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LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Rio Tinto and POSCO, the largest steel producer in South Korea and one of the worlds leading steel producers, have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to jointly explore, develop and demonstrate technologies to transition to a low-carbon emission steel value chain. The partnership will explore a range of technologies for decarbonisation across the entire stee

MELBOURNE--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Rio Tinto has appointed Isabelle Deschamps to succeed Barbara Levi as Chief Legal Officer & External Affairs. Isabelle, who is currently General Counsel of AkzoNobel and a member of the Executive Committee, will join Rio Tinto on 25 October 2021. Isabelle, a dual Canadian and UK citizen, has over 20 years experience in various senior legal roles across Europe

LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Rio Tinto has declared force majeure on customer contracts at Richards Bay Minerals (RBM) in South Africa due to an escalation in the security situation at the operations. This has led to the decision to cease operations until the safety and security position improves. Rio Tinto chief executive Minerals, Sinead Kaufman, said: The safety of our people is our top prio

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geometallurgy of cobalt ores: a review - sciencedirect

Cobalt (Co) is a transition metal featuring unique physical properties which makes its use critical for many high-tech applications such as high strength materials, magnets and most importantly, rechargeable batteries. The bulk of world cobalt output usually arises as a by-product of extracting other metals, mostly nickel (Ni) and copper (Cu), from a wide variety of deposit types mostly Cu-Co sediment-hosted deposits, but also Ni-Co laterites, Ni-Cu-Co sulphides or hydrothermal and volcanogenic deposits. Significant differences in ore properties (geochemistry, mineralogy, alteration and physical properties) exist between cobalt-containing deposits, as well as within a single deposit, which can host a range of ore types. Variability of cobalt ores makes it challenging to develop a single extraction or treatment process that will be able to accommodate all geometallurgical variation. Overall, there is a lack of fundamental knowledge on cobalt minerals and their processability. The recovery efficiency for cobalt is generally low, in particular for processes involving flotation and smelting, leading to significant cobalt losses to mine tailings or smelter slags. This paper starts by reviewing the main geometallurgical properties of cobalt ores, with a particular focus on ore mineralogy which exerts a significant control over ore processing behaviour and cobalt extraction, such as the oxidation state, i.e. oxide or sulphides which drives the selection of the processing route (leaching vs flotation), and the associated gangue mineralogy, which can affect acid consumption during leaching or flotation performance. The main processing routes and associated specific geometallurgical aspects of each deposit type are presented. The paper concludes on the future cobalt prospects, in terms of primary and secondary resources, cobalt processing and sustainable cobalt sourcing for which further research is needed.

the business value of best practice process mineralogy - sciencedirect

Modern Process Mineralogy has been making significant advances in methodology and data interpretation since it was assembled in the mid-1980s as a multi-disciplined team approach to obtaining mineralogical information from drill core and plant samples so as to infer the metallurgical processing requirements of that ore. This hybrid discipline consists of teams that include geologists, mineralogists, samplers, mineral processors and often others, working together. The degree of cross-training, communication and trust dictates the potential capacity of the team and it is possible to develop technical capabilities that surpass those of conventional teams. A pivotal tool for technically efficient and plant-oriented process mineralogy is, of course, the use of modern, automated laboratory technology. In these cases, process mineralogy, though associated with some capital investment, is a valuable risk reduction tool and an operations optimization tool for any mining company, not only in terms of finances but also in terms of human and intellectual capital. However, if the teams are dysfunctional and information is not interpreted correctly due to limited experience in the team or less than best practice, or it is not implemented or used, much of the value can be lost. Process Mineralogy can then be regarded as time consuming and expensive. In this paper, the business value of best practice Process Mineralogy is outlined and discussed. Case studies that include green fields new design applications and brown fields interventions to mature operations have been selected to demonstrate the tremendous financial value that can be achieved are presented, along with those where costly disasters could have been averted. The list is not intended to be exhaustive or complete, and the reader is referred to the extensive literature available. Examples are selected for this publication specifically to illustrate the delicate balance between generating additional business value through potentially expensive mineralogical analyses and the lost opportunities of underperforming flowsheets, unanticipated losses due to high feed variance, inadequate liberation or deleterious minerals, over-reagentised circuits, or extra costs of unnecessary or underutilised equipment.

energy use of fine grinding in mineral processing | springerlink

Fine grinding, to P80 sizes as low as 7m, is becoming increasingly important as mines treat ores with smaller liberation sizes. This grinding is typically done using stirred mills such as the Isamill or Stirred Media Detritor. While fine grinding consumes less energy than primary grinding, it can still account for a substantial part of a mills energy budget. Overall energy use and media use are strongly related to stress intensity, as well as to media size and quality. Optimization of grinding media size and quality, as well as of other operational factors, can reduce energy use by a factor of two or more. The stirred mills used to perform fine grinding have additional process benefits, such as polishing the mineral surface, which can enhance recovery.

Fine grinding is becoming an increasingly common unit operation in mineral processing. While fine grinding can liberate ores that would otherwise be considered untreatable, it can entail high costs in terms of energy consumption and media use. These costs can be minimized by performing adequate test work and selecting appropriate operating conditions. This paper reviews fine grinding technology, research, and plant experience and seeks to shed light on ways in which operators can reduce both operating costs and the environmental footprint of their fine grinding circuit.

This paper will begin by giving an overview of fine grinding and the equipment used. It will then discuss energyproduct size relationships and modeling efforts for stirred mills in particular. The paper will go on to cover typical test work requirements, the effect of media size, and the contained energy in media. In closing, specific case studies will be reviewed.

