at identical closed side settings. It will be the largest cone crusher built in the world.

The conclusions of this investigation were all positive the crusher could be built and at a cost that would be in line with its size and capacity and also with other size crushers. After that preliminary study, the project became dormant for several years.

The project was reactivated and this time general assembly drawings were made which incorporated many improvements in the crusher such as pneumatic cylinders in place of the conventional, springs for tramp iron release, a two-piece main frame a dynamically balanced design of the internal moving parts of the crusher, and an automatic clearing and adjusting mechanism for the crusher. At this stage of development we felt we were ready to build a 10 Ft. crusher for any mine that was willing to try one. Unfortunately, the conservative posture of the mining industry did not exactly coincide with our sales plans. This, added to the popularity of the autogenous mill concept at the time, led to another lull in the 10 Ft. development program.

The project was reactivated again in 1970, this time primarily at the request of one of the large Minnesota Iron Range mining companies. We then undertook a comprehensive market research study to determine if there was a need for this size crusher by the mining industry in general, rather than just the iron ore industry. We talked not only to the iron ore people but to the copper people and persons connected with the other metallic ores as well. The acceptability of this large crusher was also discussed with the aggregate industry. After interviews with many of the major mining companies, the decision was made to complete the entire engineering phase of the development program and to actively solicit a customer for this new crusher. We spent approximately $85,000 on engineering work and tests on the gamble that we could find a customer. I speak of a gamble because during our market research study we continually were told my company would be very interested in buying a 10 Ft. crusher, but only after we have seen one in operation.

The actual building and test of the first prototype unit without a firm commitment for a sale was an economic impossibility. We were now at the point where we needed to sell at least one unit in order to prove not only the mechanical reliability of the machine, but the economic justification for its purchase as well. Needless to say, when the order for two SYMONS 10 Ft. cone crushers was received, we felt we were now on the way toward completion of the development program.

Perhaps at this point it might be apropos to examine the crusher itself. It will stand 15-6 above its foundation, the overall height will be 19-4-. At its greatest diameter, in the area of the adjustment ring, it will be approximately 17-6. It will weigh approximately 550,000 lbs. Under normal crushing conditions, the crusher will be connected to a 700 HP motor. A 50 ton. overhead crane is required to perform routine maintenance on this crusher.

The main shaft assembly will weigh approximately 92,000 lbs. and the bowl assembly approximately 95,000 lbs. The mantle and bowl liner, cast from manganese steel, will weigh approximately 13,000 lbs. and 25,000 lbs. respectively.

The throughput capacity of the Standard will be approximately 1300 TPH at a 1 closed side setting and 3000 TPH at a 2- closed side setting. The throughput capacity of the SHORT HEAD will be approximately 800 TPH at closed side setting and 1450 TPH at a 9/16 closed side setting.

Persons familiar with the design of a conventional 7 Ft. SYMONS cone crusher will recognize that the design of the 10 Ft. is quite similar to it. As a matter of fact, we like to say that the design of the 10 Ft. is evolutionary rather than revolutionary, because all the reliable features of the SYMONS cone crusher were retained and the only changes that were made were those that added to the convenience of the operator, such as automatic clearing and automatic adjustment. From a mechanical point of view the stresses generated due to crushing loads are less in the 10 Ft. crusher than in the existing 7 Ft. Extra Heavy Duty cone.

One of our senior engineers who has long since retired told me that he had the occasion many years ago to make a presentation of a newly designed crusher to a prospective customer. He carefully prepared a rather detailed description of the crusher which included all the features that his new machine had when compared to the customers existing machine. The presentation itself took about one hour and after that period the customer leaned back in his chair and said, Thats all well and good, but will it crush rock? In effect, the customer was; saying that all the features in the world were of no use to him if the crusher did not perform its basic function to crush rock and ultimately make profits for the owner. Using todays financial terminology he was asking the engineer to economically cost justify the purchase of the crusher.

The working day of the contemporary manager or project engineer evolves around making decisions to economically justify a piece of equipment or a new operation. In our development program of the 10 Ft. cone crusher, we felt that the economic justification, from the customers point of view, was just as important to develop as the engineering aspects of the program. So we developed a three-part program to examine the economics of installing a 10 Ft. crusher. First we talked in wide generalities concerning the use of a 10 Ft. crusher. Secondly, we discussed the ramifications of using a 10 Ft. crusher versus 7 Ft. crushers in a completely new plant being considered for the future. Thirdly, we examined how a 10 Ft. crusher could be used to its best advantage in a plant that is being expanded.

The first consideration was the economic generalities of installing the crusher, or more specifically, what questions regarding the installation are pertinent to every crushing plant. Usually, the initial comparison which is made between a 7 Ft. crusher and a 10 Ft. crusher is that of price versus capacity. Theoretically, the capacity of a 10 Ft. crusher is 2 times that of a 7 Ft. while the selling price is approximately 3 times that of the 7 Ft. On that basis alone, it would appear that the 10 Ft. could not be justified. However, this is an incomplete picture. Recent cost estimates show that considerable savings are realized when the entire physical plant structure is considered. Because fewer machines are required to crush an equivalent amount of ore, the size of the buildings can be reduced, thereby decreasing the capital investment of buildings and allied equipment used as auxiliaries for the crusher.

Total manpower requirements to operate and maintain the plant is another of the generalities which were considered. Fewer crushers normally require less personnel to operate and perform maintenance, Manpower requirements obviously play a large part in the profitability of a plant. Therefore, it follows that using a 10 Ft. in place of multiple 7 Ft. units should be more profitable from the standpoint of manpower. We should, however, clarify one point regarding normal maintenance of the 10 Ft. crusher which is commonly misunderstood; namely, the periodic changeout of manganese liners in the crusher. The normal time period between manganese changes would not be significantly different between the 7 Ft. and a 10 Ft. because the wear rate, that is, the pounds of liner worn away per ton of ore crushed, will remain the same. Consequently, if a set of liners in a 7 Ft. crusher, lasted six weeks, a 10 Ft. crusher in the same operation would also last approximately six weeks. However, since the total amount of ore crushed will be greater, the maintenance costs per liner changeout will be less on the 10 Ft. crusher.

Another point for consideration is that the 10 Ft., cone crusher is a secondary crusher and normally would be fed with the product of a gyratory crusher. Since the 10 Ft. can accept a larger feed than a 7 Ft. crusher, it is possible to increase the open side setting of a gyratory crusher, thereby, allowing a greater volume of feed to pass through the crusher. Because of this, it is conceivable that a smaller primary crusher could be used in order to obtain a given quantity of ore.

A good salesman could expound on a multitude of ideas for using 10 Ft. crushers in place of 7 Ft. crushers in a new plant, but in the final analysis, the deciding factor as to whether or not the 10 Ft. crushers should be used will be the anticipated over-all plant capacity. Several studies have indicated that as a general rule of thumb the break even point for using 10 Ft. crushers in place of 7 Ft. crushers is a plant which will have an overall ore treatment capacity of approximately 40,000 TPD or approximately 8,000,000 TPY. Anything less than that figure should indicate the use of conventional 7 Ft. crushers. Obviously a small four stage crushing plant in which the third stage crusher was a 7 Ft. Standard and the fourth stage consisted of two 7 Ft. SHORT HEAD cone crushers, would not improve economically by the use of one 10 Ft. Standard cone crusher and one 10 Ft. SHORT HEAD cone crusher in place of the 7 Ft. crushers.

A study was made which considered a plant to be built using three different approaches of a conventional crushing-grinding operation. The plant which was being considered would be crushing taconite similar to that found in the Iron Range. The end product of the crushing was 5/8 rod mill feed and in this example the plant capacity was to be approximately 13.5 million TPY of ore processed to eventually produce approximately 4 million TPY of iron ore pellets. The study arbitrarily chose a four-year period of operation so that operating costs would be included and also because a four-year period is the usual comparison basis for calculating return on investment. In this example the primary crusher as well as the fine crushing plant would be operated fourteen shifts per week.

In our economic analysis of the 10 Ft. crusher development program, we also studied how this crusher could be used to best advantage when planning expansion of an existing plant. Before delving into the actual dollars and cents of several variations of expansion plans, several preliminary questions must be answered in the affirmative:

Since each plant is unique, the relative merits of the 10 Ft. crusher must be examined on an individual plant basis. Again, as a general rule of thumb, it has been found that the most benefit can be achieved in those plants which presently contain a four-stage crushing plant in which the first two stages of crushing are gyratory crushers. Studies have shown that converting the second stage gyratory crusher to a 10 Ft. Standard crusher shows most potential because the major auxiliaries required for the crusher, such as crane, conveyors, etc., are already large enough to accommodate the increased capacity of the 10 Ft.

As one possible solution, we suggested that the two 30 x 70 secondary gyratory crushers be replaced by two 10 Ft. Standard cones. These crushers could then send approximately 3600 TPH of minus 3 material to the fine crushing plant. The two existing 7 Ft. Standard crushers could be converted easily to SHORT HEAD crushers and two new 7 Ft. SHORT HEAD crushers added to the existing vacant foundations.

In Summary, we feel that the Symons cone crusher has a very definite place in the future of the mining industry and we intend to move steadily ahead with its progress. However, we have learned a few lessons along the way.

Initially, the development of these super size machines is an extremely expensive proposition. We know that if our company alone, attempted to completely design, manufacture, erect, and test a machine in this size range, it would severely tax our financial resources.

We found that super size equipment also presents some problems for our manufacturing facilities. The manufacture of one of these units puts a large dent into the production schedule of many of the smaller conventional units. In our enthusiasm to build a bigger newer machine, we continually remind ourselves that the smaller conventional units are still our bread and butter units.

On the positive side, we found that our reputation as a crusher manufacturer was enhanced because of what our customers refer to as progressive thinking. We listened to the suggestions of the mining industry in attempting to give them what they wanted.

Perhaps you will allow me to close with a bit of philosophizing from a manufacturers point of view. The 10 Ft. crusher is here ready to go into operation. Where do we go from here? A 15 Ft. cone crusher? A 20 Ft. cone crusher? Who knows? We do know that we have reached the financial limit of a development program on a machine of this size. We also know that as the size of a machine grows larger, the developmental and manufacturing risks grow larger along with it and any allowable margin for error must be minimized. We, like you, are in business to make a profit. Since larger crushers usually mean a fewer number of crushers, we must examine the profit picture from aspects of the sale. I think I speak for other manufacturers as well when I say that bigness in machines reflects bigness in development costs as well. If the mining industry wants still larger equipment in the future, the industry should prepare itself to contribute to the development program of those machines.

A multi-cylinderHydraulic Cone Crusher, theHydrocone Cone Crushercan be used in either the second or third stage of crushing by merely changing liners and adaptors.It can produce the full product range that the combination of a comparable sized Standard and Short Head can produce. It makes the machine much more versatile. It allows for much more standardization. The value of this feature is one where spare parts investment in the form of major assemblies is minimized.

All operator controls are conveniently mounted on a remote control console to eliminate the need for an operator to approach the crusher during operation.Over a period of years we have developed a unique engineering knowledge about the effects of cone crusher design parameters such as speed, throw and cavity design on crusher productivity.

Each Hydrocone Cone Crusher features dual function hydraulic cylinders that provide overload protection and a safe and fast way to clear a jammed cavity. Should the crusher become plugged, the operator merely pushes levers on the remote control console to clear the cavity.

It can produce the full product range that the combination of a comparable sized Standard and Short Head can produce. It makes the machine much more versatile. It allows for much more standardization. The value of this feature is one where spare parts investment in the form of major assemblies is minimized.

All operator controls are conveniently mounted on a remote control console to eliminate the need for an operator to approach the crusher during operation.Over a period of years we have developed a unique engineering knowledge about the effects of cone crusher design parameters such as speed, throw and cavity design on crusher productivity.

Each Hydrocone Cone Crusher features dual function hydraulic cylinders that provide overload protection and a safe and fast way to clear a jammed cavity. Should the crusher become plugged, the operator merely pushes levers on the remote control console to clear the cavity.

