inexpensive small batch ball mill

batch ball or rod mill container | sepor, inc

010E-007/008 8 Batch Carbon Steel Rod/Ball Mill, 010E-013/014 8 SS Ball/Rod Mill, 010E-010 Extra Rubber Gasket, 010E-015 Ball Mill Charge, Carbon Steel, 010E-016 Rod Mill Charge, Carbon Steel, 010E-098 Stainless Steel, Ball Mill Charge, 010E-099 SS, Rod Mill Charge

Sepors batch ball and rod mills are designed to give size reduction of laboratory quantities of minerals and ores. Feed size should generally be -1/8, for ball mill and -1/2 for rod mill. They are of a sturdy, rugged design to handle frequent use with hard materials. The batch ball and rod mills require a drive roll to rotate the mill the proper grinding speed, usually 60%- 75% of the critical speed for ball mills and 50% to 90% of critical speed for rod mills.

Sepor, Inc. began business in 1953 with the introduction of the Sepor Microsplitter , a Jones-type Riffle splitter, developed by geologist Oreste Ernie Alessio for his own use in the lab. Sepor grew over the next several decades to offer a complete line of mineral analysis tools, as well as pilot plant equipment for scaled operations.

3 x 5 batch ball mill | sepor, inc

Sepor Inc, whose reputation for high quality lab test and mineral processing equipment is known the world over is now pleased to announce its own line of large ball mills to complement its existing line of small lab batch and continuous mills. The standard ball mill sizes of 3x 5 and 4x 6 will incorporate a robust design with the quality you have come to expect from Sepor products. Sepor mills can be used in wet or dry applications.

The mills utilize industrial class bearings to provide long service life. Heavy duty bearings conform in size and tolerance to either ABMA or ISO standards. The removable bronze inserts are machined for simplified maintenance. The gearing and pinion shafts are reversible for longer life and the mills and guards are to OSHA safety standards.

Sepor, Inc. began business in 1953 with the introduction of the Sepor Microsplitter , a Jones-type Riffle splitter, developed by geologist Oreste Ernie Alessio for his own use in the lab. Sepor grew over the next several decades to offer a complete line of mineral analysis tools, as well as pilot plant equipment for scaled operations.

small ball mills for sale

Our small-scale miners Ball Mills use horizontal rotating cylinders that contain the grinding media and the particles to be broken. The mass moves up the wall of the cylinder as it rotates and falls back into the toe of the mill when the force of gravity exceeds friction and centrifugal forces. Particles are broken in the toe of the mill when caught in the collisions between the grinding media themselves and the grinding media and the mill wall. In ball mills, the grinding media and particles acquire potential energy that becomes kinetic energy as the mass falls from the rotating shell. Ball mills are customarily divided into categories that are mainly defined by the size of the feed particles and the type of grinding media.

Intermediate and fine size reduction by grinding is frequently achieved in a ball mill in which the length of the cylindrical shell is usually 1 to 1.5 times the shell diameter. Ball mills of greater length are termed tube mills, and when hard pebbles rather than steel balls are used for the grinding media, the mills are known as pebble mills. In general, ball mills can be operated either wet or dry and are capable of producing products on the order of 100 um. This duty represents reduction ratios as great as 100.

The ball mill, an intermediate and fine-grinding device, is a tumbling drum with a 40% to 50% filling of balls. The material that is to be ground fills the voids between the balls. The tumbling balls capture the particles in ball/ball or ball/liner events and load them to the point of fracture. Very large tonnages can be ground with these devices because they are very effective material handling devices. The feed can be dry, with less than 3% moisture to minimize ball coating, or a slurry can be used containing 20% to 40% water by weight. Ball mills are employed in either primary or secondary grinding applications. In primary applications, they receive their feed from crushers, and in secondary applications, they receive their feed from rod mills, autogenous mills, or semi-autogenous mills. Regrind mills in mineral processing operations are usually ball mills, because the feed for these applications is typically quite fine. Ball mills are sometimes used in single-stage grinding, receiving crusher product. The circuits of these mills are often closed with classifiers at high-circulating loads.

All ball mills operate on the same principles. One of these principles is that the total weight of the charge in the mill-the sum of the weight of the grinding media, the weight of the material to be ground, and any water in the millis a function of the percentage of the volume of the mill it occupies.

