high frequency screen capture

how to evaluate oscilloscopes for your application | tektronix

Once you understand what an oscilloscope isand have determined the type of oscilloscope you need, there are still many models to choose from, including portable and hand-held. And when choosing an oscilloscope, there are a number of things to consider, such as the ease-of use, sample rate the probes used to bring data into it, and all the elements of an oscilloscope that affect its ability to achieve the required signal integrity. To understand these considerations, we'll look briefly at ease-of-use and oscilloscope probes, and then describe some useful measurement and oscilloscope performance terms. These terms cover the criteria essential to choosing the right oscilloscope for your application.

Oscilloscopes should be easy to learn and easy to use, helping you work at peak efficiency and productivity. This means you can focus on your design, rather than the measurement tools. Just as there is no one typical car driver, there is no one typical oscilloscope user. Regardless of whether you prefer a traditional instrument interface or a Windows software interface, it is important to have flexibility in your oscilloscope's operation. Many oscilloscopes offer a balance between performance and simplicity by providing many ways to operate the instrument. A typical oscilloscope's front-panel layout (Figure 60) provides dedicated vertical, horizontal and trigger controls.

Even the most advanced instrument can only be as precise as the data that goes into it. A probe works in conjunction with an oscilloscope as part of the measurement system. Precision measurements start at the probe tip. The right probes matched to the oscilloscope and the device under test (DUT) not only allow the signal to be brought to the oscilloscope cleanly, they also amplify and preserve the signal for the greatest signal integrity and measurement accuracy. Please refer to the Tektronix ABCs of Probes Primer for more information about probes and probe accessories.

Bandwidth determines an oscilloscope's fundamental ability to measure a signal. As signal frequency increases, the capability of an oscilloscope to accurately display the signal decreases. The bandwidth specification indicates the frequency range that the oscilloscope can accurately measure.

Oscilloscope bandwidth is specified as the frequency at which a sinusoidal input signal is attenuated to 70.7% of the signal's true amplitude, known as the 3 dB point, a term based on a logarithmic scale, as shown in Figure 44.

Without adequate bandwidth, an oscilloscope cannot resolve high-frequency changes. Amplitude is distorted. Edges vanish. Details are lost. All the features, bells and whistles in your oscilloscope will mean nothing.

An oscilloscope selected using the 5 Times Rule provides less than 2% error in your measurements. This is typically sufficient for today's applications. However, as signal speeds increase, it may not be possible to achieve this rule of thumb. Keep in mind that higher bandwidth will likely provide more accurate reproduction of a signal, as shown in Figure 45.

Some oscilloscopes provide a method of enhancing the bandwidth through digital signal processing (DSP). A DSP arbitrary equalization filter can be used to improve the oscilloscope channel response. This filter extends the bandwidth, flattens the oscilloscope's channel frequency response, improves phase linearity, and provides a better match between channels. It also decreases rise time and improves the time domain step response.

Rise time describes the useful frequency range of an oscilloscope. Rise time measurements are critical in the digital world. Rise time may be a more appropriate performance consideration when you expect to measure digital signals, such as pulses and steps. An oscilloscope must have sufficient rise time to accurately capture the details of rapid transitions (Figure 46).

Using this equation is similar to using the equation for bandwidth. As in the case of bandwidth, achieving this rule of thumb may not always be possible given the extreme speeds of today's signals. Always remember that an oscilloscope with faster rise time will more accurately capture the critical details of fast transitions.

Where K is a value between 0.35 and 0.45, depending on the shape of the oscilloscope's frequency response curve and pulse rise time response. Oscilloscopes with a bandwidth of <1 GHz typically have a 0.35 value, while oscilloscopes with a bandwidth of> 1 GHz usually have a value between 0.40 and 0.45.

Sample rate is specified in samples per second (S/s). It defines how frequently a digital oscilloscope takes a snapshot or sample of the signal, analogous to the frames in a movie. The faster an oscilloscope samples (i.e., the higher the sample rate), the greater the resolution and detail of the displayed waveform and the less likely that critical information or events is lost (Figure 48).

The minimum sample rate may also be important if you need to look at slowly changing signals over longer periods of time. Typically, the displayed sample rate changes with changes made to the horizontal scale control to maintain a constant number of waveform points in the displayed waveform record.