TheHydraulic Cone Crusheruses hydraulic tramp release cylinders and accumulators to hold the adjustment ring against the main frame seat. There is only one angular surface between the main frame and the adjustment ring which also has a radial contact point in the lowermost area. When a piece of tramp goes through the crusher, the oil is forced into the accumulators allowing the adjustment ring to raise and pass the tramp.

The tramp release cylinders are secured to the adjustment ring and the lower portion of the main frame through clevises. This allows the crushing forces to be transferred directly from the frame arm locations to the adjustment ring. This relieves the main frame shell and upper flange from carrying heavy loads.

The Hydraulic Cone Crusher is equipped with hydraulic clearing. The tramp release cylinders which hold the adjustment ring in place are double acting cylinders. These cylinders can be pressurized in the opposite direction, after the clamping pressure has been released, to raise the adjustment ring and bowl assembly for clearing; only the weight of the adjustment ring, clamp ring, and bowl assembly, plus any residual material in the bowl hopper raises.

cone crushers | mclanahan

A Cone Crusher is a compression type of machine that reduces material by squeezing or compressing the feed material between a moving piece of steel and a stationary piece of steel. Final sizing and reduction is determined by the closed side setting or the gap between the two crushing members at the lowest point. As the wedge or eccentric rotates to cause the compression within the chamber, the material gets smaller as it moves down through the wear liner as the opening in the cavity gets tighter. The crushed material is discharged at the bottom of the machine after they pass through the cavity.

A Cone Crusher will deliver a 4:1 to 6:1 reduction ratio. As we set the closed side setting tighter to create a finer output, we also reduce the volume or throughput capacity of the machine. Generally speaking, multiplying the closed side setting by two is a good guide to the top size of the gradation exiting the machine.

The technology that makes a MSP Cone Crusher outperform competitive cones on the market is the combination of all of the factors of performance i.e. balanced eccentric, higher speeds, fulcrum point position, and stroke. By using sound engineering with years of field testing a truly tried and tested new Cone Crusher has emerged.

A balanced eccentric coupled with a fulcrum point ideally placed over the crushing chamber yields highly effective compression crushing. This allows higher eccentric speeds to maximize performance without disruptive forces. The eccentric stroke is designed to work with the eccentric speed and fulcrum position to produce higher yields and minimize recirculating loads. The torque and resultant crushing forces are as effective as virtually any Cone Crusher on the market.

Spiral bevel gears provide the turning force to the eccentric. The spiral gear is mounted on a sturdy countershaft of the Cone Crusher, which rides in bronze bushings. The gears are precision cut for quiet operation. Misalignment problems are eliminated.

The MSP Cone Crusher features one of the largest volume displacements by a crusher head. When there is a large volume of material displaced this way, it means that more material is crushed in each cycle, more material can be fed to fill the larger void left when the crushing head recedes, and more material flows through the crusher due to the larger throughput and gyrating cycles allowing material to drop further. The benefits of high efficiency, greater crushing force and high capacity coupled with the durability the market expects are the reasons why this design is the best way to increase your productivity and profitability.

Sleeve bearings make removal and installation of the MSP Cone Crusher head and main shaft simple. The tapered main shaft fits into a large opening at the upper end of the tapered eccentric bushing. The shaft does not require precise alignment. It can be inserted from a vertical position and will self-align.

With the MSP Cone Crushers automatic hydraulic overload relief system, the crusher immediately opens in the event of an overload. This action reduces the crushing pressure, allowing the obstruction to pass through the chamber. After the chamber has been cleared, the hydraulic control system automatically returns the crusher to its original setting. Shock loads on the crusher are reduced for longer component life.

MSP Cone Crushers are built to make your operations run more smoothly and easily. Its simple and easy to read control panel provides you with the necessary information to properly run your crusher. For example, the MSP Cone Crusher shows you the exact cone setting to allow the operator to stay on top of a critical set point.

To enhance your Cone Crusher's life and maintain optimal crushing capacities, an automatic liner change reminder is included for your convenience. When the new mantle and liners are installed, the automated reminder is reset. As the crusher operates, the system will track production capacities and calculate the liner wear rate. When the cone liners reach the maximum wear point, it sends a flashing reminder to 'change cone' on the cone setting meter. After the wear parts are changed, simply reset the automated reminder system and continue efficient, reliable crushing.

The MSP Cone Crushers are built heavier than most competitive Cone Crushers. The extra weight means lower stress on the machine, which results in longer operational life. There is no question that the proper use of mass makes for more durable crushers. Additionally, a broad array of manganese liners is offered for each size MSP Cone. A unique and patented feature allows the Liners to fit without the use of any backing material. Improved Chamber matching with crusher feeds virtually eliminates any trial and error.

All these factors combine to give producers more effective compression crushing. This reduces liner wear, which reduces wear cost and allows higher yields, resulting in decreased overall cost per ton of finished product.

In the Symons principle, which is utilized by the MSP Cone Crusher, each cycle is timed so that the feed material and the upward thrust of the crushing head meet at the moment of maximum impact. The optimum speed of gyration and the large eccentric throw produce two important results: 1) the rapidly closing head catches the falling feed material and delivers the extremely high crushing force and 2) on the other side of the chamber the rapidly receding head allows material to fall freely to the next point of impact or exit the chamber. The combination of superior crushing force and free flow of material in the MSP Cone Crusher results in production levels that are unsurpassed and means lower power consumption per ton.

Ten years of testing went into the final combination of speed, stroke, and head angle to deliver the most efficient use of power. Greater efficiency delivers lower power consumption, reduced cost per ton, less maintenance and higher profits.

The power input imparted by the driven eccentric results in a bearing force in opposition to the crushing force at a point on the lower portion of the main shaft. The bearing force as it is transmitted to the main shaft provides the required moment to crush the rock. The distance between the bearing force and the fulcrum point is called the force arm. The longer the force arm, the greater the momentum, which produces a greater crushing force.

Crushing loads are distributed over a large spherical bearing. The socket liner keeps full contact with the crushing head ball and carries all of the vertical component and part of the horizontal. The long force arm, represented by the main shaft, reduces the load transmitted through the eccentric bushing.

Capacities and product gradations produced by Cone Crushers are affected by the method of feeding, characteristics of the material fed, speed of the machine, power applied, and other factors. Hardness, compressive strength, mineral content, grain structure, plasticity, size and shape of feed particles, moisture content, and other characteristics of the material also affect production capacities and gradations. Gradations and capacities are most often based on a typical, well-graded choke feed to the crusher. Well-graded feed is considered to be 90% to 100% passing the closed side feed opening, 40% to 60% passing the midpoint of the crushing chamber on the closed side (average of the closed side feed opening and closed side setting), and 0 to 10% passing the closed side setting. Choke feed is considered to be material located 360 degrees around the crushing head and approximately 6 above the mantle nut. Maximum feed size is the average of the open side feed opening and closed side feed opening.

Minimum closed side setting may vary depending on crushing conditions, the compressive strength of the material being crushed, and stage of reduction. The actual minimum closed side setting is that setting just before the bowl assembly lifts minutely against the factory recommended pressurized hydraulicrelief system.

Overall, industry acceptance of the Symons principle and performance, the McLanahan Cone Crusher works to deliver lower recirculating loads at higher tonnage rates with lower maintenance costs by combining:

A general rule of thumb for applying Cone Crushers is the reduction ratio. A crusher with coarse style liners would typically have a 6:1 reduction ratio. Thus, with a 34 closed side setting, the maximum feed would be 6 x 34 or 4.5 inches. Reduction ratios of 8:1 may be possible in certain coarse crushing applications. Fine liner configurations typically have reduction ratios of 4:1 to 6:1.

The difference between the volume displaced by the crushing head when it is fully closed and fully open is called the displacement volume. A large displacement volume results in greater capacity because:

In order to maintain the maximum levels of capacity, gradation, and cubical product, a Cone Crusher must be choke-fed at all times. The best way to keep a choke-feed to the ConeCrusher is with a surge bin (or hopper) and feeder that are located prior to the crusher. Choke-feeding is almost impossible to achieve without a hopper and feeder.

There are a number of different criteria to consider when selecting the right chambers for your crushing needs. However, the one that must always be considered isthat you have a well-graded feed to the chamber. A well-graded feed is generally thought to be 90 to 100% passing the closed-side feed opening, 40 to 60% passing the midpoint, and 0 to 10% passing the closed-side setting.

One thing you should never do is place a new concave liner in a crusher with a worn mantleor place a new mantle in a crusher with a concave liner. Why? If you have properly selected the replacement component, you will change the complete profile of the Cone Crusher by mating new and worn components. The receiving opening will tend to close down, restricting the feed from entering the chamber and causing a reduction in tons per hour.

If the liner is wearing evenly throughout the chamber, you should consider changing out the manganese when it has worn down to about 1" (2.5 cm) thick at the bottom. At about 3/4" to 5/8" (1.9 to 1.6 cm) thick, the manganese will crack, causing the backing material to begin to disintegrate. This, in turn, will cause the liners to break loose. If this should happen, continued operation could destroy the seat on the support bowl or the head of the Cone Crusher.

McLanahan Symons Principle (MSP) Cone Crushers utilize a combination of improved factors of performance, which are enhanced by the Symons Principle of crushing, as well as the latest hydraulic features and electrical features that create a modern, efficient, reliable and durable Cone Crusher that ultimately leads to a faster ROI. MSP Cone Crushers are designed to make your operation run more smoothly and easily, as well as ensuring lower operating costs and minimal downtime so that MSP Cone Crushers are more frequently fully operational and processing optimal amounts of material.

Efficiency can be defined by the ratio of the work done by a machine to the energy supplied to it. To apply what this means to your crusher, in your reduction process you are producing exactly the sizes your market is demanding. In the past, quarries produced a range of single-size aggregate products up to 40 mm in size. However, the trend for highly specified aggregate has meant that products have become increasingly finer. Currently, many quarries do not produce significant quantities of aggregate coarser than 20 mm; it is not unusual for material coarser than 10 mm to be stockpiled for further crushing.

high crushing ratio gyratory cone crusher price for quarry project - best stone crusher plant solution from henan dewo

Dewo machinery can provides complete set of crushing and screening line, including Hydraulic Cone Crusher, Jaw Crusher, Impact Crusher, Vertical Shaft Impact Crusher (Sand Making Machine), fixed and movable rock crushing line, but also provides turnkey project for cement production line, ore beneficiation production line and drying production line. Dewo Machinery can provide high quality products, as well as customized optimized technical proposal and one station after- sales service.

Crusher plant is a complete aggregate crushing processing, which can be divided into the jaw, impact, cone crushing plant, portable mobile crushing station, quarry crushing plant. Crushing materials that include rock, puzzolana, gravel, limestone, coal, iron ore, construction and demolition wastes, and other mineral raw materials.

Impact Crusher Manufacturer, Vertical Crusher, Quarry VSI Crusher Price manufacturer / supplier in China, offering High Capacity Sandstone/Aggregate/Quarry VSI Crusher Equipment, Large Capacity Steel Slag Cone Crusher for Iron Ore, Newest Technology Cone Crusher Stone Crusher Price and so on.

Cone crushers, slow-operation size reduction machines, are perfectly suited to produce cubic particle or to reduce heat-sensitive materials or very . stone crusher 60 to 100 tonnes per hour Stone crusher chile 300tons an hour. crusher run with capacity of 100 tonnes. ton per hour quarry plant, mineral processing plant 15 to 60 tons per hour jaw

Mobile Jaw Crushing Machine. The mobile stone crusher machine offers a crusher output of up to 400 t/h. High capacity and a good crushing ratio are ensured by the jaw crusher that boasts a high-quality steel structure for long life, together with a modular, bolted design for reduced metal fatigue and greater reliability. Mobile Impact Crushing ...

Stationary quarry crushing plants for primary crushing are built around the proven jaw and impact crusher concepts. Based on a revolutionary modular, non-welded frame construction, the S cone crusher offers superior strength, reliability and many different mounting options even in the most demanding mobile applications.

Cone crushers are built with a rotating mantle in a concave bowl lined with manganesethis is similar to gyratory crushers, but the crushing chamber in cone crushers is not as steeply angled. Cone crushers can accept medium-hard to very hard and abrasive feeds that might be dry or wet, though not sticky (whereas gyratory crushers are better ...

