gold mining equipment places in port elizabeth

south africa construction mining equipment parts suppliers: port elizabeth cape town durban

Several companies in South Africa offer specialized engine and transmission systems parts for various construction and mining equipment makes and models apart from ones indicated above. View details below and on other pages.

Due to massive disruption of local business processes, and those of our partner networks in the region and around the world over the last few months, we have gone back to the drawing board and in the process of revising and updating heavy machinery parts dealers and suppliers in South Africa. These will be displayed here soonest possible.

We thank, most sincerely, all our customers and strategic heavy machinery parts industry partners in South Africa, the region and around the world, for your continued support in 2021 as we prepare, going forward, to continue serving you in the "new normal". It will certainly be an interesting learning curve.

In the meantime, send us your parts requirements here and we will link you to our partner network of heavy machinery parts suppliers, dealers and outlets in South Africa, and East Africa, who have partially or are preparing to fully re-open in the next few days.

For heavy machinery parts companies and businesses in South Africa, Contact Us Here ASAP to update customers around the world on your COVID-19 related operational status. We know you are working round the clock to solve current supply chain challenges and business process constrains.

|Parts Industry Partner Program 2021 |Affiliate Program |Contact Us / Enquire | TheSparePartShop.Com Copyright 2011 - 2021 All Rights Reserved World Wide Construction Equipment Parts Suppliers in South Africa Business Registration Number: 27U5XB8 | The Spare Part Shop Global Parts Service Company in South Africa

Please Note: Any information published on this website is not intended nor implied, in any way or manner whatsoever, to be a substitute for professional advice or endorsement of any product or company featured on this site. You should always consult with a suitably qualified professional for any additional advise or guidelines as may be required.

drill masters africa

Drillmasters Africa Limited is an international, multipurpose exploration drilling contractor. We are committed to providing professional, reliable and safe drilling services to mining and mineral exploration companies throughout West Africa.

We combine a highly experienced management team and workforce with state-of-the-art technology and equipment. We provide a consistently high quality service and have developed an enviable reputation for drilling in extremely difficult terrains.

bc placer - gold prospecting in bc

Prospecting is done in Placer Areas so that the prospector can get a claim. Exploration means pretty much the same thing as prospecting. Either one can mean exploring a large area or focusing on a smaller area or claim. Testing a Creek If a prospector is interested in a creek, the first step is usually testing for placer gold with a shovel and gold pan. See Where Gold is Found in a Creek or River, which is on the Gold Panning page. When working in a stream channel in BC, the prospector must follow the rules of Hand Panning. "Colors" (tiny flakes of gold) in the pan mean that there is (or was) more gold above and/or upstream. If a creek looks promising, it might be followed upstream (or the prospector might drive to a location upstream) to see if the creek gets richer, to see if there is a point beyond which the creek is not gold-bearing, and perhaps to see which tributaries (streams that join the original stream) are gold-bearing. Exploring Above and Away from the Creek Other than hand panning using only a shovel and pan, placer operations must be at least ten metres horizontally away from the water (although the Fraser River is a special case). So... Once a creek is discovered (or already known) to be gold bearing, the focus of prospecting is generally on where it flowed long ago. This means... benches - flat areas above the creek, either in the bottom of the valley or (possibly buried) benches up the side of the valley - even hundreds of feet above the creek, where it flowed half a million years ago ancient channels, which can mean the same thing as benches, but also: abandoned side-channels (that remain dry even when the creek/river is flooding) channels under the bottom of the valley that is partly filled with material washed down from upstream a higher old channel on the other side (the valley-wall side) of a hill or ridge in the valley Getting a Feel for the Past The first step in prospecting a gold-bearing stream is often walking around and looking around, getting a feel for how the stream has eroded the valley (making it deeper) and/or partially filled it with material from upstream. The effect of ice ages may be considered. Vast amounts of glacial melt-water is usually responsible for moving most of the material that partially fills a valley, giving it a flat bottom (not a U-shaped bottom). See A Little Geology - Valley Shape for more information. Exploring by Machine Digging Breaking the ground by powered machine is machine digging, which must be done on a claim and it requires a permit and reclamation bond. Drilling is often done prior to more expensive machine digging. This kind of drilling is like water-well drilling - material is recovered, but except at the bottom, you usually don't know the exact depth of any particular material. Digging test pits and trenches with a hoe/excavator to get samples is common. Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