Grinding activities in general (including coarse, intermediate, and fine grinding) account for 0.5pct of U.S. primary energy use, 3.8pct of total U.S. electricity consumption, and 40pct of total U.S. mining industry energy use. Large energy saving opportunities have been identified in grinding in particular.[1]

TableI shows a very large disparity between the theoretical minimum energy used in grinding and the actual energy used. More interestingly, a fairly large difference remains even between Best Practice grinding energy use and current energy use. This suggests that large savings in grinding energy (and associated savings in maintenance, consumables, and capital equipment needed) could be obtained by improving grinding operations.

As fine grinding is typically used on regrind applications, the feed tonnages to fine grinding circuits are small compared to head tonnages, typically 10 to 30tph. However, the specific energies are often much larger than those encountered in intermediate milling and can be as high as 60kWh/t. Total installed power in a fine grinding circuit can range from several hundred kW to several MW; for example, the largest installed Isamill has 3MW installed power.[3] This quantity is small compared to the power used by a semi-autogenous mill and a ball mill in a primary grinding circuit; a ball mill can have an installed power of up to 15MW, while installed power for a SAG mill can go up to 25MW. However, the energy used for fine grinding is still significant. Moreover, as this paper seeks to demonstrate, large energy reduction opportunities are frequently found in fine grinding.

Grinding can be classified into coarse, intermediate, and fine grinding processes. These differ in the equipment used, the product sizes attained, and the comminution mechanisms used. The boundaries between these size classes must always be drawn somewhat arbitrarily; for this paper, the boundaries are as given in TableII. As shown in the table, coarse grinding typically corresponds to using an AG or SAG mill, intermediate grinding to a ball mill or tower mill, and fine grinding to a stirred mill such as an Isamill or Stirred Media Detritor (SMD). Of course, various exceptions to these typical values can be found.

In fine grinding, a material with an F80 of less than 100m is comminuted to a P80 of 7 to 30m. (P80s of 2m are at least claimed by equipment manufacturers.) The feed is typically a flotation concentrate, which is reground to liberate fine particles of the value mineral.

The three modes of particle breakage are impact; abrasion, in which two particles shear against each other; and attrition, in which a small particle is sheared between two larger particles or media moving at different velocities. In fine grinding, breakage is dominated by attrition alone.[4] In stirred mills, this is accomplished by creating a gradient in the angular velocity of the grinding media along the mills radius.

Fine grinding is usually performed in high-intensity stirred mills; several manufacturers of these stirred mills exist. Two frequently used stirred mills include the Isamill, produced by Xstrata Technology, and the SMD, produced by Metso (Figure1). A third mill, the KnelsonDeswik mill (now the FLS stirred mill), is a relative newcomer to the stirred milling scene, having been developed through the 1990s and the early 2000s.[5] In all these mills, a bed of ceramic or sand is stirred at high speed. Ceramic media sizes in use range from 1 to 6.5mm.

The Isamill and the SMD have very similar grinding performance. Grinding the same feed using the same media, Nesset et al.[7] found that the Isamill and SMD had very similar specific energy use. Gao et al.[8] observed that an Isamill and SMD, grinding the same feed with the same media, produced very similar product particle size distributions (PSDs). This similarity in performance has also been observed in other operations.

Nevertheless, there are important differences. In the Isamill, the shaft is horizontal and the media are stirred by disks, while in the SMD, the stirring is performed by pins mounted on a vertical shaft. In an SMD, the product is separated from the media by a screen; the Isamill uses an internal centrifugation system. This means that the screens in an SMD constitute a wear part that must be replaced, while for the Isamill, the seals between the shaft and body constitute important wear parts. Liner changes and other maintenance are claimed by Xstrata Technology to be much easier than in an SMD: While an SMDs liner is removed in eight parts, the Isamills liner can be removed in two pieces, with the shell sliding off easily.[3] The KnelsonDeswik mill is top stirred and can therefore be considered to be similar to an SMD.[5]

An important difference among the Isamill, the SMD, and the KnelsonDeswik mill is that of scale. The largest Isamill installed at time of writing had 3MW of installed power; an 8MW Isamill is available, but appears not to have yet been installed.[3] The largest SMD available has 1.1MW of installed power; one 1.1-MW SMD has been installed. The next largest size SMD has 355kW of installed power.[6] Thus, several SMDs are often installed for a fine grinding circuit, while the same duty would be performed by a single Isamill. SMDs are typically arranged in series, with the product of one becoming the feed for the other. This has the advantage that each SMD in the line can have its media and operating conditions optimized to the particle size of its particular feed. The largest installed power in a KnelsonDeswik mill is 699kW[5]; this places it in an intermediate position between the 355-kW and 1.1-MW SMDs.

In 2012, FLSmidth reported that it had acquired the KnelsonDeswik mill; the mill is now known as the FLSmidth stirred mill. An FLSmidth stirred mill will be installed to perform a copper concentrate regrind in Mongolia.[9] It is speculated that the mill will continue to be scaled up under its new owners to allow it to effectively compete against the SMD and Isamill.

Gravity-induced stirred (GIS) mills include the Tower mill, produced by Nippon Eirich, and the Vertimill, produced by Metso. Grinding to below 40m in GIS mills or ball mills is usually not recommended. In their product literature, Metso give 40m as the lower end of the optimal P80 range for Vertimills.[6] At lower product sizes, both tower mills and ball mills will overgrind fines. At Mt. Isa Mines, a GIS mill fed with material of F80 approximately 50m lowered the P80 size by only 5 to 10m, at the same time producing a large amount of fines.[10] Similarly, in ball mills, it is known that grinding finer than approximately 40m will result in overgrinding of fines as well as high media consumption. However, it must be noted that the product size to which a mill can efficiently grind depends on the feed material, the F80, and media type and size. A Vertimill has been used to grind to sizes below 10m.[11]

The phenomenon of overgrinding is largely the result of using media that are too large for the product size generated. The smallest ball size typically charged into ball mills and tower mills is inch (12.5mm), although media diameters as small as 6mm have been used industrially in Vertimills.[11]

In a laboratory study by Nesset et al.,[7] a GIS mill charged with 5-mm steel shot, and with other operating conditions similarly optimized, achieved high energy efficiencies when grinding to less than 20m. This appears to qualitatively confirm the notion that fine grinding requires smaller media sizes. In the case of the Nesset study, the power intensity applied to the laboratory tower mill was lowthat is, the shaft was rotated slowly in order to obtain this high efficiency, leading to low throughput. This suggests that charging GIS mills with small media may not be practicable in plant operation.