Cost Of 50 Ton Jaw Crusher In Pakistan. Power consumption of a jaw crusher when idling is about 50 of full load for a gyratory it is approximately 30 source richard taggart the crushers rock breakers Ton Per Hour Crusher Prices Pakistan 150 tons per hour river stone crushing plant home projects 150 tons ...

The more you know about the aggregate you wish to crush along with its end use the easier it will be to select the best equipment to achieve project goals. 1. Jaw crushers. In compression crushing, jaw crushers tend to be more of a blunt instrument compared to cone crushers. This is why jaw crushers are often used in the primary circuit ...

p&q university lesson 7- crushing & secondary breaking : pit & quarry

In the quarry, crushing is handled in four potential stages: primary, secondary, tertiary and quaternary. The reduction of aggregate is spread over these stages to better control the product size and quality, while minimizing waste.

The primary stage was once viewed merely as a means to further reduce stone following the blast or excavation prior to secondary crushing. Today, primary crushing is viewed as more important within the balance of production and proper sizing needs. The size and type of the primary crusher should be coordinated with the type of stone, drilling and blasting patterns, and the size of the loading machine. Most operations will use a gyratory, jaw or impact crusher for primary crushing.

In the secondary and subsequent stages, the stone is further reduced and refined for proper size and shape, mostly based on specifications to produce concrete and asphalt. Between stages, screens with two or three decks separate the material that already is the proper size. Most secondary crushers are cone crushers or horizontal-shaft impact crushers. Tertiary and quaternary crushers are usually cone crushers, although some applications can call for vertical-shaft impact crushers in these stages.

A gyratory crusher uses a mantle that gyrates, or rotates, within a concave bowl. As the mantle makes contact with the bowl during gyration, it creates compressive force, which fractures the rock. The gyratory crusher is mainly used in rock that is abrasive and/or has high compressive strength. Gyratory crushers often are built into a cavity in the ground to aid in the loading process, as large haul trucks can access the hopper directly.

Jaw crushers are also compression crushers that allow stone into an opening at the top of the crusher, between two jaws. One jaw is stationary while the other is moveable. The gap between the jaws becomes narrower farther down into the crusher. As the moveable jaw pushes against the stone in the chamber, the stone is fractured and reduced, moving down the chamber to the opening at the bottom.

The reduction ratio for a jaw crusher is typically 6-to-1, although it can be as high as 8-to-1. Jaw crushers can process shot rock and gravel. They can work with a range of stone from softer rock, such as limestone, to harder granite or basalt.

As the name implies, the horizontal-shaft impact (HSI) crusher has a shaft that runs horizontally through the crushing chamber, with a rotor that turns hammers or blow bars. It uses the high-speed impacting force of the turning blow bars hitting and throwing the stone to break the rock. It also uses the secondary force of the stone hitting the aprons (liners) in the chamber, as well as stone hitting stone.

With impact crushing, the stone breaks along its natural cleavage lines, resulting in a more cubical product, which is desirable for many of todays specifications. HSI crushers can be primary or secondary crushers. In the primary stage, HSIs are better suited for softer rock, such as limestone, and less abrasive stone. In the secondary stage, the HSI can process more abrasive and harder stone.

Cone crushers are similar to gyratory crushers in that they have a mantle that rotates within a bowl, but the chamber is not as steep. They are compression crushers that generally provide reduction ratios of 6-to-1 to 4-to-1. Cone crushers are used in secondary, tertiary and quaternary stages.

With proper choke-feed, cone-speed and reduction-ratio settings, cone crushers will efficiently produce material that is high quality and cubical in nature. In secondary stages, a standard-head cone is usually specified. A short-head cone is typically used in tertiary and quaternary stages. Cone crushers can crush stone of medium to very hard compressive strength as well as abrasive stone.

The vertical shaft impact crusher (or VSI) has a rotating shaft that runs vertically through the crushing chamber. In a standard configuration, the VSIs shaft is outfitted with wear-resistant shoes that catch and throw the feed stone against anvils that line the outside of the crushing chamber. The force of the impact, from the stone striking the shoes and anvils, fractures it along its natural fault lines.

VSIs also can be configured to use the rotor as a means of throwing the rock against other rock lining the outside of the chamber through centrifugal force. Known as autogenous crushing, the action of stone striking stone fractures the material. In shoe-and-anvil configurations, VSIs are suitable for medium to very hard stone that is not very abrasive. Autogenous VSIs are suitable for stone of any hardness and abrasion factor.

Roll crushers are a compression-type reduction crusher with a long history of success in a broad range of applications. The crushing chamber is formed by massive drums, revolving toward one another. The gap between the drums is adjustable, and the outer surface of the drum is composed of heavy manganese steel castings known as roll shells that are available with either a smooth or corrugated crushing surface.

Double roll crushers offer up to a 3-to-1 reduction ratio in some applications depending on the characteristics of the material. Triple roll crushers offer up to a 6-to-1 reduction. As a compressive crusher, the roll crusher is well suited for extremely hard and abrasive materials. Automatic welders are available to maintain the roll shell surface and minimize labor expense and wear costs.

These are rugged, dependable crushers, but not as productive as cone crushers with respect to volume. However, roll crushers provide very close product distribution and are excellent for chip stone, particularly when avoiding fines.

Hammermills are similar to impact crushers in the upper chamber where the hammer impacts the in-feed of material. The difference is that the rotor of a hammermill carries a number of swing type or pivoting hammers. Hammermills also incorporate a grate circle in the lower chamber of the crusher. Grates are available in a variety of configurations. The product must pass through the grate circle as it exits the machine, insuring controlled product sizing.

Hammermills crush or pulverize materials that have low abrasion. The rotor speed, hammer type and grate configuration can be converted for different applications. They can be used in a variety of applications, including primary and secondary reduction of aggregates, as well as numerous industrial applications.

Virgin or natural stone processing uses a multi-stage crushing and screening process for producing defined aggregate sizes from large lumps of rock. Such classified final fractions are used as aggregates for concrete, asphalt base, binder and surface course layers in road construction, as well as in building construction. The rock is quarried by means of drilling and blasting. There are then two options for processing the bulk material after it has been reduced to feeding size of the crushing plant: mobile or stationary plants.

When stone is processed in mobile primary crushing plants, excavators or wheel loaders feed the rock into the crusher that is set up at the quarry face, gravel pit or in a recycling yard or demolition site. The crushed material is then either sent to the secondary/tertiary processing stage via stacking conveyors or transported by trucks. Some mobile crushers have an independent secondary screen mounted on the unit, effectively replacing a standalone screen.

The higher the compressive strength of rock, the higher also is its quality, which plays an important role particularly in road construction. A materials compressive strength is delineated into hard, medium-hard or soft rock, which also determines the crushing techniques used for processing to obtain the desired particle sizes.

The materials quality is influenced significantly by particle shape. The more cubic-shaped the individual aggregate particles are, the better the resulting particle interlock. Final grains of pronounced cubic shape are achieved by using several crushing stages. A cubicity showing an edge ratio of better than 1-to-3 is typical of high-quality final aggregate.

As the earths natural resources are becoming ever more scarce, recycling is becoming ever more important. In the building industry, recycling and reuse of demolition concrete or reclaimed asphalt pavement help to reduce the requirements for primary raw materials. Mobile impact and jaw plants are uniquely positioned to produce high-quality reclaimed asphalt pavement (RAP) and recycled concrete aggregate (RCA) for reuse in pavements, road bases, fill and foundations.

Use of RAP and RCA is growing dramatically as road agencies accept them more and more in their specs. But because RAP and RCA come from a variety of sources, to be specified for use by most departments of transportation they must be processed or fractionated and characterized into an engineered, value-added product. RCA or RAP are very commonly crushed and screened to usable sizes often by impact crushers and stored in blended stockpiles that can be characterized by lab testing for use in engineered applications.

Impact crushers are increasingly used for crushing recycling material. Impact crushers are capable of producing mineral aggregate mixes in one single crushing stage in a closed-cycle operation, making them particularly cost-effective. Different crusher units can alternatively be combined to process recycling material. A highly efficient method of processing recycling material combines crushing, screening and separation of metals. To produce an end product of even higher quality, the additional steps of washing to remove light materials such as plastics or paper by air classification and via electromagnetic metal separator are incorporated into the recycling process.

Mobile impact crushers with integrated secondary screens or without integrated screen used in conjunction with an independent mobile screen are ideal for producing large volumes of processed, fractionated RAP or RCA on a relatively small footprint in the plant. Mobile impactors are especially suited for RAP because they break up chunks of asphalt pavement or agglomerations of RAP, rather than downsize the aggregate gradation. Compression-type crushers such as jaws and cones can clog due to packing (caking) of RAP when the RAP is warm or wet.

Contaminants such as soil are part of processing demolition concrete. Mobile impact and jaw crushers when possessing integrated, independent prescreens removing dirt and fines before they ever enter the crushing circuit reduce equipment wear, save fuel, and with some customers, create a salable fill byproduct. A lined, heavy-duty vibrating feeder below the crusher can eliminate belt wear from rebar or dowel or tie bar damage. If present beneath the crusher, this deflector plate can keep tramp metal from degrading the conveyor belt. That way, the feeder below the crusher not the belt absorbs impact of rebar dropping through the crusher.

These mobile jaw and impact crushers may feature a diesel and electric-drive option. In this configuration, the crusher is directly diesel-driven, with the conveyor troughs, belts and prescreen electric-driven via power from the diesel generator. This concept not only reduces diesel fuel consumption, but also results in significantly reduced exhaust emissions and noise levels. This permits extremely efficient operation with low fuel consumption, allowing optimal loading of the crusher.

Jaw crushers operate according to the principle of pressure crushing. The raw feed is crushed in the wedge-shaped pit created between the fixed crusher jaw, and the crusher jaw articulated on an eccentric shaft. The feed material is crushed by the elliptic course of movement and transported downwards. This occurs until the material is smaller than the set crushing size.

Jaw crushers can be used in a wide range of applications. In the weight class up to 77 tons (70 metric tons), they can be used for both virgin stone and recycled concrete and asphalt aggregates processing as a classic primary crusher for natural stone with an active double-deck grizzly, or as a recycling crusher with vibrating discharge chute and the crusher outlet and magnetic separator.

Output for mobile jaw crushers ranges from 100 to 1,500 tph depending on the model size and consistency of the feed material. While larger mobile crushers produce more aggregate faster, transport weights and dimensions may limit how easily the crusher can be shipped long distances. Mobile jaw crushers can have either a vibratory feeder with integrated grizzly, or a vibrating feeder with an independent, double-deck, heavy-duty prescreen. Either way, wear in the system is reduced because medium and smaller gradations bypass the crusher, with an increase in end-product quality because a side-discharge conveyor removes fines. A bypass flap may provide easy diversion of the material flow, eliminating the need for a blind deck.

Jaw crusher units with extra-long, articulated crusher jaws prevent coarse material from blocking while moving all mounting elements of the crusher jaw from the wear area. A more even material flow may be affected if the transfer from the prescreen or the feeder trough is designed so material simply tilts into the crushing jaw.

Mobile jaw and impact crushers alike can be controlled by one operator using a handheld remote. The remote also can be used to move or relocate the crusher within a plant. In other words, the crusher can be run by one worker in the cab of an excavator or loader as he feeds material into the crusher. If he sees something deleterious going into the hopper, he can stop the crusher.

Impact crushing is totally different from pressure crushing. In impact crushing, feed material is picked up by a fast moving rotor, greatly accelerated and smashed against an impact plate (impact toggle). From there, it falls back within range of the rotor. The crushed material is broken again and again until it can pass through the gap between the rotor and impact toggle.

A correctly configured mobile jaw or impact crusher will enhance material flow through the plant and optimize productivity. New-design mobile jaw and impact crushers incorporate a highly efficient flow concept, which eliminates all restriction to the flow of the material throughout the entire plant. With this continuous-feed system, each step the material goes through in the plant is wider than the width of the one before it, eliminating choke or wear points.