Exploration means pretty much the same thing as prospecting. Either one can mean exploring a large area or focusing on a smaller area or claim. Testing a Creek If a prospector is interested in a creek, the first step is usually testing for placer gold with a shovel and gold pan. See Where Gold is Found in a Creek or River, which is on the Gold Panning page. When working in a stream channel in BC, the prospector must follow the rules of Hand Panning. "Colors" (tiny flakes of gold) in the pan mean that there is (or was) more gold above and/or upstream. If a creek looks promising, it might be followed upstream (or the prospector might drive to a location upstream) to see if the creek gets richer, to see if there is a point beyond which the creek is not gold-bearing, and perhaps to see which tributaries (streams that join the original stream) are gold-bearing. Exploring Above and Away from the Creek Other than hand panning using only a shovel and pan, placer operations must be at least ten metres horizontally away from the water (although the Fraser River is a special case). So... Once a creek is discovered (or already known) to be gold bearing, the focus of prospecting is generally on where it flowed long ago. This means... benches - flat areas above the creek, either in the bottom of the valley or (possibly buried) benches up the side of the valley - even hundreds of feet above the creek, where it flowed half a million years ago ancient channels, which can mean the same thing as benches, but also: abandoned side-channels (that remain dry even when the creek/river is flooding) channels under the bottom of the valley that is partly filled with material washed down from upstream a higher old channel on the other side (the valley-wall side) of a hill or ridge in the valley Getting a Feel for the Past The first step in prospecting a gold-bearing stream is often walking around and looking around, getting a feel for how the stream has eroded the valley (making it deeper) and/or partially filled it with material from upstream. The effect of ice ages may be considered. Vast amounts of glacial melt-water is usually responsible for moving most of the material that partially fills a valley, giving it a flat bottom (not a U-shaped bottom). See A Little Geology - Valley Shape for more information. Exploring by Machine Digging Breaking the ground by powered machine is machine digging, which must be done on a claim and it requires a permit and reclamation bond. Drilling is often done prior to more expensive machine digging. This kind of drilling is like water-well drilling - material is recovered, but except at the bottom, you usually don't know the exact depth of any particular material. Digging test pits and trenches with a hoe/excavator to get samples is common. Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

See Where Gold is Found in a Creek or River, which is on the Gold Panning page. When working in a stream channel in BC, the prospector must follow the rules of Hand Panning. "Colors" (tiny flakes of gold) in the pan mean that there is (or was) more gold above and/or upstream. If a creek looks promising, it might be followed upstream (or the prospector might drive to a location upstream) to see if the creek gets richer, to see if there is a point beyond which the creek is not gold-bearing, and perhaps to see which tributaries (streams that join the original stream) are gold-bearing. Exploring Above and Away from the Creek Other than hand panning using only a shovel and pan, placer operations must be at least ten metres horizontally away from the water (although the Fraser River is a special case). So... Once a creek is discovered (or already known) to be gold bearing, the focus of prospecting is generally on where it flowed long ago. This means... benches - flat areas above the creek, either in the bottom of the valley or (possibly buried) benches up the side of the valley - even hundreds of feet above the creek, where it flowed half a million years ago ancient channels, which can mean the same thing as benches, but also: abandoned side-channels (that remain dry even when the creek/river is flooding) channels under the bottom of the valley that is partly filled with material washed down from upstream a higher old channel on the other side (the valley-wall side) of a hill or ridge in the valley Getting a Feel for the Past The first step in prospecting a gold-bearing stream is often walking around and looking around, getting a feel for how the stream has eroded the valley (making it deeper) and/or partially filled it with material from upstream. The effect of ice ages may be considered. Vast amounts of glacial melt-water is usually responsible for moving most of the material that partially fills a valley, giving it a flat bottom (not a U-shaped bottom). See A Little Geology - Valley Shape for more information. Exploring by Machine Digging Breaking the ground by powered machine is machine digging, which must be done on a claim and it requires a permit and reclamation bond. Drilling is often done prior to more expensive machine digging. This kind of drilling is like water-well drilling - material is recovered, but except at the bottom, you usually don't know the exact depth of any particular material. Digging test pits and trenches with a hoe/excavator to get samples is common. Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

