desert mining drywasher or trommel

gold prospecting equipment | gold prospector - gold prospecting mining equipment detectors snake protection

Gold prices have TRIPLED in the last 10 years and the long-term price trends still point up, so there's never been a better time to find your own! And the best part is that you can find and recover placer gold in numerous ways with a variety of affordable equipment and supplies found on this website that will meet your needs and your budget.

We strive to bring all these new products to you on this website. Whether you're gold panning or want to use a sluice or a highbanker in a stream, or a drywasher in arid regions, or a trommel that moves lots of material, or a gold panning machine to save your muscles, or a gold detector, you will find lots of choices and information.

What is a placer mining claim? The offical definition is "all forms or deposit, except veins of quartz, or other rock in-place." In other words, any deposit not located in a lode deposit. It is a piece of publicly accessible federal land that is open for mineral entry and claiming. Filing a mining claim with the Bureau of Land Management gives you the right to extract the minerals on the claim, but does not give you exclusive rights to the property itself. In the Lower 48, the maximum size of a mining claim is 20 acres per person.

Remember that federal, state or local guidelines and regulations may differ from location to location, so be aware of the rules before you prospect anywhere. There's still plenty of gold to be found (U.S. Geological Surveys estimate that 33,000 metric tons-- nearly 1.2 billion ounces-- await discovery, mostly in the western USA), so get out there and get your share!

DID YOU KNOW? The market price of gold is based on 1 troy ounce of pure gold. In every ounce, there is 480 grains, 20 pennyweight or 31.104 grams. Since gold has gotten so valuable, it has become necessary to weigh it down to a fraction of a grain. Every grain counts and every grain is valuable, so before you go to sell your gold, weigh it carefully on a sensitive digital scale that can register to at least one-tenth of a gram.

The spot price of gold is the official price of gold at any given moment and can vary between different sources of data. The most common quoted spot price comes from the London P.M. or afternoon fix gold spot price, actually set during the morning hours in the United States, around 9:00 am Eastern Standard Time. The London PM fix, of all the gold spot prices, is the price at which the world's largest size gold purchases and sales are accomplished on any given day. This is the one price of gold in US dollars which is quoted daily, and familiarly, around the world. During the U.S. trading day, the spot price is usually based on the latest Comex spot gold price. This is a constantly changing price from the New York markets, and trading goes on until about 2:00 p.n. Eastern time.

Chunky nuggets, gleaming flakes, fine flour gold... all forms of the shiny stuff have been valued since the dawn of time as a store of wealth, and gold continues to be the most solid medium of exchange in the world. No matter the size or type, or whether you find it in a stream or out in the desert, gold is the noblest of metals and having the right gold mining equipment makes recovery easier, more profitable, and lots more fun!

Luckily for all of us, modern-day prospectors and manufacturers are constantly inventing new and innovative equipment and supplies to make gold recovery much easier than it was during the Gold Rush days of the '49ers!

gold prospecting and gold mining equipment - gold prospecting mining equipment detectors snake protection

Whether you're a part-time prospector, dedicated metal detectorist or rockhound, there has never been a better time to get involved in the modern day Gold Rush! Not only is treasure hunting a hobby that can pay you back, it's an activity the entire family can enjoy together in the great outdoors.

Perhaps one of the best benefits of gold prospecting and metal detecting is that with the price of gold today, you don't have to find much to completely pay for your equipment-- and the rest is pure profit! Thanks for shopping with us today! RememberFREE shipping to Lower 48 states on any order of $350 or more and NO SALES TAX! International shipping information here.

In the words of Tom Massie, star of the Outdoor Channel's Gold Fever, "... my favorite way of prospecting is the way that gets me gold." Suction dredging with a wetsuit can be quite lucrative not only from the material you suck up but there's also the chance of picking nuggets out of a crack in the bedrock.

Highbanking along the shore is a bit warmer and dryer, but just as fun. As is gold panning in a stream. Drywashing out in the desert surrounded by sunshine and solitude definitely has appeal. And so does uncovering buried treasure while metal detecting. And don't forget melting or smelting cell phone parts or old jewelry and coins. No matter your favorite way of finding gold, one thing is for certain, there's nothing quite like getting out there in the field or in the water and getting your share!

drywashers for gold

GOLD DRYWASHERS ARE BELOWSCROLL DOWN TO VIEWIn the past, most dry concentration was slow and inefficient. Even today, some dry washers have trouble recovering gold after the top layer of dry sand has been removed, due to the moist sand and gravel below the surface. New technological improvements allow modern units such as the 151 drywasher model made by Keene to help dry out this material and increase gold recovery to very high levels. Don't miss our drywashing books and videos - CLICK HEREWe offer many sizes - from compact drywasher models perfectly suited for the lone prospector, to larger units that can handle 3 people shoveling non stop.