In order to accurately reconstruct a signal and avoid aliasing, the Nyquist theorem states that the signal must be sampled at least twice as fast as its highest frequency component. This theorem, however, assumes an infinite record length and a continuous signal. Since no oscilloscope offers infinite record length and, by definition, glitches are not continuous, sampling at only twice the rate of highest frequency component is usually insufficient.

In reality, accurate reconstruction of a signal depends on both the sample rate and the interpolation method used to fill in the spaces between the samples. Some oscilloscopes let you select either sin (x)/x interpolation for measuring sinusoidal signals, or linear interpolation for square waves, pulses and other signal types.

For accurate reconstruction using sin (x)/x interpolation, your oscilloscope should have a sample rate at least 2.5 times the highest frequency component of your signal. Using linear interpolation, the sample rate should be at least 10 times the highest frequency signal component.

The digital approach means that the oscilloscope can display any frequency within its range with stability, brightness, and clarity. For repetitive signals, the bandwidth of the digital oscilloscope is a function of the analog bandwidth of the front-end components of the oscilloscope, commonly referred to as the 3 dB point. For single-shot and transient events, such as pulses and steps, the bandwidth can be limited by the oscilloscope's sample rate.

All oscilloscopes blink. That is, they open their eyes a given number of times per second to capture the signal, and close their eyes in between. This is the waveform capture rate, expressed as waveforms per second (wfms/s). While the sample rate indicates how frequently the oscilloscope samples the input signal within one waveform, or cycle, the waveform capture rate refers to how quickly an oscilloscope acquires waveforms.

Waveform capture rates vary greatly, depending on the type and performance level of the oscilloscope. Oscilloscopes with high waveform capture rates provide significantly more visual insight into signal behavior, and dramatically increase the probability that the oscilloscope will quickly capture transient anomalies such as jitter, runt pulses, glitches and transition errors.

Digital storage oscilloscopes (DSO) employ a serial processing architecture to capture from 10 to 5,000 wfms/s. Some DSOs provide a special mode that bursts multiple captures into long memory, temporarily delivering higher waveform capture rates followed by long processing dead times that reduce the probability of capturing rare, intermittent events.

Most digital phosphor oscilloscopes (DPO) employ a parallel processing architecture to deliver vastly greater waveform capture rates. Some DPOs can acquire millions of waveforms in just seconds, significantly increasing the probability of capturing intermittent and elusive events and allowing you to see the problems in your signal more quickly (Figure 49).

Moreover, the DPO's ability to acquire and display three dimensions of signal behavior in real timeamplitude, time and distribution of amplitude over timeresults in a superior level of insight into signal behavior (Figure 50).

Record length, expressed as the number of points that comprise a complete waveform record, determines the amount of data that can be captured with each channel. Since an oscilloscope can store only a limited number of samples, the waveform duration (time) is inversely proportional to the oscilloscope's sample rate:

Oscilloscopes allow you to select record length to optimize the level of detail needed for your application. If you are analyzing an extremely stable sinusoidal signal, you may need only a 500 point record length, but if you are isolating the causes of timing anomalies in a complex digital data stream, you may need a million points or more for a given record length, as shown in Figure 51.

An oscilloscope's trigger function synchronizes the horizontal sweep at the correct point of the signal. This is essential for clear signal characterization. Trigger controls allow you to stabilize repetitive waveforms and capture single-shot waveforms.

Effective bits represent a measure of a digital oscilloscope's ability to accurately reconstruct a sine wave signal's shape. This measurement compares the oscilloscope's actual error to that of a theoretical ideal digitizer. Because the actual errors include noise and distortion, the frequency and amplitude of the signal must be specified.

Bandwidth alone is not enough to ensure that an oscilloscope can accurately capture a high frequency signal. The goal of oscilloscope design is a specific type of frequency response: maximally flat envelope delay (MFED). A frequency response of this type delivers excellent pulse fidelity with minimum overshoot and ringing. Since a digital oscilloscope is composed of real amplifiers, attenuators, ADCs, interconnects, and relays, MFED response is a goal that can only be approached. Pulse fidelity varies considerably with model and manufacturer.

Vertical sensitivity indicates how much the vertical amplifier can amplify a weak signal. This is usually measured in millivolts (mV) per division. The smallest voltage detected by a general-purpose oscilloscope is typically about 1 mV per vertical screen division.