The power the mill draws is a function of the weight of the charge in the mill, the %of volumetric loading of the mill, the %of critical speed, which is the speed in RPM at which the outer layer of the charge in the mill will centrifuge.

For closed grinding circuits producing typical ball mill products, indirect and direct on-line measurements of the product size are available. The indirect means are those which assume that the product size is relatively constant when the feed condition to the classifying unit and the operating conditions in the classifying unit are constant. One example is maintaining a constant mass flow, pulp density and pressure in the feed to the cyclone classifier.

By using math modeling, it is possible to calculate the product size from measured cyclone classifier feed conditions and circuit operating data, thus establishing the effect on the particle size distribution in the product for changes in the variables.

Direct on-line means to measure either particle size or surface area are available for typical ball mill circuit products. These require the means to obtain representative or at least consistent samples from the grinding circuit product stream. These direct means and the calculated product particle size distributions can be used to:

Small variations in the feed size to ball mill circuits generally is not critical to the calculation of operating work index because they make a very small change in the 10F factor. Thus, a computer program can be developed to calculate operating work indices from on-line data with the feed size a constant and with the program designed to permit manually changing this value, as required to take into account changes in feed size resulting from such things as drawing down feed bins, crusher maintenance, work screen surfaces in the crushing plant, etc. which are generally known in advance, or can be established quickly. Developments underway for on-line measurement of particle size in coarser material which when completed will permit measuring the feed size used to calculate operating work indices.

recorded by a data logger, gives continuous means to report comminution circuit performance and evaluate in-plant testing. Changes in Wio indicated on data loggers alert operating and supervisory personnel that a change has occurred in either the ore or in circuit performance. If sufficient instrumentation is available, the cause for a problem can often be located from other recorded or logged data covering circuit and equipment operation, however, generally the problem calls for operator attention to be corrected.

Wio can be used to determine the efficiency of power utilization for the entire comminution section of a mill, and for the individual circuits making up the comminution section. The efficiency of a comminution circuit is determined by the following equation.

Wi is obtained by running the appropriate laboratory tests on a composite sample of circuit feed. Wio is calculated from plant operating data covering the period when the feed sample was taken. Since Wi from laboratory tests refers to specific conditions for accurate efficiency determinations, it is necessary to apply correction factors as discussed in The Tools of Power Power to Wio to put the laboratory and operating data on the same basis.

To-date, there is no known way to obtain standard work index data from on-line tests. Continuous measurement of comminution circuit efficiency is not possible and thus efficiency is not available for circuit control. Using laboratory data and operating data, efficiency can be determined for overall section and individual circuit for evaluation and reporting. Just monitoring Wio and correcting operating problems as they occur will improve the utilization of the power delivered to the comminution circuits.

Samples taken from the chips around blast hole drillings and from broken ore in the pit or mine for laboratory work index and other ore characteristic determinations before the ore is delivered to the mill, can be used to predict in advance comminution circuit performance. Test results can also be used for ore blending to obtain a more uniform feed, particularly to primary autogenous and semi-autogenous circuits.

We sell Small Ball Mills from 2 to 6 (600 mm X 1800 mm) in diameter and as long as 10 (3000 mm) in length. The mills are manufactured using a flanged mild steel shell, cast heads, overflow discharge, removable man door, spur type ring gear, pinion gear assembly with spherical roller bearings, replaceable roller bronze trunnion bearings, oil lubrication, replaceable trunnion liners with internal spirals, rubber liners and lifters, feed spout with wash port, discharge trommel with internal spiral, motor and gear reducer drive, direct coupled to pinion gear, gear guard and modular steel support frame. All ball mills always come withOSHA-type gear guard.

A PULP level sufficiently high to interpose a bed of pulp, partly to cushion the impact of the balls, permits a maximum crushing effect with a minimum wear of steel. The pulp level of theseSmall Ball Millscan be varied from discharging at the periphery to discharging at a point about halfway between the trunnion and the periphery.The mill shell is of welded plate steel with integral end flanges turned for perfect alignment, and the heads are semi-steel, with hand holes in the discharge end through which the diaphragm regulation is arranged with plugs.The trunnion bearings are babbitted, spherical, cast iron, and of ample size to insure low bearing pressure; while the shell and saddle are machined to gauge so that the shells are interchangeable.