Millpebs have been used as grinding media to achieve fine grinding in ball mills. These are 5- to 12-mm spherical or oblong cast steel pellets, charged into ball mills as a replacement of, or in addition to, balls. While Millpebs can give significantly lower energy use when grinding to finer sizes, they also can lead to high fines production and high media use.

Millpebs were tested for fine grinding at the Brunswick concentrator. The regrind ball mills at the concentrator used 25-mm slugs to produce a P80 of 28m. In one of the regrind mills, the slugs were replaced by Millpebs; these were able to consistently maintain a P80 of 22m while decreasing the power draw by 20pct. However, media use increased by 50pct and the production of fines of less than 16m diameter increased by a factor of 5.[12] The observed drop in specific energy may be due to the fact that Millpebs had smaller average diameters than the slugs and so were more efficient at grinding to the relatively small product sizes required. It is therefore unclear whether the performance of Millpebs would be better than that of conventional 12-mm steel balls. To the best of the authors knowledge, no performance comparison between Millpebs and similarly sized balls has been performed.

A host of other technologies exist to produce fine grinding, including jet mills, vibrating mills, roller mills, etc. However, none of these technologies has reached the same unit installed power as stirred mills. For example, one of the largest vibrating mills has an installed power of 160kW.[13] Therefore, these mills are considered as filling niche roles and are not treated further in this review. A fuller discussion of other fine grinding technologies can be found in a review by Orumwense and Forssberg.[14]

Neese et al.[15] subjected 50- to 150-m sand contaminated with oil to cleaning in a stirred mill in the laboratory. The mill operated at low stress intensities: A low speed and small-size media (200- to 400-m quartz or steel beads) were used. These conditions allowed the particles to be attrited without being broken. As a result, a large part of the oil contaminants was moved to the 5-m portion of the product. This treatment may hold promise as an alternative means of processing bituminous sands, for example, in northern Alberta.

The Albion process uses ultrafine grinding to enhance the oxidation of sulfide concentrates in treating refractory gold ores.[16] In the process, the flotation concentrate is ground to a P80 of 10 to 12m. The product slurry is reacted with oxygen in a leach tank at atmospheric pressure; limestone is added to maintain the pH at 5 to 5.5. The leach reaction is autothermal and is maintained near the slurry boiling point. Without the fine grinding step, an autoclave would be required for the oxygen leaching process. It is hypothesized that the fine grinding enhances leach kinetics by increasing the surface area of the particles, as well as by deforming the crystal lattices of the particles.

Numerous researchers, for example, Buys et al.,[17] report that stirred milling increases downstream flotation recoveries by cleaning the surface of the particles. The grinding media used in stirred mills are inert, and therefore corrosion reactions, which occur with steel media in ball mills, are not encountered. Corrosion reactions change the surface chemistry of particles, especially with sulfide feeds, and hamper downstream flotation.

Further increases in flotation recoveries are obtained by limiting the amount of ultrafine particles formed; stirred mills can selectively grind the larger particles in the feed with little increase in ultrafines production. Ultrafine particles are difficult to recover in flotation.

In intermediate grinding to approximately 75m, the Bond equation (Eq. [1]) is used to relate feed size, product size, and mechanical energy applied. Below 75m, correction factors can be applied to extend its range of validity.[4]

No general work index formula governing energy use over a range of conditions, like the Bond equation for intermediate grinding, has yet been found for the fine grinding regime. Instead, the work-to-P80 curve is determined in the laboratory for each case. The energy use usually fits an equation of the form

Signature plot (specific energy vs P80 curve) for Brunswick concentrator Zn circuit ball mill cyclone underflow; F80=63m. The plots give results for grinding the same feed using different mills and media. After Nesset et al.[7]

Values for the exponent k have been found in the range 0.7 to 3.5, meaning that the work to grind increases more rapidly as grind size decreases than in intermediate grinding. The specific energy vs product size curve has a much steeper slope in this region than in intermediate grinding.

The values of k and A are specific to the grinding conditions used in the laboratory tests. Changes in feed size, media size distribution, and in other properties such as media sphericity and hardness can change both k and A, often by very large amounts. Media size and F80 appear to be the most important determinants of the signature plot equation.

The connections (if any) between k and A and various operating conditions remain unknown. Because of the relatively recent advent of stirred milling in mineral processing, fine grinding has not been studied to the same extent as grinding in ball mills (which of course entail much larger capital and energy expenditures in any case). One of the research priorities in the field of stirred milling should be the investigation of the effects of F80 and media size on the position of the signature plots. If analogous formulas to the Bond ball mill work formula and the Bond top ball size formula can be found, the amount of test work required for stirred milling would be greatly reduced.

Larson et al.[19] found that when specific energy is plotted against the square of the percent particles in the product passing a given size (a proxy for particle surface area), a straight line is obtained. This is demonstrated in Figure3.

In contrast to the conventional signature plot, this function gives zero energy at the mill feed. It is therefore hypothesized that if a squared function plot is obtained by test work for one feed particle size, the plot for another feed particle size can be obtained simply by changing the intercept of the line while keeping the slope the same. Therefore, the squared function plot allows the effect of changes in both F80 and P80 to be modeled.

While the Squared Function Plot is intriguing, experimental validation of its applicability has not yet been published. It nevertheless remains an interesting topic for further investigation and if validated may be used in the future as an alternative measure of specific energy.