Sweep speed indicates how fast the trace can sweep across the oscilloscope screen, making it possible to see fine details. The sweep speed of an oscilloscope is represented by time (seconds) per division.

Vertical resolution of the analog-to-digital converter (ADC), and therefore, the digital oscilloscope, indicates how precisely it can convert input voltages into digital values. Vertical resolution is measured in bits. Calculation techniques can improve the effective resolution, as exemplified with hi-res acquisition mode.

An important MSO acquisition specification is the timing resolution used for capturing digital signals. Acquiring a signal with better timing resolution provides a more accurate timing measurement of when the signal changes. For example, a 500 MS/s acquisition rate has 2 ns timing resolution and the acquired signal edge uncertainty is 2 ns. A smaller timing resolution of 60.6 ps (16.5 GS/s) decreases the signal edge uncertainty to 60.6 ps and captures faster changing signals.

Some MSOs internally acquire digital signals with two types of acquisitions at the same time. The first acquisition is with standard timing resolution, and the second acquisition uses a high-speed resolution. The standard resolution is used over a longer record length while the high-speed timing acquisition offers more resolution around a narrow point of interest (Figure 52).

The need to analyze measurement results remains of utmost importance. The need to document and share information and measurement results easily and frequently has also grown in importance. The connectivity of an oscilloscope delivers advanced analysis capabilities and simplifies the documentation and sharing of results. As shown in Figure 53, standard interfaces (GPIB, RS-232, USB, and Ethernet) and network communication modules enable some oscilloscopes to deliver a vast array of functionality and control.

Application modules and software may enable you to transform your oscilloscope into a highly-specialized analysis tool capable of performing functions such as jitter and timing analysis, microprocessor memory system verification, communications standards testing, disk drive measurements, video measurements, power measurements and much more. Figures 54 through 59 highlight a few of these examples.

To get a better understanding of how oscilloscopes work, continue on toCHAPTER 04: Oscilloscope Systems and Controls.Or explore the full line of Tektronix instruments to find the right oscilloscopefor your application.

We are the measurement insight company committed to performance, and compelled by possibilities. Tektronix designs and manufactures test and measurement solutions to break through the walls of complexity, and accelerate global innovation.

opencv - capture video data from screen in python - stack overflow

Is there a way with Python (maybe with OpenCV or PIL) to continuously grab frames of all or a portion of the screen, at least at 15 fps or more? I've seen it done in other languages, so in theory it should be possible.

I do not need to save the image data to a file. I actually just want it to output an array containing the raw RGB data (like in a numpy array or something) since I'm going to just take it and send it to a large LED display (probably after re-sizing it).

You will need to use ImageGrab from Pillow (PIL) Library and convert the capture to numpy array. When you have the array you can do what you please with it using opencv. I converted capture to gray color and used imshow() as a demonstration.

I tried all of the above but it did not give me the real-time screen update. You can try this. This code is tested and worked successfully and also give you a good fps output. You can also judge this by each loop time it's needed.

If anyone looking for a much easier and faster way to grab screen with mss library, then try ScreenGear class from my high-performance video-processing vidgear library. Just write these few lines of python code on any machine (Tested on all platforms, including Windows 10, MacOS Serra, Linux Mint) and enjoy threaded screen-casting.

This task is very simple with opencv, we are just capturing screenshots in loop, and converting it into frames. I created timer for screenrecording, in start you have to enter how many seconds you want to record:) Here is the code.

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get az screen recorder, gif recorder editor, video recorder - microsoft store en-in

Easy way to create GIF from screen recording, multi images. This is a GIF recorder as well as editor. Webcam recording and canvas recording support. Tutorial: https://thekingloft.com/az-screen-recorder-gif-recorder-editor-video-recorder-tutorial/ AZ Screen Recorder is a stable, high-quality screen recorder for Windows that helps you record smooth & clear screen videos and save them as GIF or in video format. With a ton of features like screen capture, screen video recorder, video editor this screen recording app provides an easy way to record screen videos such as video tutorials, video calls, game videos, live shows, and videos that can not be downloaded. Features: Import frames from video. Full editing of frames by frames recorded in GIF. Remove duplicate frames. Reduce frame count as well. Resize, crop, write free text, free drawing, watermark, cinemagraph, border, shadow and more. Fade and Slide transitions available. Capture frequency per second, per minute and per hour. Edit your GIF before save. Screen recording, you can save into GIF or video format. Manage all images in GIF. Crop images: Remove unwanted parts. Add text, and draw on image. Download and use this best Screen Recording GIF maker application. * Disclaimer: This app is not associated with any social media platforms. Contact us: Web: https://thekingloft.com/ Email: [email protected] Tutorial: https://thekingloft.com/az-screen-recorder-gif-recorder-editor-video-recorder-tutorial/

