example of a classifier used in asl

introducing classifiers in sign language

Classifier in sign language is a signed word that represents a particular group of objects or referents. A classifier handshape may be incorporated with a movement, palm orientation, and/or location to convey rich information in a predicate.

There is no ASL without classifiers. Classifier predicates in ASL are very common and heavily used. Learning and understanding classifiers can significantly improve your expressive language skills.

The ASL speaker first signs the noun and then the classifier predicate. She did first for the book. But for the rest of the objects, she didn't repeat the noun TABLE because she has established the reference and consistently refers to it. This gives you the idea how different classifiers are used for these objects.

The handshape looks like this image above but its palm orientation is horizontal, not upright. This classifier may represent a group of pieces such as an animal, chair, a toilet, a rocking chair, a sitting person, etc.

The signer begins with the ASL word table [left image] and then assigns it a pronominal classifier (palm faced down) for the table. Notice that the signer uses the passive hand for the classifier because she uses the dominant hand for the next noun (cat).

Or, "... lying down on the table". The signer has changed the palm orientation of the classifier to represent a lying-down cat. If she lowers her eyelids at the same time she signs "lying down", it means the "the cat is sleeping on the table."

Learn and use classifiers in sentences as much as you can. The more you understand and comfortably use them, the more you enjoy this language. It also can significantly improve your expressive skills. ASL is vibrant and rich with classifiers.

Sign language on this site is the authenticity of culturally Deaf people and codas who speak ASL and other signed languages as their first language. This site creator is an ASL instructor and native signer who expresses love and passion for our sign language and culture [...]

classifier: instrumental classifiers (icl)

The handshapes of instrumental classifier show how an object is being handled, held, or used. E.g. using a tool, holding a book, cutting with a knife, pushing a button, lifting a jar lid, pulling a nail, etc.

Sign language on this site is the authenticity of culturally Deaf people and codas who speak ASL and other signed languages as their first language. This site creator is an ASL instructor and native signer who expresses love and passion for our sign language and culture [...]

what is a descriptive classifier?

instrumental classifier (ICL) The handshapes of instrumental classifiers describe how an object is handled. E.g. using a tool, holding a book, cutting with a knife, pushing a button, lifting a jar lid, pulling a nail, etc.

Also, what is a classifier in/sign language? Classifier in sign language is a signed word that represents a particular group of objects or referents. A classifier handshape may be incorporated with a movement, palm orientation, and/or location to convey rich information in a predicate. There is no ASL without classifiers.

Locative classifier in sign language Classifier is a pronoun-like linguistic symbol that represents a class or group of referents. In ASL, a noun should be signed first before using its classifier to refer to it until a subject or noun is changed.

Semantic classifiers are proforms that function as "pronoun" that replaces a noun (or as noun and verb combined). Some examples of semantic classifiers are: cl-1 (e.g. a person), cl-2 (e.g. two persons), cl-2-upsidedown (a standing person), cl-2bent (e.g. an animal), etc. 2. descriptive classifier.

classifiers

At a coffee shop, you show the Deaf barista that you would like a little bit of milk with your coffee. She looks at you, and you describe with your one hand that you need a "little bit". How would you show it?

P-classifiers, are usually used in conjunction with other classifiers and don't function too well on their own. For all other classifiers, there is a lot of freedom and they can be used almost at any time during signing to clarify the message or to add humour, action or drama.By pointing to the classifier "G-HAND", establishes the classifier as the individual which name you just spelt. Now everytime you point into the direction of where the classifier was, everyone, will know who you are referring to.