Search Gold Fever Prospecting for: Sign up for The "Gold-Fever-Prospecting Newsletter" and we'll enter you for FREE into our monthly GOLD GIVE AWAY! Join the Gold Fever Prospecting mailing list Email: Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Search Gold Fever Prospecting for: Sign up for The "Gold-Fever-Prospecting Newsletter" and we'll enter you for FREE into our monthly GOLD GIVE AWAY! Join the Gold Fever Prospecting mailing list Email: Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Sign up for The "Gold-Fever-Prospecting Newsletter" and we'll enter you for FREE into our monthly GOLD GIVE AWAY! Join the Gold Fever Prospecting mailing list Email: Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Sign up for The "Gold-Fever-Prospecting Newsletter" and we'll enter you for FREE into our monthly GOLD GIVE AWAY! Join the Gold Fever Prospecting mailing list Email: Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Join the Gold Fever Prospecting mailing list Email: Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Copyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

gold prospecting equipment at kellyco | gold panning supplies

Having the right gold prospecting equipment will change your entire approach to this fun hobby. With the right equipment, your chances of finding this precious metal is much greater than having the bare minimum. With several key items included in any gold panning kit, being aware of the best items to have within your budget will help ensure you have a successful gold prospecting hunt.

With a wide range of gold prospecting equipment for sale, you certainly dont want to be wasting money purchasing the wrong items. At Kellyco, we have you covered for every circumstance and any budget. As a result, there are a number of different items that we believe should form the basis of any treasure hunter kit.

This hobby doesnt need an individual to have a wide range of mining equipment. Instead, gold prospecting can be easily achieved on a small budget while still enjoying the exciting experience of gold panning.

Looking through the pages of gold prospecting equipment, you may feel confused as to what is worth spending your money on. However, we feel that there are some key items that should form the basis of any gold prospecting kits.

The exact items will depend on how serious you want to take gold prospecting. If you love the idea of dredging rivers or streams to see how much gold you can uncover, then we have the equipment that you will need to do just that. Also, if the idea of some gentle gold panning or metal detecting is more up your street, then we have you covered as well.

First, if you love the idea of covering rivers and streams to uncover any gold that may lie in the water or bed, then a dredger would be important. This item comes with a motor, sluice, classifier, and suction hose to bring up the material from the bottom and to then be sorted through.

At Kellyco, we stock each individual component that would be required to either establish your dredging kit or to replace items that may be tired or require updating. From a wide array of suction hoses to attach to your power jet, to a variety of engines with different HP, our team of gold prospecting experts will be able to advise you on the best equipment to purchase for your bounty hunting adventures.

Of course, for those who are beginners with gold prospecting there are more inexpensive ways to build your kit. A simple gold panning kit costs very little and yet it is a wonderful way for someone to be introduced to the joys of gold panning. But, if you want to invest some extra money, then there are several items that should be on any list.

First, you need to consider if you wish to use a water sluice or a drywasher. As the name suggests, a drywasher uses alternative methods in that it focuses on air to separate the gold from other debris. Also, having a range of classifying meshes to hand can help you quickly sort through debris and be left with pure gold at the end of it all.

Of course, you may be drawn to the idea of gold prospecting with a metal detector, and that is an area where we certainly excel. With several options available, we have several gold detectors and search coils from manufacturers such as Whites, Nokta Makro, and Fisher.

However, dont break your budget on a gold detector, there are several cheap gold detectors at great quality. With every type of gold detector, no matter the budget, you will be able to distinguish between rocks, debris, other metals, and the gold itself. It does most of the hard work for you allowing you to simply enjoy the act of uncovering the gold.

For those just starting out with gold prospecting, we also have a number of kits that can be used as a way of an introduction. From the Minelab gold panning kit complete with a riffle pan and classifier, to Garrett producing their own sets, some of the biggest names in the industry understand exactly what you need when searching for gold panning equipment.