A similar analysis has been performed by Musa and Morrison,[21] who developed a model to determine the surface area within each size fraction of mill product. They defined a marker size below which 70 to 80pct of the product surface area was contained; the marker size thus served as a proxy for surface area production. Specific energy use was then defined as kWh of power per the tonne of new material generated below the marker size. Musa and Morrison found that by defining specific energy in this way, it was possible to accurately predict the performance of full-scale Vertimills and Isamills from laboratory tests.

Blecher and coworkers[22,23] found that stress intensity combines the most important variables determining milling performance. Stress intensity for a horizontal stirred mill, with media much harder than the mineral to be ground, is defined as in Eq. [4].

Note that the stress intensity is strongly sensitive to changes in media diameter (to the third power), is less sensitive to stirrer tip speed (to the second power), and is relatively insensitive to media and slurry density.

For vertical stirred mills such as the SMD and tower mill, both SIs and SIg are non-zero. For horizontal stirred mills such as the Isamill, net gravitational SI is zero due to symmetry along the horizontal axis. Therefore, for horizontal stirred mills, only SIs need be taken into consideration.

Kwade and coworkers noted that, at a given specific energy input, the product P80 obtainable varies with stress intensity and passes through a minimum. Product size at a given energy input can be viewed as a measure of milling efficiency; therefore, milling efficiency reaches a maximum at a single given stress intensity. This idea was experimentally validated by Jankovic and Valery (Figure 4).[25]

The stress intensity is defined by parameters that are independent of mill size or type. According to Jankovic and Valery,[25] once the optimum SI has been determined in one mill for a given feed, the same SI should also be the point of optimum efficiency in any other mill treating that feed. Therefore, the optimum SI need only be determined in one mill (e.g., a small test mill); the operating parameters of a full-scale mill need only be adjusted to produce the optimum SI.

Stress frequency multiplied by stress intensity is equal to mill power; therefore, stress intensity could in theory be used to predict mill specific energy. However, to the authors knowledge, a comprehensive model linking stress intensity, stress frequency, and specific energy has not yet been developed. Therefore, there is not yet any direct link between stress intensity and specific energy.

The definition of SIs as given in Eq. [4] is valid only for cases where the grinding media are much harder than that of the material ground (for example, the grinding of limestone with glass beads). Becker and Schwedes[26] determined that, in a collision between media and a mineral particle, the fraction of energy transferred to the product is given by Eq. [6]:

To maintain high efficiency in milling, the media must be chosen so as to be much harder (higher Youngs modulus) than the product material, keeping E p,rel close to unity. Where the Youngs modulus of the product is similar to that of the media, much of the applied energy goes into deformation of the media instead of that of the particle to be ground. The energy used to deform the media is lost, lowering the amount of energy transferred to the product. This fact explains why steel media, with a relatively low Youngs modulus, tend to perform poorly in stirred milling, even though the media are much more dense than silica or alumina media.

The previous sections indicated that stress intensity is independent from individual millsi.e., the optimal stress intensity when using Mill A will also be the optimal stress intensity when using Mill B. However, this does not seem to be the case when actually scaling up mills.

Four-liter Isamills are commonly used for grindability test work. It can be assumed that operating parameters of the test mill (including media type, media size, and slurry density) are adjusted so far as possible to give the optimum SI. These parameters are then used in the full-scale mill as well. However, the 4-L test mills have a tip speed of approximately 8m/s, while full-scale Isamills have tip speeds close to 20m/s.[27] If the same media size, media density, and slurry density are used in the test mill as in the full-scale mill, the stress intensity of the full-scale mill will be approximately 6.25 times larger than that of the test mill. This implies that the full-scale mill is operating outside of the optimum SI and will be grinding less efficiently. That is to say that the operating point of the full-scale mill will be above the signature plot determined by test work.

In reality, however, the operating points of full-scale stirred mills are generally found to lie on the signature plots generated in test work.[19] Therefore, the full-scale mills and test mills have the same milling efficiency, even though the full-scale mill operates at a different stress intensity than the test mill.

This question remains unresolved. One possible answer arises from the observation that two of the P80 vs SI curves in Figure4 appear to have broad troughs, covering almost an order of magnitude change in SI. In this case, even a sixfold increase in SI might not create a noticeable difference in performance, considering experimental and measurement error.

Product size vs stress intensity at three different specific energies for a zinc regrind. Note optimum stress intensity at which the lowest product size is reached. Figure used with permission from Jankovic and Valery[25]

The SMD test unit appears from photographs to have a bed depth of around 30cm, while the full-scale SMD355 has a bed depth of approximately one meter. This represents a change in the gravitational stress intensity of almost two orders of magnitude. As has been previously noted, however, laboratory and full-scale SMDs scale-up with a scale-up factor of approximately unity, with no apparent change in the optimum stress intensity. This observation suggests that the gravitational stress intensity, SIg, is unimportant in SMDs compared to the stirring stress intensity, SIs. By contrast, in GIS mills, where full-size units have bed depths of ten meters or more, gravitational stress intensity can be expected to be much more important in full-size units than in test units, adding a complicating factor to GIS mill scale-up.

Factorial design experiments were performed by Gao et al.[28] and Tuzun and Loveday[29] to determine the effect of various operating parameters on the power use of laboratory mills. Power models were determined giving the impact of different parameters as power equations with linear and nonlinear terms. The derived models did not appear to be applicable to mills other than the particular laboratory units being studied.

In ball milling, the Bond ball mill work index can be used to determine specific energy at a range of feed and product sizes. The Bond top size ball formula can be used to estimate the media size required. No such standard formulas exist in fine grinding. Energy and media parameters must instead be determined in the laboratory for every new combination of operating conditions such as feed size, media size, and media type.