For example, a grizzly feeder can be wider than the hopper, and the crusher inlet wider than the feeder. The discharge chute under the crusher is 4 inches wider than the inner width of the crusher, and the subsequent discharge belt is another 4 inches wider than the discharge chute. This configuration permits rapid flow of crushed material through the crusher. Also, performance can be significantly increased if the conveying frequencies of the feeder trough and the prescreen are adapted independently to the level of the crusher, permitting a more equal loading of the crushing area. This flow concept keeps a choke feed to the crusher, eliminating stops/starts of the feed system, which improves production, material shape and wear.

Users are focused on cost, the environment, availability, versatility and, above all, the quality of the end product. Simple crushing is a relatively easy process. But crushing material so that the particle size, distribution and cleanliness meet the high standards for concrete and asphalt requires effective primary screening, intelligent control for optimal loading, an adjustable crusher with high drive output, and a screening unit with oversize return feed.

This starts with continuous flow of material to the crusher through a variable-speed control feeder. Having hopper walls that hydraulically fold integrated into the chassis makes for quick erection of hopper sides on mobile units. If available, a fully independent prescreen for either jaw or impact models offers the ability to effectively prescreen material prior to crushing this allows for product to be sized prior to crushing, as opposed to using a conventional vibrating grizzly. This has the added value of increasing production, reducing wear costs and decreasing fuel consumption.

This independent double-deck vibrating screen affects primary screening of fines and contaminated material via a top-deck interchangeable punched sheet or grizzly, bottom-deck wire mesh or rubber blank. Discharged material might be conveyed either to the left or to the right for ease of positioning. The independent double-deck vibrating prescreen improves flow of material to the crusher, reducing blockages and feed surges.

Modern electrical systems will include effective guards against dust and moisture through double-protective housings, vibration isolation and an overpressure system in which higher air pressure in the electrical box keeps dust out. Simple and logical control of all functions via touch panel, simple error diagnostics by text indicator and remote maintenance system all are things to look for. For crushing demolition concrete, look for a high-performance electro- or permanent magnet with maximum discharge capacity, and hydraulic lifting and lowering function by means of radio remote control.

For impact crushers, a fully hydraulic crusher gap setting with automatic zero-point calculation can speed daily set-up. Featured only on certain mobile impact crushers, a fully hydraulic adjustment capability of the crushing gap permits greater plant uptime, while improving quality of end product.

Not only can the crushing gap be completely adjusted via the touch panel electronic control unit, but the zero point can be calculated while the rotor is running. This ability to accurately set the crusher aprons from the control panel with automatic detection of zero-point and target-value setting saves time, and improves the overall efficiency and handling of the crusher. On these mobile impact crushers, the zero point is the distance between the ledges of the rotor and the impact plates of the lower impact toggle, plus a defined safety distance. The desired crushing gap is approached from this zero point.

While the upper impact toggle is adjusted via simple hydraulic cylinders, the lower impact toggle has a hydraulic crushing gap adjustment device, which is secured electronically and mechanically against collision with the rotor. The crushing gap is set via the touch screen and approached hydraulically. Prior to setting of the crushing gap, the zero point is determined automatically.

For automatic zero-point determination with the rotor running, the impact toggle moves slowly onto the rotor ledges until it makes contact, which is detected by a sensor. The impact toggle then retracts to the defined safe distance. During this procedure, a stop ring slides on the piston rod. When the zero point is reached, the locking chamber is locked hydraulically and the stop ring is thus fixed in position. The stop ring now serves as a mechanical detent for the piston rod. During the stop ring check, which is carried out for every crusher restart, the saved zero point is compared to the actual value via the electronic limit switch. If the value deviates, a zero-point determination is carried out once again.

These impact crushers may feature a new inlet geometry that allows even better penetration of the material into the range of the rotor. Also, the wear behavior of the new C-form impact ledges has been improved to such an extent that the edges remain sharper longer, leading to improved material shape.

The machines come equipped with an efficient direct drive that improves performance. A latest-generation diesel engine transmits its power almost loss-free directly to the crushers flywheel, via a fluid coupling and V-belts. This drive concept enables versatility, as the rotor speed can be adjusted in four stages to suit different processing applications.

Secondary impact crushers and cone crushers are used to further process primary-crushed aggregate, and can be operated with or without attached screening units. These crushers can be used as either secondary or tertiary crushers depending on the application. When interlinked to other mobile units such as a primary or screen, complicated technical processing can be achieved.

Mobile cone crushers have been on the market for many years. These machines can be specially designed for secondary and tertiary crushing in hard-stone applications. They are extraordinarily efficient, diverse in application and very economical to use. To meet the diverse requirements in processing technology, mobile cone crushing plants are available in different sizes and configurations. Whether its a solo cone crusher, one used in addition to a triple-deck screen for closed-loop operation, or various-size cone crushers with a double-deck screen and oversize return conveyor, a suitable plant will be available for almost every task.

Mobile cone crushers may be available with or without integrated screen units. With the latter, an extremely efficient triple-deck screen unit may be used, which allows for closed-loop operation and produces three final products. Here the screen areas must be large so material quantities can be screened efficiently and ensure that the cone crusher always has the correct fill level, which is particularly important for the quality of the end product.

Mobile, tracked crushers and screen plants are advancing into output ranges that were recently only possible using stationary plants. Previously, only stationary plants were used for complicated aggregate processing applications. But thanks to the advancements made in machine technology, it is becoming increasingly possible to employ mobile technology for traditional stationary applications.

Mobile crushers are used in quarries, in mining, on jobsites, and in the recycling industry. These plants are mounted on crawler tracks and can process rock and recycling material, producing mineral aggregate and recycled building materials respectively for the construction industry. A major advantage of mobile crushers is their flexibility to move from one location to the next. They are suitable for transport, but can also cover short distances within the boundaries of their operating site, whether in a quarry or on the jobsite. When operating in quarries, they usually follow the quarry face, processing the stone directly on site.

For transport over long distances to a new location or different quarry, mobile crushers are loaded on low trailers. No more than 20 minutes to an hour is needed for setting the plant up for operation. Their flexibility enables the mobile crushers to process even small quantities of material with economic efficiency.

Mobile plants allow the combination of prescreening that prepares the rock for the crushing process and grading, which precisely separates defined aggregate particle sizes into different end products to be integrated with the crushing unit into one single machine. In the first stage, the material is screened using an active prescreen. After prescreening, it is transferred to the crusher, from where it is either stockpiled via a discharge conveyor or forwarded to a final screen or a secondary crushing stage. Depending on the specified end product, particles are then either graded by screening units or transported to additional crushing stages by secondary or tertiary impact crushers or cone crushers. Further downstream screening units are used for grading the final aggregate fractions.

The process of prescreening, crushing and grading is a common operation in mobile materials processing and can be varied in a number of ways. Mobile crushers with up to three crushing stages are increasingly used in modern quarries. Different mobile crushing and screening plants can be combined for managing more complex crushing and screening jobs that would previously have required a stationary crushing and screening plant.

Interlinked mobile plants incorporate crushers and screens that work in conjunction with each other, and are coordinated in terms of performance and function. Mining permits are under time constraints and mobile plants provide faster setup times. They provide better resale value and reusability, as mobile plants can also be used individually. They also reduce operating costs in terms of fewer haul trucks and less personnel.

With a so-equipped mobile crusher, the feed operator can shut the machine down or change the size of the material, all using the remote control, or use it to walk the crusher from one part of the site to the other, or onto a flat bed trailer for relocation to a different quarry or recycling yard. This reduces personnel and hauling costs compared to a stationary plant. With the mobile jaw or impact primary crusher, the only additional personnel needed would be a skid-steer operator to remove scrap steel, and someone to move the stockpiles.

Thanks to better technology, mobile plants can achieve final aggregate fractions, which previously only were possible with stationary plants. Production availability is on par with stationary plants. Theyre applicable in all quarries, but can be used for small deposits if the owner has several quarries or various operation sites. For example, an operator of several stone quarries can use the plants in changing market situations at different excavation sites. In addition, they also can be used as individual machines. A further factor is that mobile plants, in general, require simpler and shorter licensing procedures.

The high cost of labor keeps going up. A stationary crusher might be able to produce multiple times the amount of product, but also would require about seven or eight workers. Aggregate producers can benefit when producing material with the minimized crew used for mobile jaw and impact crushers.

Using correct maintenance practices, mobile crushers will remain dependable throughout their working life. Crushing and processing material can result in excessive wear on certain components, excessive vibration throughout the plant, and excessive dust in the working environment. Some applications are more aggressive than others. A hard rock application is going to require more maintenance on top of standard maintenance, as there will be more vibration, more dust and more wear than from a softer aggregate.

Due to the nature of its purpose, from the moment a mobile crusher starts, the machine is wearing itself out and breaking itself down. Without routine, regular maintenance and repair, a mobile crusher will not be reliable nor provide the material customers demand.

The first area of wear on any machine is the feed system. Whether its a feeder with an integrated grizzly, or a feeder with an independent prescreen, how the machine is fed contributes to wear. When setting up and maintaining a machine, the machine must be level. A machine that is unlevel left to right will experience increased wear on all components, including the feeder, the screens, the crushing chambers and the conveyor belts. In addition, it reduces production and screening efficiency, as the whole area of the machine is not being effectively used. Also, having the machine sit high at the discharge end will have the effect of feeding the material uphill in the feeder and reducing its efficiency, thus reducing production.

Another area for consideration is the equipment used to feed the machine. The operator using a loader to feed the crusher will have no control over the feed size, as he cannot see whats in the bucket. Whereas with an excavator, the operator can see whats inside and has more control over the feed into the hopper. That is, the operator is not feeding so much material all at once and is controlling the size of the feed. This reduces wear in the feed hoppers impact zones and eliminates material blockages due to feed size being too large to enter the chamber.

Dust is a problem in its own right, especially for the power plant of the mobile crusher. In a very dusty application, it is easy to plug the radiator and have engine-overheating problems. High dust levels cause increased maintenance intervals on air filters, and if not controlled properly, can enter the diesel tank and cause problems with the fuel system. Also, dust that gets inside the crusher increases wear. But if systems are put in place to remove the dust, it should keep it from going into the machine in the first place.

Dust also is a hazard on walkways and a problem for conveyors. If maintained, side-skirting and sealing the conveyors keeps dust from spilling out, building up underneath the conveyor, or building up in rollers, pulleys, bearings, and causing wear on shafts. Its important to maintain the sealing rubbers on the conveyor belts to avoid those issues. Routine maintenance calls for removing accumulated dust from inside and under the machine.

Dust also is a problem for circuit boards and programmable controllers. Dust causes electrical switches to malfunction because it stops the contacts from correctly seating. Electrical systems under positive air pressure dont permit dust to penetrate the control system. In control panels with a correctly maintained positive pressure system, filters remove dust from air that is being pumped into the cabinets. If the filters are plugged, the system will not pull as much air through, allowing dust, moisture and heat to build in the cabinet.

There are also impact aprons against which the rock is thrown, which also see high wear. There are side plates or wear sheets on the sides of the machine. The highest wear area is around the impact crusher itself, around the circumference of the rotor. If not maintained, the wear items will wear through and compromise the structure of the crusher box.

Conduct a daily visual check of the machine. The jaw is simple; just stand up on the walkway and take a look down inside. A crushers jaw plate can be flipped so there are two sides of wear on them. Once half the jaw is worn out, flip it; once that side is worn, change it.

The impact crusher will have an inspection hatch to see inside. Check to see how much material is left on the blow bars and how much is left on the wear sheets on the side of the crusher box. If half the bar is worn out after one week, change the blow bars in another week.The frequency of changes depends entirely on the application and the rock that is being crushed.

They have to be user serviceable, user friendly, and able to be changed in a short time. The best way to change these parts is a service truck with a crane; some use excavators but thats not recommended by any means.

After initial blasting, breakers are used to break down aggregate that typically is not only too large to be hauled in dump trucks, but also too large for crushers that size rock to meet asphalt, drainage system, concrete and landscaping specifications. Breakers can be mounted to a mobile carrier, such as an excavator, or to stationary boom systems that can be attached to a crusher. The total number of hydraulic breakers can vary from site to site depending on production levels, the type of aggregate materials and the entire scope of the operation.