We know that you may have a number of questions surrounding what to buy and whether or not certain items are worthy of the investment. If this sounds like you, then make life easier for yourself by giving us a call here at Kellyco. A member of our team of expert detectorists will be happy to advise you on the best items to purchase that will allow you to get started with gold prospecting.

recovering fine gold with a drywasher - gold prospecting mining equipment detectors snake protection

Given a choice, most miners prefer using water to wash and run material, but in some dry, remote areas that is just not feasible. If you focus on the natural conditions that exist in desert regions and work with them, you can maximize fine gold recovery. The number one rule is that the drier the soil, the better. Damp soil conditions are very much a hindrance for drywashers. Beyond that, learning the different soil types you may encounter in the desert and how to deal with them can increase your gold recovery.

Clay is generally known as a great gold robber, making clay-bound gravels the biggest difficulty to overcome. In most of the placers directly derived from weathering lode deposits, the placers are in ravines, gullies and hillsides with sometimes very little gravels and mostly decomposed fragment of rock and fine silt from the decomposing host rock. Host rock containing a lot of feldspars are most problematic. As feldspar breaks down, it creates some difficult clays and silts that bind fine gold to small rocks and sand with the clay and silt particles forming larger clods.

Loamy or sandy conditions are much easier to process with a drywasher than clay-bound material due to the absence of clods and clumps. But if dirt clods are giving you grief, break them down with a large hammer on a canvas tarp, or use a mortar and pestle (dolly pot).

Once you are set up to run material, process in short runs before cleaning out the riffle tray (perhaps after every three 5-gallon buckets). Frequent clean ups minimize the amount of fine gold that may creep or walk down the riffle tray with the tailings. This method uses your dry washer as a form of a classifier to screen off larger material while getting rid of much of the fine silt and lighter weight material.

Re-running tailings can aid in the recovery of lost gold especially small gold dust and flakes. The second pass through is usually much quicker than the first time because the material has already been classified. With some placers, especially flat, fine gold, rerunning material can be very lucrative. In places where gold is more coarse and angular, very little gold will like be recovered by running the tailings a second time.

You may want to experiment with adding a second layer of cloth to a portion of the riffle tray. Doing so reduces airflow by almost half in that section. In addition to the riffle tray, the void under the riffle tray can collect a sizable amount of really fine gold mixed in with fine silt.

No doubt there are going to be losses of gold when using a drywasher to recover fine gold (20 minus mesh down into the 200 minus gold), but the end goal should be to limit those losses as much as possible and these tips should help. Good luck! Learn more about Gold Buddy drywashers here.

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drywashers gold mining

In arid districts where water is scarce or expensive and a dry plant is proposed for the recovery of placer gold, a small dry washer may be the logical choice for processing samples. A number of small, hand-powered machines are on the market and most work quite well within certain limits common to all dry washers used in gold mining.

First, consider two identical gold particles, one in a dry washer and the other submerged in water. It will be shown that the relative weight of the dry gold particle is substantially less than its wet counterpart. This is illustrated by the following equations in which the specific gravity of gold is 19, the specific gravity of gravel 2.65, and the specific gravity of water is 1:

This shows the gold to be eleven times heavier than gravel when immersed in water, as compared to 7: 1 in air. Simply stated the relative weight of gold is about 1 times greater when passing through a wet process than when passing through a dry washer. The lesser ratio in air is not too apparentwhen processing coarse or shotty gold but it no doubt contributes to the dry washers often poor recovery of fine or flaky gold.

To respond to dry washing the material treated must be almost completely dry. In most cases 3 percent moisture is considered a maximum. The goldparticles must also be completely liberated and free of cementing material such as caliche. In addition, effective separation is usually dependent on use of a closely-sized feed, sometimes not larger than screen-size. One might say that the amenability of a dry placer to working by the usual (dry) methods varies in proportion to its suitability to sizing by screening.

Besides the well-known difficulties related to drying placer material prior to dry washing and using small-mesh screens, there are other problems less generally appreciated. Wilson and Fansett in referring to tests made at the University of Arizona sum these up by saying:

A dry concentrator will not make as high recovery as a wet concentrator. Under favorable conditions, the recovery will be approximately ten to fifteen percent less with a dry machine as compared with a wet machine.