For the Isamill, test work is usually performed with a 4-L bench-scale Isamill. Approximately 15kg of the material to be ground is slurried to 20pct solid density by volume. The slurry is then fed through the mill and mill power is measured. The products PSD is measured, additional water is added if needed, and the material is sent through the mill again. This continues until the target P80 is reached; typically, there will be 5 to 10 passes through the mill. The test work will produce a signature plot and media consumption data as the deliverables.

In contrast to laboratory-scale testing for ball mills and AG/SAG mills, test work results for stirred mills can be used for sizing full-size equipment with a scale-up factor close to one. Larson et al.[19,20] found a scale-up factor for the Isamill of exactly 1, while Gao et al.[8] imply that the scale-up factor for SMDs is 1.25.

A common error in test work is using monosize media (e.g., fresh 2-mm media loaded into in the mill) as opposed to aged media with a distribution of particle sizes. The aged media will grind the smaller feed particles more efficiently. Therefore, using fresh media will give a higher specific energy than in reality.[30]

Another pitfall is coarse holdup in the mill. If the mill is not sufficiently flushed, coarse particles will be kept inside the mill. The mill product then appears finer than it in reality is. This leads to lower estimates of specific energy than reality.[19]

In ball milling, the product particle size distribution (PSD) can usually be modeled as being parallel to the feed PSD on a log-linear plot.[4] When grinding to finer sizes in ball mills, the parallel PSDs mean that large amounts of ultrafine particles are produced. This consumes a large amount of grinding energy while producing particles which are difficult to recover in subsequent processing steps such as flotation.

As shown in the figure, at the left end of the graph, the product PSD is very close to the feed PSD; at the right, the two PSDs are widely spaced. This indicates that the mill is efficiently using its energy to break the top size particles and is spending very little energy on further grinding of fine particles. Thus, the overall energy efficiency of the fine grinding can be expected to be good. As a bonus, the tighter PSD makes control of downstream processes such as flotation easier.

In an experimental study, Jankovic and Sinclair subjected calcite and silica to fine grinding in a laboratory pin stirred mill, a Sala agitated mill (SAM), and a pilot tower mill. The authors found that for each mill, the PSD of the product was narrower (steeper) than that of the feed. In addition, when grinding to P80s below approximately 20m in any of the three mills tested, the PSD became more narrow (as measured by P80/P20 ratio) as the P80 decreased. (When the width of the PSD was calculated using an alternative formula, the PSD was only observed to narrow with decreasing P80 when using the pin stirred mill.) The authors concluded that the width of the PSD was strongly affected by the material properties of the feed, while not being significantly affected by the media size used.[32]

In stirred milling, the most commonly used media are ceramic balls of 1 to 5mm diameter. The ceramic is usually composed of alumina, an alumina/zirconia blend, or zirconium silicate. Ceramic media exist over a wide range of quality and cost, with the lower quality/cost ceramic having a higher wear rate than higher quality/cost ceramic. Other operations have used sand as media, but at the time of writing, only two operations continue to use sand.[8,27,33] Mt Isa Mines has used lead smelter slag as media; however, it is now using sand media.[10,27] Mt Isa is an exception in its use of slag, as a vast majority of operations do not have a smelter on-site to provide a limitless supply of free grinding media. However, in locations where slag is available, it should be considered as another source of media.

Media use in fine grinding is considered to be proportional to the mechanical energy applied. Typical wear rates and costs are given in TableIII and Figure6; these figures can of course vary significantly from operation to operation.

Contained energy refers to the energy required to produce and transport the media, and is distinct from the mechanical (electrical) energy used to drive the mill. Hammond and Jones estimated the contained energy in household ceramics (not taking account of transportation).[39] Hammond and Jones estimates range from 2.5 to 29.1MJ/kg, with 10MJ/kg for general ceramics and 29MJ/kg for sanitary ceramics. Given that ceramic grinding media require very good hardness and strength, especially compared to household ceramics, it is appropriate to estimate its contained energy at the top end of Hammond and Jones range, at 29MJ/kg.

Using 29MJ/kg for the contained energy of ceramic media and a wear rate of 35g/kWh of mechanical energy gives a contained energy consumption of 0.28kWh contained per kWh of mechanical energy applied. A wear rate of 7g/kWh gives a contained energy consumption of 0.06kWh contained per kWh of mechanical energy applied. Therefore, 6 to 20pct of the energy use in fine grinding using ceramic media can be represented by contained energy in the grinding media itself.

Sand media have much lower contained energy than ceramic media as the media must simply be mined or quarried rather than manufactured. Hammond and Jones report a contained energy of 0.1MJ/kg. Blake et al.[36] reported that switching a stirred mills media from sand to ceramic results in a mechanical energy savings of 20pct. Therefore, using sand rather than ceramic media would produce savings in contained energy, but would cost more in mechanical energy. Likewise, Davey[40] suggests that poor-quality media will increase mechanical energy use in stirred milling. It is speculated that this is due to the lower sphericity of sand media. On the other hand, the work of Nesset et al.[7] suggests that the energy use between ceramic and sand media of the same size is the same. Slag media, where a smelter is on-site, would probably have the lowest contained energy consumption of the different media types. There is very little transportation, and for accounting purposes, almost no energy has gone into creating the media as the granulated slag is a by-product of smelter operation.

Becker and Schwedes[41] point out that with poor-quality media, a significant part of the product will consist of broken pieces of media, which will affect the measured product PSD. Clearly, more information on the relationships between contained energy in media and media wear rates is desirable.

Of the different operating parameters for stirred mills, media size probably has the biggest influence on overall energy consumption. The appropriate media size for a mill appears to be a function of the F80 and P80 required. The grinding media must be large enough to break up the largest particles fed to the mill and small enough to grind the material to the product fineness desired. As demonstrated by the experience of Century mine, an inappropriate media size choice can result in energy consumption double that of optimum operation.[8]

In their laboratory study, Nesset et al.[7] varied a number of operating parameters for stirred mills and identified media size as having the largest impact on energy use. It was also noted that the trials which produced the sharpest product PSD were also the ones which resulted in the lowest specific energy use.

