examples of magnetic separation

what is magnetic separation? (with pictures)

Magnetic separation is an industrial process where ferromagnetic contaminants are recovered from materials on the production line. Manufacturers use this to extract useful metal, separate recycling, purify materials, and perform a wide variety of other tasks. Manufacturers of magnetic separation equipment may have a range of products available for sale for different applications, including an assortment of sizes with strong and weak magnetic fields to attract different kinds of magnetic material.

The magnetic separator consists of a large rotating drum that creates a magnetic field. Materials enter the separator and fall out through mesh at the base if they are not magnetic. Sensitive particles respond to the magnetism and cling to the sides of the container. The drums can be used in continuous processing of materials as they move along the assembly line, or in batch jobs, where a single batch is run through all at once.

One common use for magnetic separation is to remove unwanted metal from a shipment of goods. Magnetic separation can help companies keep materials pure, as well as remove things like nails and staples that may have crept into a shipment. The equipment can also purify ores, separate components for recycling, and perform a variety of other tasks where metals need to be separated or isolated. Equipment can range in size from a desktop unit for a lab that needs to process small amounts of material to huge drums used in scrap metal recycling centers.

Manufacturers of magnetic separation equipment typically provide specifications for their products for the benefit of prospective customers. Consumers may need equipment that targets a specific range of metals, or could require large size or high speed capacity. It may be possible to rent or lease equipment for some applications, or if a factory wants to try a device before committing to a purchase. Used equipment is also available.

A gentler form of magnetic separation can be used for delicate tasks like removing magnetic materials from cremated remains or finds at an archaeological site. In these situations, a technician carefully moves a magnet over the material to pull out materials like staples and jewelry. At a crematorium, this is necessary before ashes are ground, as metal objects can damage the equipment. For archaeologists, it can provide a mechanism for carefully separating materials at a find and documenting the position and location of various objects as the archaeologist uncovers them on site or in a lab.

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a InfoBloom researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a InfoBloom researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

@allenJo - I do believe they use these systems in water treatment systems. I dont know the mechanisms used but it is used from what Ive heard. Water should give up its magnetic particles quite easily, I would think, since the metals are just floating about like flotsam and jetsam in the ocean.

@Charred - Those are two very good points, and I am sure that they are accounted for. The uses described in the article suggest scenarios where the metals are rather loosely fitting, so I think the cleanup job would be thorough. What I wonder about is if this process can be adapted to water treatment? Since magnetic separation systems can be used to sift through fluids, could they purify water as well? That seems to be an obvious application. Where I live the tap water has a lot of metals and so we generally dont drink it. I already have three metal fillings; I dont need more metal in my body.

What I wonder about is if this process can be adapted to water treatment? Since magnetic separation systems can be used to sift through fluids, could they purify water as well? That seems to be an obvious application. Where I live the tap water has a lot of metals and so we generally dont drink it. I already have three metal fillings; I dont need more metal in my body.

What I wonder about is if this process can be adapted to water treatment? Since magnetic separation systems can be used to sift through fluids, could they purify water as well? That seems to be an obvious application. Where I live the tap water has a lot of metals and so we generally dont drink it. I already have three metal fillings; I dont need more metal in my body.

That seems to be an obvious application. Where I live the tap water has a lot of metals and so we generally dont drink it. I already have three metal fillings; I dont need more metal in my body.

I see two things here that are necessary for magnetic separation to work well. First, the metals must be easily dislodged from whatever material or goop they happen to be sitting in. Otherwise, theyll just remain stuck, and the separation will be less than effective in pulling out all the metals. Second, the magnetic drum separator itself must be sufficiently strong. I think thats obvious, and the second point is related to the first. If the separating device is not strong it wont dislodge the metals; but there may be situations where the device is strong, but the metals are just stuck and wont budge.

Second, the magnetic drum separator itself must be sufficiently strong. I think thats obvious, and the second point is related to the first. If the separating device is not strong it wont dislodge the metals; but there may be situations where the device is strong, but the metals are just stuck and wont budge.

Second, the magnetic drum separator itself must be sufficiently strong. I think thats obvious, and the second point is related to the first. If the separating device is not strong it wont dislodge the metals; but there may be situations where the device is strong, but the metals are just stuck and wont budge.

give some examples of magnetic separation. - chemistry q&a

Magnetic Separation is one of the most common and important physical separation techniques. Magnetic Separation is which separating components of mixtures by using magnets to attract magnetic materials or magnetically susceptible particles or bodies are separated from non-magnetic particles. Examples are:

magnetic separations: from steel plants to biotechnology - sciencedirect

Magnetic separations have for decades been essential processes in diverse industries ranging from steel production to coal desulfurization. In such settings magnetic fields are used in continuous flow processes as filters to remove magnetic impurities. High gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) has found even broader use in wastewater treatment and food processing. Batch scale magnetic separations are also relevant in industry, particularly biotechnology where fixed magnetic separators are used to purify complex mixtures for protein isolation, cell separation, drug delivery, and biocatalysis. In this review, we introduce the basic concepts behind magnetic separations and summarize a few examples of its large scale application. HGMS systems and batch systems for magnetic separations have been developed largely in parallel by different communities. However, in this work we compare and contrast each approach so that investigators can approach both key areas. Finally, we discuss how new advances in magnetic materials, particularly on the nanoscale, as well as magnetic filter design offer new opportunities for industries that have challenging separation problems.

magnetic separation | springerlink

Magnetic separation utilizes the force of a magnetic field to produce differential movement of mineral particles through a magnetic field; this and the fundamental differences in the magnetic susceptibility of minerals constitutes the basis of separation to effectively obtain purification or concentration of mineral products. In addition, magnetic separators are widely used as devices to protect processing equipment such as crushers, mixers, conveyors, and screens, by the removal of tramp iron that has inadvertently gotten into the feed material and could be damaging if not removed.