This tells us that in cases where a dry processing plant is proposed for the recovery of gold in a commercial-scale placer operation, it might he advisable to process the initial samples with a small dry washer. Figure 19 illustrates a type of machine found suitable for this purpose. If all else is equal, the recovery obtained from the dry (sample) washer should indicate the recovery to be expected from the full-scale operation. On the other hand, if the samples are washed in a rocker or other wet device, a suitable recovery correction factor may have to be applied to the indicated sample values.

Equipment used for the recovery of placer gold has changed very little over the years and, in general, remains relatively simple. Most devices employ some form of riffled surface to hold the gold or other heavy mineral after it has beenseparated from the valueless material. The actual separation relies on the ability of heavy minerals to resist the action of moving water while the lighter materials are carried away. In dry washers where a current of air is used as the transporting medium, the same principle applies. Although many have tried, no one to date has devised a gold-saving device or system which can economically replace the ordinary riffled sluices or placer jigs used on todays dredges or in other comparable large-scale placer operations. It is true that sluices may lose some of the fine gold but his is normally offset by their low operating cost and their high unit capacity which combine to return the greatest dollar profit.

When selecting a machine for washing and concentrating placer samples, the first consideration should be whether or not it will indicate the commercially recoverable gold content of the sample. Other desirable features would be:

It should again be stressed that no dredge or other large-scale placer equipment saves 100 percent of the values and because of this it is important that the sample washing process indicate the actual returns to be expected from a commercial operation. In this connection it is noteworthy that the pan, rocker, and the sluice when used by experienced placer operators fulfill this requirement.

A variety of small mechanical gold washers have been manufactured and put on the market over the years and although most were intended to be used for small-scale mining operations, some were advertised and sold as prospecting or sampling units. The typical machine consists of a small trommel screen with a feed hopper for shoveling in, a short sluice (which is usually provided with a shaking motion or some kind of special riffle), a pump, and a water distribution system, all run by a small gasoline engine. The typical machine weighs more than 500 pounds and requires a pickup truck or a trailer for transportation. Most are no longer manufactured and have passed from the scene but two of the better-known machines are still on the market.

These are manufactured and known as the Denver Mechanical Gold Pan and the Denver Gold Saver respectively. The mechanical pan has been well received in the industry over a 30-year period and is generally referred to simply as a Denver Pan. It comprises an assembly of three shallow, nested pans 2 feet in diameter with two superimposed screens arranged to wash and reject the plus -inch material. The combined assembly is mounted on a horizontally gyrating base driven by a small gasoline engine and the resultant motion is said to duplicate hand panning. The minus -inch material after passing through the screens, progressively flows over the three pans, one discharging into the next. The uppermost pan is provided with an amalgamating plate, and the two successive pans with special rubber mats or cocoa matting held down by coarse wire screen. Capacity of a single unit ranges up to 2 cubic yards per hour and water consumption is said to be as little as 1 to 2 parts (by weight) per part of gravel which would indicate an average of about 1,000 gallons per cubic yard. Single or double units are available and these can be provided with a scrubber and a trommel-type screen. The largest (Duplex) unit when so equipped has a rated capacity of 4 to 6 bank-run yards per hour and weighs 2100 pounds. The single (Simplex) unit without the trommel weighs 675 pounds. The Denver Mechanical Gold Pan is sturdily built and is suitable for continuous use such as would he encountered in a mining operation.

The Denver Equipment Companys second machine, sold under the name of Denver Gold Saver, is well suited for general sampling work in that it can be quickly and easily cleaned thus eliminating the danger of carry-over of values from one sample to the next. It consists of a feed hopper, a combined scrubber and trommel to wash and screen out the plus -inch material, a special vibrating molded rifle, a reserve water storage tank and a centrifugal pump with suitable piping sprays, etc., all powered by a 1 HP gasoline engine. The complete assembly weighs 750 pounds and has a rated capacity of 2 to 3 cubic yards per hour.

Perhaps the most widely used dry recovery technique is dry washing gold, using a dry washer. The dry washer is basically a short, waterless sluice. It separates gold from sand by pulsations of air through a porous medium. Screened gravel passes down an inclined riffle box with cross riffles. The bottom of the box consists of canvas or some other fabric. Beneath the riffle box is a bellows, which blows air in short, strong puffs through the canvas. This gives a combined shaking and classifying action to the material. The gold gravitates down to the canvas and is held by the riffles, while the waste passes over the riffles and out of the machine.