Gao et al.[8] report that at Century mine, the grinding media in SMDs performing regrind duty were changed from 1 to 3mm. This resulted in a drop in energy use of approximately 50pct; the signature plot shifted significantly downward (Figure7).

Figure8 shows the product PSD for laboratory SMD tests using 1- and 3-mm media. The PSD for the test using 1-mm media shows that the SMD produced a significant amount of fines (20pct below 4m). The mill also had difficulty breaking the top size particlesthe 100pct passing size appears to be almost the same for both the feed and the product. In contrast, the PSD using 3-mm media shows less fines production (20pct below 9m) and effective top size breakage, with all the particles above 90m broken. This is in line with the observation of Nesset et al.[7] that low energy use is associated with tight product size distributions.

Gao et al.[38] tested copper reverberatory furnace slag (CRFS, SG 3.8) and heavy media plant rejects (HMPR, SG 2.4) in a laboratory stirred mill at two sizes: 0.8/+0.3mm, and 1.7/+0.4mm. For both CRFS and HMPR, the smaller size media gave a lower specific energy than the larger size media. At the same size, both CRFS and HMPR had similar specific energy use. However, the CRFS ground the material much faster than HMPR. Possibly, this was due to its higher density.

Data on F80, P80, and media size were compiled from the literature in order to allow benchmarking against existing operations. The sources are listed in Table IV. F80 and P80 were plotted against media size; the results are given in Figure9.

F80 plotted against media size (blue diamonds); P80 plotted against media size (red crosses). Century UFG=Century ultrafine grind; Century Regr.=Century regrind. Data are taken from Case studies table (Color figure online)

It can be seen from the figure that as the P80 achieved decreases, the media size does as well, from 3mm to achieve 45m to 1mm to achieve under 10m. The F80 decreases with media size in a similar way, from 90m at 3mm to 45m at 1mm. Dotted lines have been added to Figure7 to define the region of operation of mills; these delimit a zone in which the stirred mill can be expected to operate efficiently.

In general, for a particular media size, limits on both F80 and P80 must be respected. For example, the figure suggests that a mill operating with an F80 of 100m should use 3-mm media, while a mill grinding to below 10m would need to use 1-mm media. To reduce a feed of 90m F80 to 10m P80, Figure9 suggests that comminution be done in two stages (two Isamills or SMDs in series) for optimal efficiency. The first stage would grind the feed from 90m to perhaps 45m using 3-mm media, while the second would grind from 45 to 10m using 1- or 2-mm media.

A number of opportunities exist to reduce the energy footprint of fine grinding mills. There are no general formulas, such as the Bond work formula and Bond top size ball formula in ball milling, to describe the performance of stirred mills. Therefore, improvement opportunities must be quantified by performing appropriate test work.

In addition to obtaining the signature plot, the specific energy as a function of new surface area should be determined during test work. This could be done either by the method of Larsen or by that of Musa and Morrison. Defining specific energy as a function of new surface area may constitute a superior means of predicting the performance of full-scale mills, as opposed to defining specific energy as a function of feed tonnage.

Media size should be chosen with care. It is recommended that test work be done with several media sizes in order to locate the stress intensity optimum. Media size can be benchmarked against other operations using Figure9.

There are indications that lower-quality media, apart from degrading faster, require more mechanical energy for grinding due to factors such as lower sphericity. It is recommended to perform test work using media of different quality to determine the effect of media quality on energy use. Slag and sand media may also be considered. Subsequently, a trade-off study involving media cost, electricity cost, improvement in energy efficiency, and contained energy in media should be performed to identify the best media from an economic and energy footprint standpoint.

D. Rahal, D. Erasmus, and K. Major: KnelsonDeswick Milling Technology: Bridging the Gap Between Low and High Speed Stirred Mills, Paper presented at the 43rd Canadian Mineral Processors Meeting, Ottawa, 2011.

Metso: Stirred milling: Vertimill grinding mills and Stirred Media Detritor (product brochure), 2013, available at http://www.metso.com/miningandconstruction/MaTobox7.nsf/DocsByID/F58680427E2A748F852576C4005210AC/$File/Stirred_Mills_Brochure-2011_LR.pdf, accessed April 21, 2013.

J. Nesset, P. Radziszewski, C. Hardie, and D. Leroux: Assessing the Performance and Efficiency of Fine Grinding Technologies, Paper presented at the 38th Canadian Mineral Processors Meeting, Ottawa, 2006.

FLSmidth: Acquisition enhances our precious metals offerings, 2012, FLSmidth eHighlights April 2012, available at http://www.flsmidth.com/en-US/eHighlights/Archive/Minerals/2012/April/Acquisition+enhances+our+precious+metals+offerings, accessed 17 April 2013.

S. Buys, C. Rule, and D. Curry: The Application of Large Scale Stirred Milling to the Retreatment of Merensky Platinum Tailings, Paper presented at the 37th Canadian Mineral Processors Meeting, Ottawa, 2005.

D. Curry, M. Cooper, J. Rubenstein, T. Shouldice, and M. Young: The Right Tools in the Right Place: How Xstrata Nickel Australasia Increased Ni Throughput at Its Cosmos Plant, Paper presented at the 42nd Canadian Mineral Processors conference, Ottawa, 2010.

G. Davey: Fine Grinding Applications Using the Metso Vertimill Grinding Mill and the Metso Stirred Media Detritor (SMD) in Gold Processing, Paper presented at the 38th Canadian Mineral Processors Meeting, Ottawa, 2006.

minerals & metals processing, smelting & refining

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By: Theresa Bhowan5th October 2020 Foundry and engineering company Thos Begbie has received multiple orders to manufacture components for the pyrometallurgical industry. The company continues to manufacture copper components for this industry despite the constraints of limited resources in the engineering industry.