When working in a stream channel in BC, the prospector must follow the rules of Hand Panning. "Colors" (tiny flakes of gold) in the pan mean that there is (or was) more gold above and/or upstream. If a creek looks promising, it might be followed upstream (or the prospector might drive to a location upstream) to see if the creek gets richer, to see if there is a point beyond which the creek is not gold-bearing, and perhaps to see which tributaries (streams that join the original stream) are gold-bearing. Exploring Above and Away from the Creek Other than hand panning using only a shovel and pan, placer operations must be at least ten metres horizontally away from the water (although the Fraser River is a special case). So... Once a creek is discovered (or already known) to be gold bearing, the focus of prospecting is generally on where it flowed long ago. This means... benches - flat areas above the creek, either in the bottom of the valley or (possibly buried) benches up the side of the valley - even hundreds of feet above the creek, where it flowed half a million years ago ancient channels, which can mean the same thing as benches, but also: abandoned side-channels (that remain dry even when the creek/river is flooding) channels under the bottom of the valley that is partly filled with material washed down from upstream a higher old channel on the other side (the valley-wall side) of a hill or ridge in the valley Getting a Feel for the Past The first step in prospecting a gold-bearing stream is often walking around and looking around, getting a feel for how the stream has eroded the valley (making it deeper) and/or partially filled it with material from upstream. The effect of ice ages may be considered. Vast amounts of glacial melt-water is usually responsible for moving most of the material that partially fills a valley, giving it a flat bottom (not a U-shaped bottom). See A Little Geology - Valley Shape for more information. Exploring by Machine Digging Breaking the ground by powered machine is machine digging, which must be done on a claim and it requires a permit and reclamation bond. Drilling is often done prior to more expensive machine digging. This kind of drilling is like water-well drilling - material is recovered, but except at the bottom, you usually don't know the exact depth of any particular material. Digging test pits and trenches with a hoe/excavator to get samples is common. Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

"Colors" (tiny flakes of gold) in the pan mean that there is (or was) more gold above and/or upstream. If a creek looks promising, it might be followed upstream (or the prospector might drive to a location upstream) to see if the creek gets richer, to see if there is a point beyond which the creek is not gold-bearing, and perhaps to see which tributaries (streams that join the original stream) are gold-bearing. Exploring Above and Away from the Creek Other than hand panning using only a shovel and pan, placer operations must be at least ten metres horizontally away from the water (although the Fraser River is a special case). So... Once a creek is discovered (or already known) to be gold bearing, the focus of prospecting is generally on where it flowed long ago. This means... benches - flat areas above the creek, either in the bottom of the valley or (possibly buried) benches up the side of the valley - even hundreds of feet above the creek, where it flowed half a million years ago ancient channels, which can mean the same thing as benches, but also: abandoned side-channels (that remain dry even when the creek/river is flooding) channels under the bottom of the valley that is partly filled with material washed down from upstream a higher old channel on the other side (the valley-wall side) of a hill or ridge in the valley Getting a Feel for the Past The first step in prospecting a gold-bearing stream is often walking around and looking around, getting a feel for how the stream has eroded the valley (making it deeper) and/or partially filled it with material from upstream. The effect of ice ages may be considered. Vast amounts of glacial melt-water is usually responsible for moving most of the material that partially fills a valley, giving it a flat bottom (not a U-shaped bottom). See A Little Geology - Valley Shape for more information. Exploring by Machine Digging Breaking the ground by powered machine is machine digging, which must be done on a claim and it requires a permit and reclamation bond. Drilling is often done prior to more expensive machine digging. This kind of drilling is like water-well drilling - material is recovered, but except at the bottom, you usually don't know the exact depth of any particular material. Digging test pits and trenches with a hoe/excavator to get samples is common. Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