A basic dry washer is composed of a frame in which a well-braced, heavy screen is covered with burlap overlain with window or fly screen and covered with fine linen. Above this, riffles made of one-half to three-quarter-inch, half-round moulding or metal screen are placed 4 to 6inches apart. The slope of the box varies from 4 to 6 inches per foot (Figure 11). If amalgamation of flour gold is desired, pockets to hold mercury are constructed in front of the riffles. A power washer of this type can process up to 21 cubic feet (approximately 0.8 cubic yards) of screened material an hour. Hand-powered washers operated by two men can process 1 or more cubic yards per 8 hours, depending on the size of the material handled.

For recovery of gold, the ore must be completely dry and disintegrated. If the ore is slightly damp below the surface, it must be dried before treatment. For small-scale work, sun drying will dry material about as fast as it can be processed. In operation, dry ore is fed into the vibrating screen of the dry washer where the fines fall through to the riffles and the oversize falls off the edge. The bellows and screen are operated by hand cranking or powered by a small engine. The bellows should be operated at about 250 pulsations per minute with a stroke of about 3 inches. These figures will vary with the coarseness of processed material and the fineness of the gold. Operation continues until about one cubic yard of material has been processed.

During cleanup, the riffle box is lifted out and turned over onto a large flat surface. The concentrates from the upper three riffles are first panned, and the gold removed. Usually the coarse and some fine gold can be saved here. The lower riffles may contain a few colors, but nearly all the recovered gold is caught in the upper riffles. The concentrates from the dry washer are further refined by panning or other means. If water is very scarce, the concentrates my be concentrated in the dry washer a second time and further cleaned by blowing away the lighter grains in a pan. Dry washers are portable, inexpensive, and easy to use. As with all dry placer methods, a large percentage of very fine gold is lost.

Dry washing usually has failed or been indifferently successful in this country. Winnowing as practiced in Western Australia, where the sand is very dry and there are strong prevailing winds, has not worked well here because of retained moisture in the sands and because of insufficient wind. For successful dry washing, the gravel must be completely dry and thoroughly disintegrated. Machines similar to

that shown in figure 122 consist of screens and flat-sloping, riffled canvas decks, under which air pulsations are produced by bellows or other means to agitate the sand and work it down the deck over the riffles, the gold and other heavy minerals being caught behind the riffles. The machine illustrated was operated to give 250 pulsations of air per minute, and the capacity was reported to be about 0.8 cubic yard per hour, bank measure.

building the ultimate dry washer - diy projects - nugget shooter forums

Last year I started a project to build a custom Dry Washer in order to process much larger quantity's of material while also improving efficiency as much as possible to retain all gold fed into it. That project was completed last night except for the final feed hopper that is still in design.

Very slow at processing gravel and the gravel must be pre screened down to 1/4" minus. Material must be run twice or more. Poor riffle design and riffles are poorly sealed against gold migrating to one end and going under and around the riffles while following the sluice side. The method of vibration rotating parallel to the sluice induces a rotational vibration that forces heavies to one side of the sluice where it piles up and starts to walk over the riffles. Steel riffle trays are heavy and poorly fitted to the box allowing paths around or under the riffles for fine gold to be lost. No air control other than motor speed so more vibration also means more air through the cloth which is not always desired. No dead space behind riffles to let the heavies settle out and stay in place. All riffles are made the exact same as well as air flow up through them.

To make the thing light and strong the entire thing is made of 6061 T6.5 aluminum sheet and plate including the riffles. The punch plate is 3/16" aluminum and machined for air movement in front of each riffle in varying amounts as well as the dead space behind each riffle varies. The height of the riffles vary as do their spacing. In the rear of the box is an air damper that can be adjusted for air flow. The surface of the punch plate is machined flat as is the bottom and sides of the riffle tray for an air tight seal when closed. There are other mods also including a totally different approach to vibration that prevents gold from shaking to one side of the box but I'm not willing to tell how yet in case it has commercial value.

Tried the box out last night with fine and coarse lead mixed into a bucket of actual wash material brought home from the last trip for just this testing purpose with 100% recovery on all 4 runs as well as quite a bit of gold I did not know was in the dirt on the first run. No gold was found in the following runs of the bucket. It runs the material faster than my 151 also.