4th September 2020 Canadian-listed rare earth clean technologies developer Geomega Resources patent application US15/578,498 titled, A system and a method for metallurgical extraction of rare earth elements (REE) and niobium, was approved by the United States Patent and Trademark Office in June.

4th September 2020 Latin American zinc, copper and lead producer Nexa Resources has appointed Swiss automation company ABB to provide state-of-the-art industrial automation systems for new and existing operations.

4th September 2020 A PhD study on developing a roadmap for the South African titanium metal industry indicated that the South African titanium metal value chain should be expanded to include local TiCl4 and titanium metal powder production. The study was conducted at the Graduate School of Technology Management, at...

4th September 2020 Metals and rare earth processor Australian Strategic Materials (ASM) joint venture (JV) partner South Koreas Zirconium Technology Corporation (ZironTech) has produced high purity (99.83%) titanium metal powder through its new electrorefining process at the commercial pilot plant in South Korea.

By: Theresa Bhowan4th September 2020 Chemical reagents supplier and distributor Axis House has launched an extension to its phosphate range to include defoamer and decadmiation products in addition to the existing Rinkalore collector range for phosphate flotation.

6th September 2019 Brazil-based lithium miner Sigma Lithium Resources has acquired the necessary environmental licences for the construction (LP) and installation (LI) of its lithium commercial production plant from Minas Gerais environmental authority the Council of Environmental Policy (Copam) in Brazil. Copam...

6th September 2019 Wire screen media products manufacturer MAJOR Wire Industries has introduced a new crown curve calculation and updated crown curve adaptors for enhanced performance by the companys tensioned Flex-Mat high vibration wire screens and other screen media products on screen decks originally designed...

By: Cameron Mackay6th September 2019 The specialised demolition services of demolition contractor Jet Demolition are ideally suited to the distinctive challenges of any furnace demolition, particularly those in mining operations, owing to the specialised machines and equipment modified to work in such a confined space, says Jet...

6th September 2019 Mining processing equipment provider Outotec has launched the new Outotec FP-S filter press, which is ideal for standard filtration applications, particularly when there is a need for short delivery lead-time and a safe, reliable operation. The filter press offers efficient solid-liquid...

6th September 2019 Canadian gold production company Dynacor Gold Mines has signed a letter of intent (LoI) with mining equipment provider KN Equipments and wealth fund the Sovereign Wealth Fund of Senegal for Strategic Invesments (FONSIS) to begin the process of strategically expanding Dynacors business globally...

By: Halima Frost7th September 2018 Vereeniging-based furnace and industrial services provider Dickinson Group of Companies has been appointed as an agent for Danish chemical industry company Haldor Topsoe in Namibia, Zambia and the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). Dickinson Group will promote, sell and strategically warehouse...

7th September 2018 Mineral resources company Inca One Gold has entered into a definitive purchase agreement to acquire full ownership of Anthem United, which owns 90.14% interest in the 350 t/d Koricancha ore processing facility in Peru, from miner Equinox Gold. Koricancha is located about 50 km from Inca Ones ore...

7th September 2018 Mining equipment specialist Osborn Engineered Services has secured an R8.5-million order to supply a range of its high-quality machines to a new manganese mine in the Northern Cape. Osborn product sales manager Francois Scott says that this order and the region are significant for Osborn. The...

7th September 2018 South African mineral processing equipment manufacturer Multotec has taken the step of having its local content verified by the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS), in line with the requirements of the 2018 draft Broad-Based Socio-Economic Empowerment Charter for the Mining and Mineral...

By: Halima Frost7th September 2018 Construction of platinum producer Anglo American Platinums (Amplats)sulphur dioxide (SO2) abatement project at its Polokwane smelter, in Limpopo, has started. Amplats will implement new wet sulphuric acid (WSA) technology at the smelter, which the company predicts will ultimately reduce SO2...

By: Marleny Arnoldi15th December 2017 Platinum group metal (PGM) tailings reprocessing company Tailing Technology (Tailtech) is investigating the potential development of a tailings plant to add value to an existing operation owned by platinum miner Anglo American Platinum (Amplats).

By: Marleny Arnoldi15th December 2017 Aim-listed Goldplat PLCs recovery operation in South Africa, Goldplat Recovery, will be investing in a tailings retreatment project during 2018, as its growth over the past decade has resulted in the operation accumulating a large tailings stock dam.

15th December 2017 Historical diamond tailings left across Kimberley, in the Northern Cape, by diversified miner De Beers Consolidated Mines continue to hold significant potential for diamond extraction, owing to technological advances made in ore treatment.

By: Marleny Arnoldi15th December 2017 Activated carbon manufacturer Rotocarb offers tailings retreatment plants in the mining industry a solution for their water-intensive processing and wastewater treatment operations that uses local raw material, technology and deployment to produce activated carbon, which is critical in the...

15th December 2017 A distributor and service provider of piping and related products covering the entire fluid conveyance cycle, Rare Group was established in 1975 to supply carbon steel products to the petrochemicals industry. Rare has since evolved into a complete pipeline solutions provider which holds ISO...

By: Marleny Arnoldi8th September 2017 To address water contamination in the minerals processing sector, processing specialist Multotec is installing its CleanTeQ ion-exchange system, which is designed for the removal of soluble elements from process water, at operations in Oman and soon in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

8th September 2017 University of the Witwatersrand (Wits) School of Mining Engineering mineral resources and reserves joint commission international Professor Dick Minnit received the Pierre Maurice Gy Sampling Gold Medal at the eighth World Conference on Sampling and Blending 2017, in Perth, Australia.