Without hydraulic breakers, workers rely on alternative practices that can quickly affect production rates. For instance, blasting mandates shutting down operations and moving workers to a safe location. And when you consider how many times oversize aggregate might need to be reduced, this can lead to a significant amount of downtime and substantially lower production rates.

Aggregate operations can use hydraulic breakers to attack oversize without having to clear the quarry. But with an ever-growing variety of manufacturers, sizes and models to choose from, narrowing the decision to one hydraulic breaker can be overwhelming with all of the stats and speculation. Thats why its important to know what factors to consider before investing in a new hydraulic breaker.

In most cases, heavy equipment dealers are very knowledgeable about quarry equipment, including breakers, so they are a good resource for finding the best model for a carrier, usually an excavator or stationary boom system. More than likely, they will have specifications and information about various breaker sizes to help gauge what model is best. But being familiar with what to look for in a breaker can streamline the selection process.

The best places to look for breaker information are in the manufacturers brochure, website, owners manual or catalogue. First, carefully review the carrier weight ranges. A breaker that is too big for the carrier can create unsafe working conditions and cause excessive wear to the carrier. An oversized breaker also transmits energy in two directions, toward the aggregate and through the equipment. This produces wasted energy and can damage the carrier. But using a breaker thats too small puts excessive force on the tool steel, which transmits percussive energy from the breaker to the material. Using breakers that are too small also can damage mounting adapters and internal components, which considerably decreases their life.

Once you find a breaker that meets the carriers capacity, check its output power, which is typically measured in foot-pounds. Foot-pound classes are generalizations and are not based on any physical test. Often the breakers output will be documented in one of two ways: as the manufacturers calculated foot-pound class or as an Association of Equipment Manufacturers measured foot-pound rating. Foot-pound class ratings can be deceiving since they are loosely based on the breakers service weight and not the result of any physical test. The AEM rating, on the other hand, measures the force a breaker exerts in a single blow through repeatable and certified testing methods. The AEM rating, which was developed by the Mounted Breaker Manufacturers Bureau, makes it easier to compare breaker models by reviewing true figures collected during an actual test procedure.

For instance, three breaker manufacturers might claim their breakers belong in a 1,000-lb. breaker class. But AEM testing standards could reveal all three actually have less foot-pound impact. You can tell if a breaker has been AEM tested if a manufacturer provides a disclosure statement or if the breaker is labeled with an AEM Tool Energy seal. If you cannot find this information, contact the manufacturer. In addition to output energy specifications, manufacturers often supply estimates for production rates on different types of aggregate material. Make sure to get the right measurements to make the best decision.

In addition to weight and output power, look at the breakers mounting package. Two things are crucial for mounting a breaker to a carrier: a hydraulic installation kit and mounting components. Breakers need hydraulic plumbing with unidirectional flow to move oil from the carrier to the breaker and back again. A one-way flow hydraulic kit is sufficient to power the breaker as long as the components are sized to properly handle the required flows and pressures. But, consider a bidirectional flow hydraulic kit if you plan to use the same carrier with other attachments that require two-way flow. Check with the dealer or breaker manufacturer to determine which hydraulic package best fits current and future needs.

Hydraulic flow and pressure specifications also need to be considered when pairing a breaker to a hydraulic system. If the carrier cannot provide enough flow at the right pressure, the breaker wont perform with maximum output, which lowers productivity and can damage the breaker. Additionally, a breaker receiving too much flow can wear quickly, which reduces its service life. For the best results, follow the hydraulic breaker specifications found in owners manuals, catalogs and brochures. Youll find out if a breaker has additional systems that might require additional servicing. For instance, some breakers feature nitrogen gas-assist systems that work with the hydraulic oil to accelerate the breakers piston. The nitrogen systems specifications need to be followed for consistent breaker power output.

Brackets or pin and bushing kits are commonly required to attach the breaker to the carrier. Typically they are bolted to the top of a breaker and are configured to match a specific carrier. Some manufacturers make universal mounting brackets that can accommodate two or three different sizes of carriers. With the adjustable pins, bushings or other components inside these universal brackets, the breaker can fit a range of carriers. However, varying distances between pin centers can complicate hookups to quick coupling systems. In addition, loose components, such as spacers, can become lost when the breaker is not in use and detached from the carrier.

Some carriers are equipped with quick-coupling systems, which require a breakers mounting interface to be configured like the carriers original attachment. Some manufacturers produce top-mount brackets that pair extremely well with couplers. This allows an operator to use the original bucket pins from the carrier to attach the breaker, and eliminates the need for new pins. This pairing also ensures a fast pickup with the quick coupler.

Its also a good idea to check which breaker tools are available through the dealer and manufacturer. The most common for aggregate mining are chisels and blunts. There are two kinds of chisels commonly used in aggregate mines: crosscut and inline. Both chisels resemble a flat head screwdriver, but the crosscut chisels are used when carrier operators want to direct force in a left-to-right concentration; whereas, inline chisels direct force fore and aft. With chisel tools, operators can concentrate a breakers energy to develop cracks, break open seams or define scribe lines.

If a chisel cant access or develop a crack or seam, a blunt can be used. Blunts have a flattened head that spreads the energy equally in all directions. This creates a shattering effect that promotes cracks and seam separation. Ask your dealer if the tools you are considering are suited for the application. Using non-original equipment manufacturer tool steel can damage the percussive piston in the breaker, seize into the wear bushings, or cause excessive wear.

Regular breaker maintenance is necessary, yet its one of the biggest challenges for aggregate operations. It not only extends the life of the breaker, but also can keep minor inconveniences from turning into expensive problems. Some manufacturers recommend operators inspect breakers daily to check grease levels and make sure there are no worn or damaged parts or hydraulic leaks.

Breakers need to be lubricated with adequate amounts of grease to keep the tool bushing area clear and reduce friction, but follow the manufacturers recommendations. For example, adding grease before properly positioning the breaker can lead to seal damage or even catastrophic failure. And too little grease could cause the bushings to overheat, seize and damage tools. Also, manufacturers advise using high-moly grease that withstands working temperatures greater than 500 degrees. Some breakers have automatic lube systems that manage grease levels, but those systems still need inspections to ensure there is adequate grease in their vessels. Shiny marks on the tool are a good indication the breaker is not properly lubricated.

Little has changed in basic crusher design over past decades, other than that of improvements in speed and chamber design. Rebuilding and keeping the same crusher in operation year after year has long been the typical approach. However, recent developments have brought about the advent of new hydraulic systems in modern crusher designs innovations stimulated by the need for greater productivity as well as a safer working environment. Importantly, the hydraulic systems in modern crusher designs are engineered to deliver greater plant uptime and eliminate the safety risks associated with manual intervention.

Indeed the crushing arena is a hazardous environment. Large material and debris can jam inside the crusher, damaging components and causing costly downtime. Importantly, manually digging out the crusher before repairs or restarts puts workers in extremely dangerous positions.

The Mine Safety and Health Administration has reported numerous injuries and fatalities incurred when climbing in or under the jaw to manually clear, repair or adjust the typical older-style jaw crusher. Consider that fatalities and injuries can occur even when the machine is locked out and tagged out. Recent examples include a foreman injured while attempting to dislodge a piece of steel caught in the primary jaw crusher. Another incident involved a fatality when a maintenance man was removing the toggle plate seat from the pitman on a jaw crusher. The worker was standing on a temporary platform when the bolts holding the toggle seat were removed, causing the pitman to move and strike him.

The hydraulic systems on modern crusher designs eliminate the need for workers to place themselves in or under the crusher. An overview of hydraulic system technology points to these three key elements:

A hydraulic chamber-clearing system that automatically opens the crusher to a safe position, allowing materials to pass. A hydraulic overload relief that protects parts and components against overload damage. A hydraulic adjustment that eliminates the maintenance downtime associated with manual crusher adjustments, and maintains safe, consistent crusher output without the need for worker intervention.

Whether a crusher is jammed by large material, tramp iron or uncrushable debris; or is stalled by a power failure the chamber must be cleared before restarting. Manual clearing is a lengthy and risky task, especially since material can be wedged inside the crusher with tremendous pressure, and dislodging poses much danger to workers placed in harms way inside the crusher.

Unlike that of the older-style jaw, the modern jaw will clear itself automatically with hydraulics that open the crusher to a safe position, and allow materials to pass again, without the need for manual intervention. If a feeder or deflector plate is installed under the crusher, uncrushable material will transfer smoothly onto the conveyor without slicing the belt.

To prevent crusher damage, downtime and difficult maintenance procedures, the hydraulic overload relief system opens the crusher when internal forces become too high, protecting the unit against costly component failure. After relief, the system automatically returns the crusher to the previous setting for continued crushing.

The modern crusher is engineered with oversized hydraulic cylinders and a traveling toggle beam to achieve reliable overload protection and simple crusher adjustment. All closed-side setting adjustments are made with push-button controls, with no shims being needed at any time (to shim is the act of inserting a timber or other materials under equipment). This is a key development as many accidents and injuries have occurred during shim adjustment, a process which has no less than 15 steps as described in the primary crusher shim adjustment training program offered by MSHA.

cone crushers for sale

The cone crusherwas designed primarily with a view to achieving top performance in the field of fine-reduction crushing. It has also been adapted to what is designated simply as fine crushing, which extends into a range below that ordinarily defined by the term fine-reduction. Although the eccentric speeds of the various sizes of this type are not quite so high as the speeds used for the Newhouse crusher, the Hydro-cone crusher definitely rates as a high-speed machine, its product comparing quite closely to that of the former type, for equal close-side settings.Probably the outstanding feature of the. Hydrocone crusher is the hydraulic support, from which its name is derived and which is clearly shown in the sectional view. This device makes it possible to adjust the crusher to any desired setting within its range in a matter of seconds;adjustments may be made while the crusher is running, although the feed must be shut off before operating the adjusting pump. An accumulator in the hydraulic system provides protection against tramp iron or packing.

Cone crushers are used in AG and SAG grinding circuits to increase tonnage by effectively dealing with any pebble (critical size) build-up problem. Normally, heavy-duty short-head crushers are employed to crush pebbles. Power and crusher cavity level are the key variables for monitoring and controlling the crusher operation. Crusher product size is adjusted by changing the closed side setting.

On the left is a diagram of the Hydro-cone crushing chamber. A comparison of this chamber with those previously discussed is interesting. It will be noted that the choke-point has been raised far above the discharge level, in fact, to a point not far below the nip-point for the recommended maximum one-way feed dimension. By virtue of the decided flare of the head, and the corresponding flare of the top shell bore, the line-of-mean-diameters slopes sharply away from the crusher centerline. For some, distance above the discharge point the angle between head and concave is very acute; in fact, at the open-side position of the head, this zone is almost parallel. For recommended operating conditions, i.e., for safe combinations of throw and setting, and with screened feed, this type of crushing chamber does not approach anything like a choke or near-choke condition. For the combination shown in the diagram the ratio of volume reduction is almost 1:1 from zone 0-1 to zone 2-3 at the choke-point; consequently, if the crusher is given a screened feed (as all fine-reduction crushers should be) the reduction in voids by the time the choke-point is reached cannot very well reach serious proportions. The diagram shows the standard chamber. With screened feed, these crushers will operate at closed-side discharge settings equal to the throw of the head at the discharge point (usually spoken of as eccentric-throw.)

The level in the crusher feed pocket is an important variable since it can indicate whether the feed is building up. A build-up could lead to a plugin the feed chute, a spill through the skirting on the crusher feed, or a crusher plug. None of these are desirable.

In a normal feed situation, the level in the crusher cavity is kept fairly low, just enough to ensure that there is sufficient feed to keep the crusher working, but if the feed has to be suspended suddenly because of impending plugging, the crush-out wont take too long (10 seconds or less). Normal feed is usually used in standard crushers where the feed particle size is quite large, say greater than 65 mm.

Choke feed is when the crusher cavity is kept full, without spilling out through the skirting. Choke feeding is usually used in short-head crushers where the feed particle is smaller than that for a standard crusher.