The way I understand it after all these years is that if you hold the valid claim, all minerals contained on it (surface gravels for placer and bedrock materials for hard rock) are yours to remove pursuant to the plan or notice agreements with the governing agency involved. Dry washers are looked at somewhat favorably with FS and BLM as doing minimal disturbances and my contacts with Prescott FS resulted in no plan being required for our intended operations. I know of no rules that says I can't remove the pay gravels and process them at my "facility" of choice. When doing so though I do keep a copy of my claim papers with me to help prove my story of the materials source being legal for me to have in possession.

I think your title-"Building the Ultimate Dry Washer, A Dry Washer that equals a dredge in recovery rates" is somewhat misleading. There's simply no way you can build drywasher that will equal the recovery rate of a dredge 100% of the time. It all depends what area you're in, what size gold if found as well the type of ground. It may get 100% in some areas but far less in others.

Very slow at processing gravel and the gravel must be pre screened down to 1/4" minus. Material must be run twice or more. Poor riffle design and riffles are poorly sealed against gold migrating to one end and going under and around the riffles while following the sluice side. The method of vibration rotating parallel to the sluice induces a rotational vibration that forces heavies to one side of the sluice where it piles up and starts to walk over the riffles. Steel riffle trays are heavy and poorly fitted to the box allowing paths around or under the riffles for fine gold to be lost. No air control other than motor speed so more vibration also means more air through the cloth which is not always desired. No dead space behind riffles to let the heavies settle out and stay in place. All riffles are made the exact same as well as air flow up through them.

To make the thing light and strong the entire thing is made of 6061 T6.5 aluminum sheet and plate including the riffles. The punch plate is 3/16" aluminum and machined for air movement in front of each riffle in varying amounts as well as the dead space behind each riffle varies. The height of the riffles vary as do their spacing. In the rear of the box is an air damper that can be adjusted for air flow. The surface of the punch plate is machined flat as is the bottom and sides of the riffle tray for an air tight seal when closed. There are other mods also including a totally different approach to vibration that prevents gold from shaking to one side of the box but I'm not willing to tell how yet in case it has commercial value.

Tried the box out last night with fine and coarse lead mixed into a bucket of actual wash material brought home from the last trip for just this testing purpose with 100% recovery on all 4 runs as well as quite a bit of gold I did not know was in the dirt on the first run. No gold was found in the following runs of the bucket. It runs the material faster than my 151 also.

While I agree that it's a pretty tough thing to accomplish I don't agree for a minute that its not possible. The changes in construction done to this unit has vastly improved its efficiency over other I've used. So far, so good and even more testing in real field situations will start this weekend. As it is now it's pretty darn close to a dredge of equal size.

Great idea and machine work. As a former gunsmith, I still wish I had my lathe and other equipment. Sold it all when I moved from Idaho to Arizona. Let us know how it works in the field. I'm betting pretty darn good results !!

That road is one of the better ones into good spots. LOL Next time in there I'll be taking 4, 55gal drums of water along with and drive all the way in in my rig. You will be welcome to come in and play for the weekend also.

You boys are silly! You know darn well I can't afford one of those after affording the drywasher! lol. I have been drying some dirt from a recent trip but now that christmas break is over, I get home so late, it's too darn cold!

By the way Bob... you don't have to scam me for a fishing trip. Your always welcome. Just have to catch me with money and time. At this particular moment it's honestly too cold lol. I am a big wimp. But when it warms up I'll be getting back into it. I don't ever catch anything but a buzz anyways. :ph34r2:

By the way Bob... you don't have to scam me for a fishing trip. Your always welcome. Just have to catch me with money and time. At this particular moment it's honestly too cold lol. I am a big wimp. But when it warms up I'll be getting back into it. I don't ever catch anything but a buzz anyways. :ph34r2:

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Given a choice, most miners prefer using water to wash and run material, but in some dry, remote areas that is just not feasible. If you focus on the natural conditions that exist in desert regions and work with them, you can maximize fine gold recovery. The number one rule is that the drier the soil, the better. Damp soil conditions are very much a hindrance for drywashers. Beyond that, learning the different soil types you may encounter in the desert and how to deal with them can increase your gold recovery.

Clay is generally known as a great gold robber, making clay-bound gravels the biggest difficulty to overcome. In most of the placers directly derived from weathering lode deposits, the placers are in ravines, gullies and hillsides with sometimes very little gravels and mostly decomposed fragment of rock and fine silt from the decomposing host rock. Host rock containing a lot of feldspars are most problematic. As feldspar breaks down, it creates some difficult clays and silts that bind fine gold to small rocks and sand with the clay and silt particles forming larger clods.