Easy way to create GIF from screen recording, multi images. This is a GIF recorder as well as editor. Webcam recording and canvas recording support. Tutorial: https://thekingloft.com/az-screen-recorder-gif-recorder-editor-video-recorder-tutorial/ AZ Screen Recorder is a stable, high-quality screen recorder for Windows that helps you record smooth & clear screen videos and save them as GIF or in video format. With a ton of features like screen capture, screen video recorder, video editor this screen recording app provides an easy way to record screen videos such as video tutorials, video calls, game videos, live shows, and videos that can not be downloaded. Features: Import frames from video. Full editing of frames by frames recorded in GIF. Remove duplicate frames. Reduce frame count as well. Resize, crop, write free text, free drawing, watermark, cinemagraph, border, shadow and more. Fade and Slide transitions available. Capture frequency per second, per minute and per hour. Edit your GIF before save. Screen recording, you can save into GIF or video format. Manage all images in GIF. Crop images: Remove unwanted parts. Add text, and draw on image. Download and use this best Screen Recording GIF maker application. * Disclaimer: This app is not associated with any social media platforms. Contact us: Web: https://thekingloft.com/ Email: [email protected] Tutorial: https://thekingloft.com/az-screen-recorder-gif-recorder-editor-video-recorder-tutorial/

Help Page: https://thekingloft.com/az-screen-recorder-gif-recorder-editor-video-recorder-tutorial/ This update contains some bug fixes and enhancements in UI. Want to let us know what you think? Go on, we want to hear from you! [email protected]

arduino high speed oscilloscope with pc interface : 8 steps - instructables

Transfered to a PC, these points can be accurately plotted against time.This Instructable will show you how the analogue input can be repeatedly added to a 1000 byte buffer and then transferred to a serial monitor. The data is collected using a high frequency interrupt, whose period can be accurately determined. The frequency can be altered to produce a range of possible periods.

I have written two slightly different versions for the Arduino data capture. One utilizes software triggering for when an accurate change in voltage is required, before the oscilloscope triggers. The second, uses hardware edge triggering based on an interrupt on Arduino pin 2. The hardware version runs a little faster at the highest frequency.

I did a minor rewrite today (31/8/2014). The PC interface now includes the option to set the voltage reference to accurately reflect the real value of the Arduino "5V" line. There are also small adjustments to the Arduino software.

As of 6/9/2014 I have developed a slightly modified version of the Software Triggered version which runs at up to 227.3 KHz on my Mega, using register commands to directly control single conversion reads. If there is interest, let me know.

In a fast run the arduino will wait for a serial response of any character for 1500 milli seconds after outputting data. If a character is received (a handshake), the Arduino will immediately gather more data. If 1500 mS is up more data is recorded, regardless.

Set the number of bits used in the analogue port capture. For speed 8 bits are read. The ADLAR bit controls the presentation of the ADC conversion Write one to ADLAR to left adjust. Otherwise, the value is right adjusted. This has an Immediate effect on the ADC Data Register.

Essentially if no triggering is selected, the adc interrupt is enabled and data is captured immediately. If triggering is selected an interrupt on digital port 2 is used to enable the interrupt on the adc port 1.

The flag triggered controls whether the digital port 2 interrupt starts the analogue port 1 interrupt . When triggered is false the interrupt starts the adc interrupt when it detects an edge in the analogue input.

2) For windows 7/8 copy the address of the folder in which you extracted the application. If you right click on the address in the bar at the top of windows file explorer you will find the option to copy the folder address.

Select frequency and you will get the square wave frequency. The first estimate is based on the rising edges at the midpoint of the voltage range. The second is based on a technique outlined in an excellent article at:

This bipolar converter is interesting. In the past I have designed these with an op amp, precision voltage reference and lots of trim pots. This design was inspired by an article which was supported by Ronald Michallick of Linear Applications. He suggested using a three resistor bridge and supplied an excel spreadsheet to design it.