This crusher is a modification of the standard machine, developed for fine-crushing duty. Mechanically, the machine is the same in every respect as the standard crusher of the same type, but for each developed size of machine a special top shell and the concave ring has been designed, with reduced receiving opening, reduced angularity between head and concave, and, consequently, superior characteristics at the finer settings. Medium crushing chambers may be operated at close-side settings of one-half the eccentric-throw, on screened feed; hence capacities at the finer settings are better than those of the standard type. Fine crushing chambers operate at one-fourth the eccentric throw. Inasmuch as the maximum feed size is smaller in the case of the fine chamber, the ratios of reduction are approximately the same for both machines.

There are two main types of cone crushers: standard and shorthead. They differ by the shape of the cavity. The standard crusher cavity is wider to accommodate larger feed-size material. The short head crusher is designed to crush finer material and to produce a finer product.

The closest approach between the mantle and the bowl liner is called the closed side setting. This is usually specified by the metallurgist to give the desired crusher product discharge size. It can be checked by running the crusher empty, hanging a lead plug into the crusher bowl, and then removing it to measure the gap. The gap is adjusted by rotating the bowl. Some crushers are equipped with a hydraulic jack mechanism on the crushing head assembly instead of having a bowl adjustment ring. The head can be raised or lowered to meet the operators needs. It can be very helpful in operation and process control.

The Symons Cone Crusher has come into almost universal use during the last few years for the final stage of crushing. It is a development of the secondary gyratory crusher, which is merely a small gyratory crusher designed to break the product of the primary machine down to about 1-in. size; but the main shaft of a cone crusher instead of being suspended from a spider is supported on a large socket bearing situated immediately under the crushing head and protected from grit and dust by a sealing assembly, this bearing taking the whole of the crushing load.

Fig. 8 gives a sectional view of the machine. The main shaft is carried in a long gear-driven eccentric, the rotation of which causes the gyration of the head in the usual way, but the center of gyration is at the apex of the crushing head instead of in the spider. At the top of the bowl, therefore, the lumps of ore entering the crushing zone are cracked by short powerful strokes; but at the bottom the head has a much longer but less powerful stroke, enabling the ore in the finishing stages to be rapidly crushed and quickly discharged without any tendency to choke, a condition which reduces over crushing to a minimum. This, together with the curved shape of the bowl, accounts for the large reduction ratio possible with this type of machine and makes it superior to other secondary crushers and coarse rolls.

It will be seen that the head and the bowl are parallel at the lower part of the crushing zone. The parallel space is deep enough, in conjunction with the speed of gyration, to ensure that no piece of ore can pass through it without being struck two or three times by the head before it falls clear. It follows that, unlike the jaw and gyratory crushers, the size of the product is determined by the distance apart of the bottom edges of the head and bowl in the position when they are closest together.

Coarse buttress threads on the outer circumference of the bowl fit into corresponding threads on the inner side of the adjusting ring, which is held down to the mainframe by a circle of long heavy springs, flexible enough to allow the whole assembly to rise should tramp iron or other uncrushable material enters the crushing zone. By means of a windlass and chain, the bowl can be rotated in the threads that support it in the adjusting ring while the machine is running, thus enabling the bowl liner to be adjusted for wear or the size of the product to be changed without stopping. The cone crusher is usually set to give a 3/8-in. or -in. product when discharging to ball mills.

Table 9 gives particulars of the different sizes of crushers. The capacity figures are based on material weighing 100 lb. per cubic foot and must be increased in direct proportions for heavier ores. It will be noted that each size of machine has two ranges of capacity; this is due to the fact that it can be fitted with a coarse or a fine crushing bowl according to the duty that is required of it. With either one, the range of reduction is greater than is economically possible with any other type of dry crushing machine.

A possible disadvantage of the cone crusher is that as a rule it cannot be choke-fed, but must be given an even feed of ore if it is to do efficient work. Should circumstances call for the installation of a machine that can be run if necessary with the ore piled up over the top of the head, a secondary gyratory crusher of the suspended shaft type will be required. The Traylor Reduction Crusher Type TZ, which is constructed on the principles of an ordinary gyratory crusher, but is fitted with a curved bowl liner similar to that of the Symons Cone Crusher, is designed to meet the case. Although the suspension of the shaft restricts the movement of the head to a smaller circle of gyration than that of the cone crusher, the ratio of reduction is still large enough to enable it to crush the product of the primary breaker to -in. size (-in. for the large machines), and it fulfills the condition that it can be choke-fed. Owing to the smaller movement of the head, however, the capacity for a given range is much less than that of the equivalent size of cone crusher, and the latter is therefore preferred when choke-feeding can be avoided.

The Symons Shorthead Cone Crusher, which is constructed on the same general principles as the larger machine, is designed to follow the latter, taking its product at 1-in. and reducing it to about -in. size. The strains imposed on the crushing members, however, would be very heavy if the machine were run with the discharge opening set to -in. or less. It is usual, therefore, to crush in closed circuit with a screen, the discharge opening of the bowl being set to 5/8 or in. Thus a circulating load is built up and a certain amount of choke-crushing takes place, but the method actually gives greater efficiency with a finer product than can be obtained in an open circuit, whatever the discharge setting of the bowl in the latter case.

In ordinary crushing practice, the grinding section is supplied with -in. or 3/8-in. material direct from Symons Cone Crushers. But the demand is for a finer feed and it seems likely that the Shorthead Cone Crusher will satisfy this demand to the exclusion of fine crushing rolls.

Symons Cone Crushers have been used extensively for secondary crushing in metallic, non-metallic, rock products, and industrial operations. The Symons Cone was developed to give large capacity, fine crushing. The combination of high speed and wide travel of the cone results in a series of rapid, hammer-like blows on the material as it passes through the crushing cavity and permits the free flow of material through the cavity.

Reduction in size of any particle, with each impact of the head, is regulated by the opening between the head and bowl at that point. A threaded arrangement of the bowl affords a quick and easy method for changing the size of the product or to compensate for wear. This adjustment can be made while the crusher is operating. A parallel zone between the lower portion of the crushing members assures uniform sizing.

Frame, adjustment ring, and cone are made of cast steel; gears are made of specially treated steel and have cut teeth; all bearings are bronze; mantle and bowl liners are manganese steel. The head and shaft can be removed as a unit, and other parts such as the eccentric and thrust bearings can easily be lifted out after the head is removed. The countershaft assembly can also be removed as a complete unit.

The circle of heavy coil springs, which holds the bowl and adjustment ring down firmly onto the frame, provides automatic protection against damage due to tramp iron. These springs compress, allowing the bowl to rise the full movement of the head until non-crushable material passes through. The springs then automatically return to their normal position.

Symons Cone Crushers are made in Standard and Short Head types. They are of the same general construction but differ in the shape of the crushing cavity. The Standard cone is used for intermediate crushing. The Short Head cone is used for finer crushing. It has a steeper angle of the head, a shorter crushing cavity, and greater movement of the head at the top of the crushing cavity.

If you observe the illustrations you will notice that the center line of the main shaft is at an angle to the center line of the crusher. The center of the main shaft bisects the center line of the crusher at the opening of the crushing chamber. As the MANTLE revolves that point is the pivot point of the mantle. This means that both the top and the bottom of the crusher mantle have a circular gyrating motion.

Tramp iron had long been a source of worry to those engaged in fine crushing.Here is what one operator had to say.Shutdowns were frequent, costs were uncertain because of enforced delays due to excessive breakage. Plugged machines had to be freed continually with a torch tocut out frozen and wedged-in tramp iron.The cone crusher overcame these troubles,helped reduce and stabilize costs. The bestevidence of this statement is the universalacceptance of the cone as the outstandingcrusher in its field.

While tramp iron is not recommended as a regular diet for a Cone Crusher, its construction is such that damage will not result should any ordinary noncrushable material get into the crushing cavity. The band of heavy coil springs encircling the frame allows the bowl to lift from its seat with each movement of the head until Such non-crushable object passes off into the discharge. The tramp iron shown in the accompanying illustration passed the protective devices installed for its removal and would have resulted in expensive repairs and long shutdown periods for any crusher except the Symons Cone.

Cone crushers can have two types of heads, standard and short head types. The principle difference between the two is in the shape (size and volume) of the crushing cavities and feed plate arrangements. Standard head cone crushers have cavities that are designed to take a primary crushed feed ranging up to 300mm generating product sizes around 20mm to 40mm. For finer products, short head cone crushers are normally used. They have a steeper angle of the head and a more parallel crushing cavity than the standard machines. Due to the more compact chamber volume and shorter working crushing length, the much needed higher crushing forces/power can be imparted to the smaller-sized material being fed to the crusher. Cavities for the short head machine are designed to produce a crushed product ranging from 5mm to 20mm in a closed circuit.

At the discharge end of the cone crusher is a parallel crushing section, where all material passing through must receive at least one impact. This ensures that all particles, which pass through the cone crusher, will have a maximum size, in at least one dimension, no larger than the set of the crusher. For this reason, the set of a cone crusher can be specified as the minimum discharge opening, being commonly known as the closed side setting (CSS).

Here are facts about the conecrusher known as Hydrocone. This line of hydraulically adjusted gyratory crushers was developed in smaller sizes some fifteen years ago by Allis-Chalmers to meet a demand for improved secondary or tertiary crushing units. The line is now expanded to include sizes up to 84-in. diameter cones.

This modern crusher is the result of many years of experience in building all types of crushing equipment, when the first gyratory or cone crusher, the Gates, was put into operation. Overall these years AC has followed a continuing policy of improvement in crusher engineering, changes in design being based on operating experience of crushers in actual operation.

The Hydrocone cone crusher is the logical outgrowth, a crusher having a means of rapidly changing product size or compensating for wear on the crushing surfaces a crusher which produces a better, more cubical product than any comparable crusher and a crusher so designed that it can be operated and maintained with a minimum of expense.

The most important fact about the Hydrocone crusher is its hydraulic principle of operation. Hydraulic control makes possible quick, accurate product size adjustments fast unloading of the crushing chamber in case of power failure or other emergency protection against tramp iron or other uncrushable materials in the crushing chamber. Another important fact about this crusher is its simplicity of design and operation. The accompanying sketch shows the simplicity of the Hydrocone crushers principle of operation. The main shaft assembly, including the crushing cone, is supported on a hydraulic jack. When oil is pumped into or out of the jack the mainshaft assembly is raised or lowered, changing the crusher setting.

Since the crushing cone is supported on a hydraulic jack, its position with respect to the concave ring, and therefore the crusher setting, can be controlled by the amount of oil in the hydraulic jack.

Speed-Set control raises or lowers the crushing shaft assembly hydraulically, and permits quick adjustment to produce precise product specifications without stopping the crusher. Speed-Set control also provides a convenient way to compensate for wear on crushing surfaces.

On Hydrocone crushers in sizes up to 48-in., the Speed-Set device is a hand-driven gear pump; on the larger sizes a motor-driven gear pump operated by push-button. On all sizes the setting can be changed in a matter of minutes by one man without additional equipment, reducing downtime materially.

Protection against tramp iron or other uncrushable materials is afforded by an accumulator in the hydraulic system. This consists of a neoprene rubber oil-resistant bladder inside a steel shell. This bladder is inflated with nitrogen to a predetermined pressure higher than the average pressures encountered during normal crushing.

Ordinarily, the Automatic Reset remains inoperative, but if steel or some other foreign material should enter the crushing chamber, the oil pressure in the hydraulic jack will exceed the gas pressure in the accumulator. The bladder will then compress, allowing the oil to enter the steel shell. This permits the crushing cone to lower and discharge the uncrushable material without damage to the crusher.

After the crushing chamber is freed of the foreign material, the gas pressure in the accumulator will again exceed the oil pressure in the hydraulic system. Oil is then expelled from the accumulator shell and the crushing cone is returned to its original operating setting automatically.

A Hydrocone crusher will produce a cubical product with excellent size distribution and a minimum of flats and slivers. This is especially important in the crushed stone industry where a cubical stone is required to meet rigid product specifications. It is also of considerable significance in the mining industry where the elimination of large amounts of tramp oversize reduces circulating loads or makes open circuit crushing possible.

The reason why the Hydrocone crusher will produce such a uniform, cubical product is that it has a small eccentric throw with respect to the crusher setting. This means a smaller effective ratio of reduction during each crushing stroke, and therefore, the production of fewer fines and slivers. Likewise, a small eccentric throw means a small open side setting, which results in a smaller top size of the product. A large percentage of the product from a Hydrocone crusher will be of a size equal to or finer than the close side setting.