Loamy or sandy conditions are much easier to process with a drywasher than clay-bound material due to the absence of clods and clumps. But if dirt clods are giving you grief, break them down with a large hammer on a canvas tarp, or use a mortar and pestle (dolly pot).

Once you are set up to run material, process in short runs before cleaning out the riffle tray (perhaps after every three 5-gallon buckets). Frequent clean ups minimize the amount of fine gold that may creep or walk down the riffle tray with the tailings. This method uses your dry washer as a form of a classifier to screen off larger material while getting rid of much of the fine silt and lighter weight material.

Re-running tailings can aid in the recovery of lost gold especially small gold dust and flakes. The second pass through is usually much quicker than the first time because the material has already been classified. With some placers, especially flat, fine gold, rerunning material can be very lucrative. In places where gold is more coarse and angular, very little gold will like be recovered by running the tailings a second time.

You may want to experiment with adding a second layer of cloth to a portion of the riffle tray. Doing so reduces airflow by almost half in that section. In addition to the riffle tray, the void under the riffle tray can collect a sizable amount of really fine gold mixed in with fine silt.

No doubt there are going to be losses of gold when using a drywasher to recover fine gold (20 minus mesh down into the 200 minus gold), but the end goal should be to limit those losses as much as possible and these tips should help. Good luck! Learn more about Gold Buddy drywashers here.

With the weather turning colder, you might think you're done prospecting 'til next summer, but you don't have to be! Even if you're not a regular snowbird heading to a warmer climate for the next few months, you can take a short desert vacation some time this coming winter, and turn it into a lucrative gold prospecting trip, too.

Gold mining in the desert is especially enjoyable if you're not into crowds the desert can be delightfully smog free and people free in the winter. Experts say there is just as much gold waiting to be taken out of the desert as there is commonly found in streams and rivers. Why? Well, throughout history the desert mines just never got the publicity that wet places like California's Mother Lode did, so fewer prospectors went there. Plus, back in the day, mining used to be harder in dry conditions. Luckily that's no longer true if you have the right equipment.

If you're used to highbanking in the summer, give drywashing a try this winter. Old-timers used the wind to separate their gold from the sand by tossing the gravel up in the air and catching it in a blanket. The gold, being heavier, fell in the blanket, while the wind blew away the sand. Using a modern portable drywasher is a lot easier!

Metal detecting is another great way to hunt for gold in the desert. Gold detectors are not necessarily higher in cost, but they are built with a higher sensitivity to detecting gold nuggets, and have better ground balancing and discrimination abilities.

A bonus of prospecting in the desert is the abundance of interesting rocks. You can find many unusual rocks and semi-precious gems such as tourmaline, turquoise, agate, jasper, and more. Lapidary shops can cut and polish the rocks for you, or buy your own rock tumbler and lapidary tools and learn a new hobby.

Some say that "gold is where you find it" and while that may be true, once you arrive at a known gold-bearing location, how do you decide where to dig first? Successful prospectors follow different methods, so there is no single "right" way, but no matter if you are sluicing, dry washing, or metal detecting, if you first consider the "lay of the land" you can better pinpoint a place to start.

Man-Made Factors to Consider Before Digging for Gold: The sites of small, old-time mining operations can be some of the best places to look for gold. After all, the old-timers didn't have the modern-day equipment that you have, so they left a lot behind. Depending on their age, these sites from yesteryear can be overgrown, but if you look for these indicators they will help you consider where to dig first:

Deciding where to dig first comes from knowledge. You get that knowledge from reading books and magazines dedicated to prospecting and metal detecting, talking with experienced old-timers, and GETTING OUT IN THE FIELD. Evaluate the area, think about the geology, and then make a plan before you dig. You may not always hit upon a promising location by considering the factors listed above, but your chances for success greatly increase. Be flexible, keep sampling, and try again if you don't have any luck at first. Spending a little time evaluating an area can lead to a much more productive hunt, because after all, "gold is where you find it."