My 20Mhz version was developed from work done by Bob Davis , who realised that the Arduino was never going to be able to directly measure significantly high data rates. His elegant solution was to use an external ADC and a fifo to capture the data at a high clock frequency. Once captured, the fifo flags the data capture completion and the Arduino transfers the data at it's clock frequency.

The 20 MHZ oscilloscope uses the tlc5510a and a 2K fifo (IDT7203L12TPG). By using a 2K fifo I am able to trigger by downloading all the data to the mega and then processing the trigger point in memory. Once found, I upload the subsequent 1000 values to the PC. Triggering is therefore rock solid. I have edge and level triggering on either voltage slope. A simple potentiometer is used to set the trig point.

3) Buffered, with the input dropped across 4 matched 22K resistors. This produces equal attenuations. The drop is passed through the excellent NE5534P 10MHz low noise op amp, configured as a follower... and then to a 4V3 zenner. This produces input ranges of 0 to 4, 5.33, 8 and 16V.

Hello DavidI have tried the program on mega I have boosted your image signal at 30KHZ.The signal is somewhat distorted. The extra frequency at 30KHZ is more distorted.If you can write me a program in which sampling shows me high frequencyProgram without programming a LED screen or connecting with a PC means a program that deals with ADC fast onlyThank you DavidI'm sorry to take your time.

// Defines for setting register bits#ifndef mysbi#define mysbi(sfr, bit) (_SFR_BYTE(sfr) |= _BV(bit))#endif#ifndef mycbi#define mycbi(sfr, bit) (_SFR_BYTE(sfr) &= ~_BV(bit))#endifconst byte testpin = 10;// connect pin10 to analogue 0 for testing// defines for pwm output on testpin (pin 10 specific on mega!)#ifndef fastpwm#define fastpwm (TCCR2B = (TCCR2B & B11111000) | B00000010)#endif#ifndef slowpwm#define slowpwm (TCCR2B = (TCCR2B & B11111000) | B00000100)#endif#define BUF_SIZE 1000uint8_t bufa[BUF_SIZE];const byte check = 1<= 237.2 KHz !!!!!*/void startad(){unsigned long starttime, endtime;startit = false;cli(); // disable interruptsmysbi(ADCSRA,ADEN); // enable ADCsei(); // enable interrupts// First conversion- initialises ADCmysbi(ADCSRA,ADSC); while((ADCSRA & check)== check); // wait for ADSC byte to go low// New conversion and use current ADCSRA value for triggerbyte startit = ADCSRA | check;ADCSRA = startit;starttime = micros(); for (unsigned int i = 0; i < BUF_SIZE; i++){ // wait for conversion while((ADCSRA & check)== check); bufa[i] = ADCH; // New conversion ADCSRA = startit; }endtime = micros();cli();mycbi(ADCSRA,ADEN); // disable ADCsei();elapsed = endtime - starttime;writeit = true;}

Hellothank you my friendBut I'm for the purpose of understanding ADC fast even in Arduino Mega and understanding the sampling method of 200KHZ so that the display signal is clean, so you will be able to correct the errors that are in itIt will download you the program you createdIt can be adjusted to take samples from 0-200KhzThank you-This is the program:#include "TimerOne.h"#define FASTADC 1// defines for setting and clearing register bits#ifndef cbi#define cbi(sfr, bit) (_SFR_BYTE(sfr) &= ~_BV(bit))#endif#ifndef sbi#define sbi(sfr, bit) (_SFR_BYTE(sfr) |= _BV(bit))#endifvolatile int value[300]; // variable to store the value coming from the sensorvolatile int i;volatile int p = 0;void setup(){ Serial.begin(9600) ;#if FASTADC // set prescale to 16 sbi(ADCSRA, ADPS2) ; cbi(ADCSRA, ADPS1) ; cbi(ADCSRA, ADPS0) ;#endif Timer1.initialize(10); Timer1.attachInterrupt( timerIsr1 ); // attach the service routine here}void timerIsr1() { if (p == 0) { for ( int i = 0; i < 300; i ++) { value[i] = analogRead(A0); // delayMicroseconds(2); }; p = 1; }}void loop(){ for (i = 0; i < 300; i++) { Serial.println(value[i]); delayMicroseconds(2); }// delayMicroseconds(2); p=0;}

Very nice! One option (for about the same cost) is to use the Teensy 3.1 (http://www.pjrc.com/teensy/teensy31.html) which is a lot faster, especially the A/D conversion (I think it can be done with DMA).