If a creek looks promising, it might be followed upstream (or the prospector might drive to a location upstream) to see if the creek gets richer, to see if there is a point beyond which the creek is not gold-bearing, and perhaps to see which tributaries (streams that join the original stream) are gold-bearing. Exploring Above and Away from the Creek Other than hand panning using only a shovel and pan, placer operations must be at least ten metres horizontally away from the water (although the Fraser River is a special case). So... Once a creek is discovered (or already known) to be gold bearing, the focus of prospecting is generally on where it flowed long ago. This means... benches - flat areas above the creek, either in the bottom of the valley or (possibly buried) benches up the side of the valley - even hundreds of feet above the creek, where it flowed half a million years ago ancient channels, which can mean the same thing as benches, but also: abandoned side-channels (that remain dry even when the creek/river is flooding) channels under the bottom of the valley that is partly filled with material washed down from upstream a higher old channel on the other side (the valley-wall side) of a hill or ridge in the valley Getting a Feel for the Past The first step in prospecting a gold-bearing stream is often walking around and looking around, getting a feel for how the stream has eroded the valley (making it deeper) and/or partially filled it with material from upstream. The effect of ice ages may be considered. Vast amounts of glacial melt-water is usually responsible for moving most of the material that partially fills a valley, giving it a flat bottom (not a U-shaped bottom). See A Little Geology - Valley Shape for more information. Exploring by Machine Digging Breaking the ground by powered machine is machine digging, which must be done on a claim and it requires a permit and reclamation bond. Drilling is often done prior to more expensive machine digging. This kind of drilling is like water-well drilling - material is recovered, but except at the bottom, you usually don't know the exact depth of any particular material. Digging test pits and trenches with a hoe/excavator to get samples is common. Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

Once a creek is discovered (or already known) to be gold bearing, the focus of prospecting is generally on where it flowed long ago. This means... benches - flat areas above the creek, either in the bottom of the valley or (possibly buried) benches up the side of the valley - even hundreds of feet above the creek, where it flowed half a million years ago ancient channels, which can mean the same thing as benches, but also: abandoned side-channels (that remain dry even when the creek/river is flooding) channels under the bottom of the valley that is partly filled with material washed down from upstream a higher old channel on the other side (the valley-wall side) of a hill or ridge in the valley Getting a Feel for the Past The first step in prospecting a gold-bearing stream is often walking around and looking around, getting a feel for how the stream has eroded the valley (making it deeper) and/or partially filled it with material from upstream. The effect of ice ages may be considered. Vast amounts of glacial melt-water is usually responsible for moving most of the material that partially fills a valley, giving it a flat bottom (not a U-shaped bottom). See A Little Geology - Valley Shape for more information. Exploring by Machine Digging Breaking the ground by powered machine is machine digging, which must be done on a claim and it requires a permit and reclamation bond. Drilling is often done prior to more expensive machine digging. This kind of drilling is like water-well drilling - material is recovered, but except at the bottom, you usually don't know the exact depth of any particular material. Digging test pits and trenches with a hoe/excavator to get samples is common. Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

The effect of ice ages may be considered. Vast amounts of glacial melt-water is usually responsible for moving most of the material that partially fills a valley, giving it a flat bottom (not a U-shaped bottom). See A Little Geology - Valley Shape for more information. Exploring by Machine Digging Breaking the ground by powered machine is machine digging, which must be done on a claim and it requires a permit and reclamation bond. Drilling is often done prior to more expensive machine digging. This kind of drilling is like water-well drilling - material is recovered, but except at the bottom, you usually don't know the exact depth of any particular material. Digging test pits and trenches with a hoe/excavator to get samples is common. Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

Drilling is often done prior to more expensive machine digging. This kind of drilling is like water-well drilling - material is recovered, but except at the bottom, you usually don't know the exact depth of any particular material. Digging test pits and trenches with a hoe/excavator to get samples is common. Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

Digging test pits and trenches with a hoe/excavator to get samples is common. Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

Samples can be tested by: panning small samples (maybe taken from larger samples) running larger samples through a sluice box processing larger "bulk" samples with a more sophisticated wash-plant - see the Mining Equipment page for more information. Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

Notices Copyright 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019, 2020, 2021 by Brian Marshall [email protected] All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

All images on this website are copyrighted by their owners and they may not be downloaded for other than personal use - republication, retransmission, reproduction or other use is prohibited. The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

The 3rd image is from FREEBigPictures.com INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map

INFORMATION PROVIDED BY THIS WEBSITE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF ACCURACY, MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NON-INFRINGEMENT. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Site Map