Dry washers are like highbankers except they do not use water to recover gold. While wet processing is nearly always faster and more efficient, especially for fine gold, dry washers are the best tool for recovering gold nuggets, pickers, and flakes from dry materials in the desert or other areas where water is not plentiful. Drywashers are operated by shoveling gold-bearing gravels into an upper box which is covered with a screen. The larger rocks that are too big to pass through the screen slide off. Gravel small enough to go through is fed down into the lower gold recovery box, which is an inclined trough with cross riffles much like a sluice. The bottom of the recovery box consists of a thin, light-weight porous cloth. Beneath the riffle box is a blower that pulses air up through the cloth. The vibrations and air flow, combined with the shaking and classifying action of the dry washer allows the gold to settle to the bottom where it is captured in the riffles.

Keep these tips and tricks in mind when using a dry washer: Moist soils and clay cause problems, so be sure to crush lumps of clay and dry your dirt in the sun (plastic tarps are ideal) before running through your dry washer. Surface soils might seem dry, but if you dig down a few inches, you may find moisture in the soil that will cause your sand, gravel, and gold to stick together.

Double-check all the "throw away" rocks. Scanning them with a metal detector is a great way to ensure you're not tossing aside gold-laden rocks. Also, don't assume old tailings piles have been totally worked out. This is another time to use a metal detector because ordinary rocks could be laced with gold and completely over-looked by earlier prospectors.

Drywashing can be a very dusty process, so try to stay upwind as much as possible and wear a dust mask. Do a clean up every couple of hours, or after processing roughly one to two yards of material. Looking for a drywasher? The Gold Buddy brand is available in 4 sizes and also check out the new heavy duty Gold Storm dry washer. Whichever you choose, SAVE $10 with coupon code TAKETEN at check out. Offer expires Dec. 31, 2103.

Drywashers are like highbankers, but they do not use water, making them excellent tools for recovering gold from dry material in desert areas. A dry washer is basically designed to be a waterless sluice. It separates gold from sand and other waste material with pulsations of air, vibrations, and static electricity instead of running water.

The top portion of a drywasher is called a hopper and consists of a box covered with wire screen. The screen is called a "grizzly." Dry gold-bearing material is fed onto the grizzly, which is mounted at a fairly steep angle. Thinner material, such as dirt and small gravel, falls through the grizzly screen and into the hopper. Larger material, such as rocks and sticks, roll off the grizzly and back onto the ground. Material from the hopper is then fed by gravity into the riffle tray below (looks like a sluice box), through an opening in the bottom of the hopper. The under side of the riffle tray consists of a piece of stretched cloth that allows air to pass through the bottom of the riffle tray. A fan is mounted inside the sluice box and spins as air is blown up through holes in the bottom, usually by a leaf blower or another source of compressed air. Mounted on the fan is a weight that throws the fan off balance when spinning, and vibrates the entire box. This additional vibration assists in forcing flour gold to the bottom to be trapped, whereas lighter material is blown off. Keep the following tips in mind, and you just might see the results of your drywashing efforts pay off even better: Moist soils and clay cause problems, so be sure to crush lumps of clay and dry your dirt in the sun (plastic tarps are ideal) before running through your dry washer. Surface soils might seem dry, but if you dig down a few inches, you may find moisture in the soil that will cause your sand, gravel, and gold to stick together. Double-check all the "throw away" rocks that get stuck in the grizzly before discarding. Scanning them with a metal detector is a great way to ensure you're not tossing aside gold-laden rocks. Another time to use your detector is on old tailings piles. These ordinary looking rocks could be laced with gold, yet were completely over-looked by earlier prospectors. Don't limited yourself to drywashing in "proven" areas. Because of the high costs associated with inaccessibility and lack of water, most desert regions have gone largely untouched by mining operations of yesteryear. A side benefit is that you don't have to go far off the beaten path. Virgin ground can be found in washes right off major roadways. Keep an eye on the terrain. Areas where the greatest amount of erosion has occurred are usually the areas where the highest concentration of gold values might be found. One of the best locations to look for gold is where the hills meet the desert and fan out. This is where flood waters from storms drop gold in the gullies and washes. There also may be more gold traps further up on hillsides. All it takes is one good storm to change the face of a desert landscape, so drywashing after a storm can potentially uncover previously hidden gold! Gold Buddy drywashers are made in the USA and available in four sizes Colt, Pony, Maverick, and Stallion. Each drywasher comes with a FREE "Working the Drywasher" instructional DVD, FREE shipping in most cases, and has a 5-year manufacturer's warranty.

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