The teensy appears to be 3.3V based. So the Arduino and PC program would run incorrectly, without modification. I have no idea whether the same interrupts and register controls are available on the Teensy. The serial route out is also unclear to me. Not exactly a drop in solution?

Indeed, with the Teensy 3.1 running at 72 Meg and with 64k RAM it seems to me that this beautiful PC interface could be done justice!! We could be looking at a scope fast enough to debug normal Arduinos!!

spectrum analyzers & signal frequency analyzers | tektronix

A spectrum analyzer measures the amplitude of an input signal versus frequency within the full frequency range of the instrument. The primary use is to measure the power of the spectrum of known and unknown signals.

A traditional spectrum analyzer searches for signals within a spectral bandwidth and provides snapshots of the signal in the frequency or modulation domain. However, this is often not enough information to confidently describe the dynamic nature of modern RF signals.

A signal analyzer, however, includes additional functionality like digital signal processing (DSP) that detects, characterizes, and analyzes signals with complex digital modulation. Signal analyzers can be used to perform more complicated measurements and deeper analysis of RF modulated signals.

A signal analyzer provides advanced demodulation and signal analysis capabilities for analyzing modern RF signals. A signal analyzer can measure any characteristic of the signal, including magnitude and phase information. Signal analyzers essentially help engineers detect and characterize RF signals that change over time.

Tektronix analyzers powered bySignalVu spectrum analyzer software, provide advanced signal analysis capabilities. Application-optimized software options are also available for vector signal analysis, pulsed measurements typical in the Radar application space, EMI/EMC pre-compliance testing, RADHAZ detection and more.

Whether youre testing your baseband design for IoT or just for simple EMI sniffing, you should have the 3 Series MDO readily available on your bench. Unlike other oscilloscopes that offer software processed FFT spectrum analysis, the 3 Series has a unique true hardware spectrum analyzer built right in with superior RF test performance and guaranteed RF specifications.

We are the measurement insight company committed to performance, and compelled by possibilities. Tektronix designs and manufactures test and measurement solutions to break through the walls of complexity, and accelerate global innovation.

top 5 best screen and audio recorders for windows

A lot of people are fond of doing screencasting or simply recording their game playing these days. No matter if you have decided to screencast your work or demonstrate a step-by-step tutorial, these things are incomplete without a high-quality screen and audio recorder.

You might be looking for the new and the best screen recording tool if you have used many before and tried using those. That being the case, we have researched and brought some good screen and audio recorders on which this article will focus.

You can also choose this screen or audio recorder to give a try for recording your demonstration or tutorials. Though it has limited functionality, there is no doubt that it is popular among users with its practical features.

The last screen and audio recorder on the list would be OBS that is also loaded with some good features. With coming the options of multiple themes and filters, this recorder makes the video more interesting.

Now, you can create your work without any complications. Although you have five better options and its fully your call to decide which one to go with, we would recommend you DemoCreator to clear any doubts if you have. Thanks for considering this article and giving time to read it.

Want more controls about the recorded audio, like removing the background noise from the recorded video, change video and audio speed, add some audio effects like beep sound, change the audio pitch etc, or add docking fade in and fade out effects, you can try Wondershare Filmora9.

high-speed adcs | overview | analog-to-digital converters

Our high-speed analog-to-digital converter (ADC) portfolio, with sampling speeds up to 10.4 GSPS, offers solutions for high speed conversion applications including aerospace and defense, test and measurement. Enable your system designs with industry-leading high-speed, high performance and low-power device options.

Explore our latest design resources, including our JESD204 Rapid Design IP. With ready-to-use IP for easy FPGA integration, precise RF system models and more, our tools allow you to decrease firmware development time, reduce costly design cycles and accelerate your design from concept to prototype.

On-demand video courses and tutorials including introductory ideas about device architecture in addition to advanced, application-specific problem-solving, using both theory and practical knowledge. Use these hands-on courses to predict circuit performance and move seamlessly from abstract concepts to specific formulae in an easy-to-follow format. Industry experts present each topic in order to help reduce design time and move quickly from proof-of-concept to productization. The ADC (analog-to-digital converter or A/D converter) curriculum is segmented into major topic learning categories, each of which contains short training videos, multiple choice quizzes, and short answer exercises.