For fine crushing, or in installations where the feed to the crusher is irregular, the use of a wobble plate feeder is recommended. This feeder is installed in place of the spider cap and affords a means of controlling the feed to the crusher, as well as a means of distributing the feed evenly around the crushing chamber.

Essentially, the feeder consists of a plate that is oscillated by a shaft extending down into the crushers main shaft. The motion of the main shaft oscillates or wobbles the feeder plate. The plate is supported on a rubber mounting which permits its motion and, at the same time, positively seals the top of the spider bearing against the entry of dust. Maintenance is reduced by the use of self-lubricating bushings between the feeder plate shaft and the crusher main shaft.

Hydrocone crushers are mounted on rubber machinery mountings in order to reduce installation costs and make it possible to locate these machines on the upper floors of crushing plants. These mountings operate without maintenance, absorb the gyrating motion of the crusher, thereby eliminating the need for massive foundations. Rubber mountings also prolong the life of the eccentric bearing, since this bearing is not subjected to the severe pounding encountered when rigid mountings are used.

The exclusion of dust and dirt from the internal mechanism of the crusher is of extreme importance from a maintenance standpoint. To accomplish this, Hydrocone crushers are equipped with one of the most effective dust seals yet devised.

This seal consists of a self-lubricating, graphite impregnated plastic ring which is supported from the head center in such a way that it is free to rotate, or gyrate, independently of the head center.

The plastic ring surrounds the dust collar with only a very slight clearance between the two parts. With the plastic ring being free to move as it is, it accommodates the rotation, gyration, and vertical movement of the main shaft assembly, maintaining the seal around the dust collar at all times. Because of its lightweight and self-lubricating characteristics, wear on the plastic ring is negligible.

The ease with which any wearing part can be replaced is of the utmost importance to any crusher operator. With this in mind, the Hydrocone crusher has been designed so that any part can be replaced by disturbing only a minimum number of other parts.

For example, the Mantalloy crushing surfaces are exposed by simply removing the top shell from the crusher. This can be done easily by removing the nuts from the studs at the top and bottom shell joint. The eccentric and hydraulic support mechanisms are serviced from underneath the crusher without disturbing any of the feeding arrangements, or the upper part of the crusher.

Efficient lubrication of all wearing parts is one of the reasons why crushing costs are low with the Hydrocone crusher. On most sizes, lubrication is divided into three distinct systems, each functioning independently.

This bearing, whether of the ball and socket type as on the smaller sizes, or of the hourglass design (as shown) found on the larger Hydrocone crushers, is pool lubricated. On the 51, 60 and 84-inch sizes, provision is made for introducing the lubricant from outside the top shell through the spider arm. On the smaller crushers, oil is introduced through an oil inlet in the spider cap. On all sizes, oil is retained in the bearing by a garter-type oil seal located in the base of the spider bearing.

All Hydrocone crushers are provided with a compact external lubrication system consisting of an oil storage tank, an independently motor-driven oil pump, a pressure-type oil filter, and a condenser-type cooler.

Cool, clean oil is pumped into the crusher from the conditioning tank, lubricating first the three-piece step bearing assembly. The oil then travels up the inner surface of the eccentric, lubricating the eccentric bearing and main shaft.

At the top of the eccentric, the oil is split into two paths. Part of the oil flow passes through ports in the eccentric and down its outer surface, lubricating the bronze bottom shell bushing, driving gears and wearing ring. On the 48-in. and smaller crushers, the balance of the oil overflows the eccentric and returns over the gears to the bottom of the crusher where it flows by gravity back into the conditioning tank. On the 51-in. and larger Hydrocone crushers, any oil which overflows the top of the eccentric is returned directly to the conditioning system without coming into contact with the gears.

On all but the 36 and 48-in. Hydrocone crushers, the countershaft bearings are of the anti-friction type with separate pool lubrication. Both ends of the countershaft bearing housing are sealed by garter spring-type oil seals to prevent dirt or other contaminants from entering the system.

Rather than use one eccentric throw under all operating conditions, Hydrocone crushers are designed to operate most efficiently with a predetermined ratio of eccentric throw to the crusher setting. By operating with an eccentric throw specifically selected for a given application, the most desirable crushing conditions are attained the most economical use of Mantalloy crushing surfaces reduced crusher maintenance a more cubical product.

The eccentric throw is controlled by a replaceable bronze sleeve in the cast steel eccentric. This sleeve, being a wearing part, can be renewed readily in the field. Also, should operating conditions change, the throw or motion of the crushing head can be changed accordingly.

Because of the large choice of eccentric throws available and the variety of crushing chambers that may be obtained a Hydrocone crusher may be selected that will fulfill the requirements of almost any secondary or tertiary crushing operation.

They may be used in the crushed stone industries to produce a premium cubical product in the mining industries to produce a grinding mill feed having a minimum of oversize, thereby reducing circulating loads and making open circuit crushing possible. The Hydrocone crusher is used in the cement industry to reduce cement clinker prior to finish grinding.

One of three general types of crushing chambers can be furnished for any size Hydrocone crusher to suit your specific needs. The selection of the proper chamber for a given application is dependent upon the feed size, the tonnage to be handled and the product desired. A crusher already in use can be readily converted to meet changing requirements, making this machine highly flexible in operation.

The Coarse crushing chamber affords the maximum feed opening for a given size crusher. Crushers fitted with a Coarse chamber can be choke fed, provided that product size material in the feed is removed.

The Coarse chamber has a relatively short parallel zone and is designed to be operated at a close side setting equal to or greater than the eccentric throw. For example, a crusher with a 3/8-in. the eccentric throw should be operated at a 3/8-in. (or more) close side setting, and therefore a -in. open side setting. Optimum capacity and product will result when operated under these conditions, as well as most economical wear on the mantalloy crushing surfaces.

One way dimension (slot size) of the feed to a crusher fitted with a Coarse chamber should not exceed two-thirds to 70 percent of the feed opening. The maximum feed size to an 848 Hydrocone crusher would therefore be about 5-in. one way dimension.

The use of a wobble plate feeder, furnished as optional equipment, is recommended if the feed size is relatively large, if the crusher is to be operated in closed circuit, or if the feed to the crusher is irregular.

If the Hydrocone crusher is operated with a Coarse crushing chamber, the product will average about 60% passing a square mesh testing sieve equal to the close side setting of the crusher. On certain materials which break very slabby, this percentage will be somewhat lower, and on cubically breaking material the percentage will be somewhat higher. As an average, approximately 90% of the product will pass a square mesh testing sieve corresponding to the open side setting, although this percentage frequently runs higher.

The Intermediate crushing chamber has a feed opening somewhat less than a coarse crushing chamber, but because of its longer parallel zone, is designed to be operated at a close side setting equal to or greater than half the eccentric throw. For example, with a -in. eccentric throw, the minimum close side setting would be 3/8-in.

Crushers fitted with this type of chamber can be choke fed, provided that product size material in the feed be removed ahead of the crusher. The one-way dimension or slot size of the feed to a crusher should not exceed approximately half the receiving opening. A 436 Hydrocone crusher with a 5/8-in. the eccentric throw could be operated at 5/16-in. close side setting and feed size should not exceed 2-in. one-way dimension.

The wobble plate feeder, although not required under most circumstances, is recommended if the feed is irregular, or if the crusher is operated as a re-crusher, at a relatively close setting, or in a closed circuit.

Because of the longer parallel zone in this crushing chamber, a somewhat greater percentage of the product will pass a square mesh testing sieve equal to the close side setting. This will usually average about 65 to 70%, with this percentage varying, depending on the material being crushed. Very frequently, 100% of the product will pass a square mesh testing sieve equal to the open side setting of the crusher.

The Fine crushing chamber has the longest parallel zone and therefore the smallest feed opening for any given size crusher. It can be operated at ratios of eccentric throw to close side setting of up to 4 to 1. With a -in. throw, for example, a 236 Hydro-cone crusher could be operated at 3/16-in. on the close side.

Because of their design, crushers with Fine crushing chambers cannot be choke fed but must be equipped with the wobble plate feeder. The maximum one-way dimension of the feed approaches the crusher feed opening. A 348 Hydrocone crusher can be fed with material up to 3-in. one-way dimension.

The Fine crushing chamber will give the highest percentage passing the close side setting of any of the chambers discussed here. The product will average approximately 75% passing a square mesh testing sieve equal to the close side setting. Because of the long parallel zone, the top size of the product will be only slightly larger than the close side setting of the crusher.

In addition to the three general types of crushing chambers described here, special chambers can be designed to meet varying operating requirements, giving the crusher even greater flexibility than can be obtained with these three main types.

For example, a special concave ring can be used in a 636 Hydro-cone crusher which will reduce the feed opening to 5 inches and permits a two to one ratio of eccentric throw to close side setting. Thus, the crusher can be furnished to fit the exact requirements of any application.

The following capacity table gives a complete range of all Hydrocone cone crusher capacities with varying crushing chambers and eccentric throws. This table shows the minimum recommended setting for any given eccentric throw, the recommended maximum one-way (slot size) dimension of the feed, and the maximum recommended horsepower for any eccentric throw.

Capacities given are based on crushing dry feed from which the product size material has been removed. The material must readily enter the feed opening and be evenly distributed around the crushing chamber. The table is based on material weighing 100 lb per cubic foot crushed. Any variation from this must be accounted for.

The curves on the following page can be used to approximate the screen analysis of the product from any given Hydrocone crusher. These curves are only approximations since the actual screen analysis of the product of a Hydrocone crusher will depend upon the nature of the material being crushed, the feed size and a number of other considerations which could not be taken into account in these curves. Within these limits, the curves should give fairly accurate estimates.

Note that the Coarse crushing chamber is represented as giving a product of which 60 percent will pass the close side setting, the Intermediate chamber 67 percent and the Fine chamber 75 percent passing the close side setting. These percentages are the averages of a large number of tests and some variations from these must be expected. If material breaks slabby the percentage with a coarse crushing chamber may be as low as 50 percent; if it breaks very cubically it might be as high as 70 percent, or even higher.

These curves have been prepared so that they can be used for any crushing chamber. To estimate the product of any Hydrocone crusher, it is necessary to know the type of crushing chamber used (Coarse, Intermediate or Fine), the close side setting and the eccentric throw.

If the crusher is a 636 Hydrocone crusher with a 3/8-in. throw and a 3/8-in. close side setting, the approximate screen analysis would be the curve that would pass through the 3/8-in. horizontal line and the vertical line representing the close side setting for the Coarse crushing chamber, which is the 60 percent passing line. If no curve passes through the precise point of intersection between the horizontal and vertical lines, an approximate curve can be sketched in which parallels the other curves. The same procedure can be used for approximating the products from any other crushing chamber.

Barite..170 Basalt.100 Cement Clinker.95 Coal..40-60 Coke.23-32 Glass..95 Granite100 Gravel.100 Gypsum..85 Iron Ore.125-150 Limestone..95-100 Magnesite.100 Perlite..95 Porphyry.100 Quartz..95 Sandstone..85 Slag..80 Taconite125 Talc..95 Trap Rock100

We canprovide testing to solve the most difficult crushing problems. Laboratory equipment makes it possible to measure the crushing strengths and characteristics of rock or ore samples accurately, and this data is used in the selection of a crusher of proper size and type.

Impact and batch tests are frequently sufficient to indicate the type and size crusher that will be the most economical for a particular application. However, batch testing is often followed by pilot plant tests to provide additional information about large-scale operations, or to observe rock or ore reduction under actual plant operating conditions.

Pilot plant tests duplicate a continuous crushing operation provide a practical demonstration of the commercial potential of the process on a pilot scale. Such tests are useful because they may disclose factors that affect the full-scale operation, favorably or otherwise, but which remain hidden in tests on limited samples.

All Laboratory tests are guided by modern scientific knowledge of crushing fundamentals and by ourinvaluable backlog of experience in engineering and building all types of crushing equipment for any crushing application.