8th September 2017 The need for optimal safety, high yield and combustion value to ensure process integrity is spurring double-digit growth and adoption of humidity and moisture sensors in various industries, including the mining and minerals processing industry, states market research company Frost & Sullivan.

By: Marleny Arnoldi8th September 2017 Infrastructure solutions company BT says minerals processing companies are starting to prioritise efforts against cyberattacks on process control solutions. BT Asia, Middle East and Africa head of energy and research Stephen du Preez, tells Mining Weekly that a targeted attack can cripple or even...

By: Marleny Arnoldi8th September 2017 Owing to tough ferrochrome and ferromanganese market conditions globally, process and engineering service provider Metix has had to widen its focus beyond ferrous metals and target the processing of other commodities.

By: Marleny Arnoldi8th September 2017 With technology and equipment used for mineral processing well established and generally highly automated, slurry control valves manufacturer eDART is focused on the efficient use of energy and the improved reliability of components.

8th September 2017 Coarse particle flotation (CPF) technology can increase mill throughput by as much as 15% to 20% while reducing energy and media consumption, and provides a coarse tailings stream, without a loss in mineral recovery, says Canada-headquartered global flotation technology provider Eriez Flotation.

By: Marleny Arnoldi8th September 2017 Automation technology for minerals processing has become an indispensable element of productivity, owing to the role it plays in improving quality, reducing cost and labour intensity, as well as decreasing energy and raw material consumption, says integrated solutions provider Takraf Africa,...

By: Marleny Arnoldi8th September 2017 Wear solutions provider Rio-Carb completed a liner supply project for diamond miner Petra Diamonds Cullinan mine, near Pretoria, in Gauteng, in June.

2nd September 2016 As a result of the sustained pressure on commodity prices and continuing geopolitical risks, investments in metal production have remained at a low level, says the German engineering federation Verband Deutscher Maschinen- und Anlagenbaus (VDMAs) supplier of plant, machinery, equipment and...

comparative lca of concrete with recycled aggregates: a circular economy mindset in europe | springerlink

Construction and demolition waste (C&DW) is the largest waste stream in the European Union (EU) and all over the world. Proper management of C&DW and recycled materialsincluding the correct handling of hazardous wastecan have major benefits in terms of sustainability and the quality of life. The Waste Framework Directive 2008/98/EC aims to have 70% of C&DW recycled by 2020. However, except for a few EU countries, only about 50% of C&DW is currently being recycled. In the present research, the environmental impact of concrete with recycled aggregates and with geopolymer mixtures is analysed. The aim of the present research is to propose a comparative LCA of concrete with recycled aggregates in the context of European politics.

Results show that the concrete with 25% recycled aggregates is the best solution from an environmental point of view. Furthermore, geopolymer mixtures could be a valid alternative to reduce the phenomenon of global warming; however, the production of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide has a great environmental impact.

A possible future implementation of the present study is certainly to carry out an overall assessment and to determine the most cost-effective option among the different competing alternatives through the life cycle cost analysis.

Blengini GA, Garbarino E, olar S, Shields DJ, Hmor T, Vinai R, Agioutantis Z (2012) Life cycle assessment guidelines for the sustainable production and recycling of aggregates: the sustainable aggregates resource management project (SARMa). J Clean Prod 27:177181

Blengini GA, Garbarino E, Bevilacqua P (2017) Sustainability and integration between mineral resources and C&DW management: overview of key issues towards a resource-efficient Europe. Env Eng Man J 16(2):493502

Chen C, Habert G, Bouzidi Y, Jullien A, Ventura A (2010) LCA allocation procedure used as an incitative method for waste recycling: an application to mineral additions in concrete. Res Con Rec 54(12):12311240

Chen Z, Gu H, Bergman RD, Liang S (2020) Comparative life-cycle assessment of a high-rise mass timber building with an equivalent reinforced concrete alternative using the Athena impact estimator for buildings. Sustainability (Switzerland) 12(11):4708

COM (2012) 433, COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL Strategy for the sustainable competitiveness of the construction sector and its enterprises, http://eur-lex.europa.eu/procedure/EN/201859, Brussels, 31.7.2012, COM(2012) 433 final

COM (2014) 445, COMMUNICATION FROM THE COMMISSION TO THE EUROPEAN PARLIAMENT AND THE COUNCIL, http://ec.europa.eu/environment/eussd/pdf/SustainableBuildingsCommunication.pdf, Brussels, 1.7.2014 COM(2014) 445 final

Gluth, G.J.G., Arbi, K., Bernal, S.A., Bondar, D., Castel, A., Chithiraputhiran, S., Dehghan, A., Dombrowski-Daube, K., Dubey, A., Ducman, V., Peterson, K., Pipilikaki, P., Valcke, S.L.A., Ye, G., Hajimohammadi, A., van Deventer, J.S.J., 2017. Characterisation of one-part geopolymer binders made from fly ash. Waste Biom Val, 8(1), pp. 225233

Petrillo A, Cioffi R, De Felice F, Colangelo F, Borrelli C (2016) An environmental evaluation: a comparison between geopolymer and OPC concrete paving blocks manufacturing process in Italy. Env Prog Sus Energy 35(6):16991708

Van den Heede P, De Belie N (2012) Environmental impact and life cycle assessment (LCA) of traditional and green concretes: literature review and theoretical calculations. Cem Conc Comp 34(4):431442

Zhang C, Hu M, Dong L, Gebremariam A, Mirand-Xicotencatl B, Di Maio F, Tukker A (2019) Eco-efficiency assessment of technological innovations in high-grade concrete recycling. Res Cons Recycling 149:649663

Colangelo, F., Navarro, T.G., Farina, I. et al. Comparative LCA of concrete with recycled aggregates: a circular economy mindset in Europe. Int J Life Cycle Assess 25, 17901804 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s11367-020-01798-6