In addition to the facilities for crushing tests, the Laboratory maintains complete batch and pilot mill facilities for use in investigating an entire process. Tests in grinding, sizing, concentrating, thickening, filtering, drying, and pyro- processing can be made.

mc-c series crawler cone mobile crusher

C series cone crusher is widely applicated in mining, cement plants, sandstone industries, suitable for different rocks under 350MPA, such as iron ore, non-ferrous metal ore, basalt, granite, limestone, sandstone, pebbles, etc.

Material is crushed layers and full of crushing cavity. Material is pressed, sheared and rubbed to crash full directions in the crushing cavity to realize the breaking and self-braking of material, which can avoid the direct contact of the crusher cavity wall to prevent the liner plate from wearing each other, avoids the material being polluted by metal pollutants to reduce the wearing of parts. Extending wearing parts service life and crushing rate can be two times higher than other similar equipment.

1high crushing rate and high production efficiency2flexible application3less consumption of wearing parts and low operation cost4advanced automatic control5layer press crushing, fine grain shape6simple maintenance7Perfect pre-sales and after-sales service.

forces in a cone crusher | springerlink

The literature on the design of cone crushers and analysis of the corresponding crushing processes is mainly based on empirical observations. As a result, it is generally accepted that the crushing action is due solely to compressive forces. Crushers are designed on that basis. Accordingly, many cone crushers today are characterized by common operating principles. Most theoretical work on cone crushers focuses on performance characteristics such as the productivity, degree of crushing, or increase in content of the target fraction or on operational characteristics of individual crusher components such as the life of the armored lining or the increase in life of bearings and drives. To improve those characteristics, a crushing-chamber design with complex armored lining has been developed, while the working components (cones) combine elements of those used in other crushers (of roller or jaw type). However, kinematic efficiency of the working component is only considered in terms of the creation of compressive forces in the material being crushed and minimization of slip. Most of the energy supplied to any crusher is consumed in creating the destructive load. The basic contention of the present work is that, in certain circumstances, it is possible to increase the energy efficiency of the crushing process. One option is to create a complex stress state in the material to be crushed. Some crusher designs are considered, and their applicability is discussed. The creation of a complex stress state in the crusher permitting decrease in its energy consumption is described. Recommendations are made regarding the creation of energy-efficient conditions in the crusher.

Johansson, M., Quist, J., Evertsson, M., and Hulthn, E., Cone crusher performance evaluation using DEM simulations and laboratory experiments for model validation, Miner. Eng., 2017, vols. 103104, pp. 93101.

Vitushkin, A.V., Development of kinematic scheme and calculation methods of parameters of crushing machine with translational motion of jaws, Extended Abstract of Cand. Sci. (Eng.) Dissertation, Novokuznetsk, 2013.

Nikitin, A.G., Laktionov, S.A., and Sakharov, D.F., Mathematical model of process of deterioration of a brittle material in a single-roll crusher, Izv. Vyssh. Uchebn. Zaved., Chern. Metall., 2012, no. 8, pp. 3638.

Nikitin, A.G., Laktionov, S.A., and Kuznetsov, M.A., Position of plane of maximum shear stress at fracture of brittle pieces in roll crushers, Izv. Vyssh. Uchebn. Zaved., Chern. Metall., 2013, no. 7, pp. 4244.

cone crushers - meka crushing & screening plants

MEKAs cone crusher is a very good example of our determination to gain customer trust in the field of crushing and screening equipment. The solid structure required for crushing very hard materials allows the operators to employ the cone crusher for a wide range of applications, crushing everything from limestone to basalt. In addition, its versatility enables our customers to keep a high profit level in changing conditions. The cone crushers optimised speed and improved crushing chamber design provides high productivity with less wear on parts, meaning a great savings in labour. The adjustable crushing chamber can provide the required size of material, and is able to meet a variety of customer needs.

Today, technology is a part of every aspect of life, and our businesses are no exception. MEKA aims to satisfy our customers needs completely because we know that client profitability pays dividends in higher trust and better customer relationships. MEKA cone crushers arrive to our customers complete with the automation system as standard, without any extra charge.

Our automation system maintains closed side settings in a stable position by tracking wear part abrasion. This creates a significant increase in crushing efficiency and also enables the use of wear parts for longer, with more profitability. In addition, it makes scheduling wear part replacement easier than ever. The automatic control system can adapt the closed side settings in accordance with different feed conditions and keep the system in choke feed, creating more rock-on-rock crushing action and increasing profitability.

Automation helps to increase the security of the crusher in case non-crushable material, such as a piece of metal, enters into the crusher cavity and causes high pressure. The relief valve is opened automatically, releasing hydraulic oil from the cylinders to prevent the machine from being severely damaged.

jaw crusher vs cone crusher | advantages and disadvantages

Jaw crushers and cone crushers both are a classic laminated crusher. Also is the most mainstream crusher type. Jaw crusher is usually used as a primary crusher and second-class crusher. Cone crusher is usually used as secondary crusher or three-stage crusher machine. Jaw crusher and cone crusher are usually arranged on the stone crusher plant in two stages.

Jaw crusher breaks the rock to 10 ~ 30 cm size. Cone crushing machine further broke the stone to below 10 cm. Large cone crushers (gyratory crushers) also can as head crushers. Fine jaw crusher also can as a two-stage crusher, crushing stone to cm grade particle size range.

Cone rock crusher and Jaw stone crusher are a laminated crushing principle. Which is commonly known as the impact crushing principle The nature of crushing doesnt change too much, although the actuator of crushing use of different structure. The cone crusher adopts the extrusion process between the grinding wall and the crushing wall. Jaw crusher adopts the extrusion process between the moving jaw plate and the static jaw plate.

Cone crusher and jaw crusher are widely used, but the applicability of the two types of crusher is different. Jaw crusher has the most extensive adaptability and can meet the crushing requirements of almost any kind of materials. Cone crusher is also very wide applicability, but the Metso cone crusher price is high. Low corrosive materials can choose a low-cost impact crusher. Therefore, the applicability of metsos cone crusher has been reduced in economic consideration.

Cone crushing main advantages: High productivity, less power consumption, work more stable, small vibration crushing ratio, product granularity is more uniform, any side can give ore, and can be crowded to ore.

Jaw crusher main advantages: simple structure, low manufacturing cost, convenient maintenance, reliable work, small machine height, easy to configuration, high viscosity for the water ore is not easy to block.

Cone crushing equipment main disadvantages: Complex structure, equipment high costs, height. And need a higher workshop, machine heavy, inconvenient to transport, not suitable for crushing sticky ore, operation and maintenance more complex.

Fine jaw crusher is more used as a secondary crusher machine. It can crush the materials below 200mm to cm level. two jaw crushers can be equipped with the complete crushing production line. The single machine capacity of fine jaw breaking is low, and the breaking capacity of less than 100 tph can only be obtained by means of parallel connection of two machines.

Cone crusher as second-level crushing equipment, single machine crushing capacity of several hundred tons per hour. It occupies the absolute advantage in production capacity. Therefore, the fine jaw crusher can only be used in the secondary crushing station with small capacity. The cone crusher can be used in the secondary crushing station with a large capacity.

The matching of jaw crusher and cone crusher is based on the crushing segmentation. It is necessary to consider whether the particle size of jaw crusher can enter the cone crusher to form secondary crushing. For example, Compound Cone crusher configured in the back process of jaw crusher. The jaw crusher equipment broken too large discharge will plug the cone crusher feed mouth. Resulting crusher plant can not run smoothly.

For the matching of jaw crusher and cone crusher. It is necessary to compare the particle size range of the two materials. And adopt to the best matching range can obtain the most efficient production running state.

Jiangxi Shicheng stone crusher manufacturer is a new and high-tech factory specialized in R&D and manufacturing crushing lines, beneficial equipment,sand-making machinery and grinding plants. Read More

evaluation of size reduction process for rock aggregates in cone crusher | springerlink

The size reduction process of rocks in cone crushers is one of the most important issues, particularly for the secondary and tertiary stages of crushing operations. In this study, 17 different rock types were considered for the evaluation of their size reduction variations that occurred in a laboratory-scale cone crusher. Based on several mineralogical, physico-mechanical, and aggregate properties determined for each rock type, the crushability tests were performed.

Before and after the crushability tests, particle size distribution (PSD) of the uncrushed (feed) and crushed (product) materials were determined by sieve analyses. On the basis of these PSDs, the degree of rock crushability (DRC) was attempted to quantify by simple approaches (i.e., size reduction ratio, SRR, and the theoretical square mesh aperture size that corresponds to the 10% of the cumulative undersize in the product, P10 (mm)).

The crushability test results demonstrated that the DRC in cone crusher could be quantified by focusing on the variations in the SRR and P10. The SRR and P10 are associated with three important rock properties, Shore hardness (SH), Los Angeles abrasion loss (LAA, %), and Brazilian tensile strength (BTS, MPa). The textural and mineralogical features of rocks also have substantial impacts on the DRC for several rock types. It was concluded that the combination of the SRR and P10 could be considered together for the evaluation of DRC in cone crushers. Moreover, further research potentials on the DRC were also discussed in this study.

Cai M, Kaiser PK, Tasaka Y, Maejima T, Morioka H, Minami M (2004) Generalized crack initiation and crack damage stress thresholds of brittle rock masses near underground excavations. Int J Rock Mech Min Sci 41:833847. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijrmms.2004.02.001

Dahl F, Bruland A, Jakobsen PD, Nilsen B, Grov E (2012) Classifications of properties influencing the drillability of rocks based on NTNU/SINTEF test method. Tunneling and Underground Space Technol 28:150158. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tust.2011.10.006

Donovan J. G. (2003) Fracture toughness based models for the prediction of power consumption, product size, and capacity of jaw crushers, Dissertation, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and State University, 211 pp.

Eberhardt E., Stimson B. and Stead D. (1999) Effects of grain size on the initiation and propagation thresholds of stress-induced brittle fractures, Rock Mech. Rock Eng 32(2) 8199, https://doi.org/10.1007/s006030050026

Gent M, Menendez M, Torano J, Torno S (2012) A correlation between Vickers hardness indentation values and the Bond Work Index for the grinding of brittle minerals. Powder Technol 224:217222. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.powtec.2012.02.056

Hugman RHH, Friedman M (1979) Effects of texture and composition on mechanical behavior of experimentally deformed carbonate rocks. AAPG Bull 63(9):14781489. https://doi.org/10.1306/2F9185C7-16CE-11D7-8645000102C1865D

Kekec B, Unal M, Sensogut C (2006) Effect of textural properties of rocks on their crushing and grinding features. J Univ Sci Technol Beijing 13(5):385392. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1005-8850(06)60079-0

Kken E, zarslan A (2018) New testing methodology for the quantification of rock crushability: compressive crushing value (CCV). Int J Miner Metall Mater 25(11):12271236. https://doi.org/10.1007/s12613-018-1675-7

Korman T, Bedekovic G, Kujundzic T, Kuhinek D (2015) Impact of physical and mechanical properties of rocks on energy consumption of jaw crusher. Physicochem Probl Miner Process 51(2):461475. https://doi.org/10.5277/ppmp150208

Mitchell C.J, Mitchell P. and Pascoe R.D. (2008) Quarry fines minimization: can we really have 10 mm aggregates with no fines? Proceedings of the 14th Extractive Industry Geology Conference, Scott P.W. and Walton G. (Eds), 3744, http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/4932

Terva J, Kuokkala VT, Valtonen K, Siitonen P (2018) Effects of compression and sliding on the wear and energy consumption in mineral crushing. Wear 398399:116126. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.wear.2017.12.004

Tugrul A, Zarif IH (1999) Correlation of mineralogical and textural characteristics with engineering properties of selected granitic rocks from Turkey. Eng Geol 51:303317. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0013-7952(98)00071-4

Ylmaz NG (2011) Abrasivity assessment of granitic building stones in relation to diamond tool wear rate using mineralogy-based rock hardness indexes. Rock Mech Rock Eng 44:725733. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00603-011-0166-1

The author is greatly indebted to Dr. Rait Altnda (Sleyman Demirel University, Turkey) and Dr. Ahmet zarslan (Zonguldak Blent Ecevit University, Turkey) for providing laboratory facilities and their help during laboratory studies. The author also appreciates the constructive comments and suggestions of the anonymous reviewers that improved the manuscript.