Data based on:Wet grinding, single stage, closed circuit operation: feed:( one way dimension); Class III ore. All mills:free discharge, grated type, rapid pulp flow. N. B.for overflow type mills: capacity 80%power 83%. Dimensions :diameters inside shell without linerslengths working length shell between end liners.

The CIW is a Small Ball Mill thats belt driven, rigid bearing, wet grinding, trunnion or grate discharge type mill with friction clutch pulley and welded steel shell. The 7 and 8 foot diameter mills are of flange ring construction with cut gears while all other sizes have cast tooth gears. All these mills are standard with white iron bar wave type shell liners except the 8 foot diameter mill which is equipped with manganese steel liners. The horsepowers shown in the table are under running conditions so that high torque or wound rotor (slip ring) motors must be used. Manganese or alloy steel shell or head liners and grates can be supplied with all sizes of mills if required. Alloy steel shell liners are recommended where 4 or larger balls are used and particularly for the larger sized mills.

Small (Muleback Type) Ball Mill is built for muleback transportation in 30 and 3 diameters (inside liners). A 4 (Muleback Type) Ball Mill is of special design and will be carefully considered upon request. Mankinds search for valuable minerals often leads him far away from modern transportation facilities. The potential sources of gold, silver and strategic minerals are often found by the prospector, not close by our modern highways, but far back in the mountains and deserts all over the world. The Equipment Company has realized this fact, and therefore has designed a Ball Mill that can be transported to these faraway and relatively inaccessible properties, either by the age old muleback transportation system, or by the modern airplane. As a result these properties may now obtain a well-designed ball mill with the heaviest individual piece weighing only 350 pounds.

The prime factor considered in this design was to furnish equipment having a maximum strength with a minimum weight. For this reason, these mills are made of steel, giving a high tensile strength and light weight to the mills. The muleback design consists of the sturdy cast iron head construction on the 30 size and cast steel head construction on the larger sizes. The flanges on the heads are arranged to bolt to the rolled steel shell provided with flanged rings. When required, the total length of the shell may consist of several shell lengths flanged together to provide the desired mill length. Liners, bearings, gears and drives are similar to those standard on all Ball Mills.

This (Convertible) and Small Ball Mill is unique in design and is particularly adapted to small milling plants. The shell is cast in one piece with a flange for bolting to the head. In converting the mill from a 30x 18 to a 30x 36 unit with double the capacity, it is only necessary to secure a second cast shell (a duplicate of the first) and bolt it to the original section.

30 Convertible Ball Mills are furnished with scoop feeders with replaceable lips. Standard mills are furnished with liners to avoid replacement of the shell; however, themill can be obtained less liners. This ball mill is oftendriven by belts placed around the center, although gear drive units with cast gears can be furnished. A Spiral Screen can be attached to the discharge.

This mill may be used for batch or intermittent grinding, or mixing of dry or wet materials in the ore dressing industry, metallurgical, chemical, ceramic, or paint industries. The material is ground and mixed in one operation by rotating it together with balls, or pebbles in a hermetically sealed cylinder.

The cast iron shell which is bolted to the heads is made with an extra thick wall to give long wearing life. Two grate cleanout doors are provided on opposite sides of the shell by means of which the mill can be either gradually discharged and washed, while running, or easily and rapidly emptied and flushedout while shut down. Wash-water is introduced into the interior of the mill through a tapped opening in the trunnion. The mill may be lined with rubber, silex (buhrstone) or wood if desired.

The Hardinge Conical Ball Mill has been widely used with outstanding success in grinding many materials in a wide variety of fields. The conical mill operates on the principle of an ordinary ball mill with a certain amount of classification within the mill itself, due to its shape.

Sizes of conical mills are given in diameter of the cylindrical section in feet and the length of the cylindrical section in inches. Liners can be had of hard iron, manganese steel or Belgian Silex. Forged steel balls or Danish Flint Pebbles are used for the grinding media, depending upon the material being milled.

The Steel Head Ball-Rod Mill gives the ore dressing engineer a wide choice in grinding design so that he can easily secure a Ball-Rod Mill suited to his particular problem. The successful operation of any grinding unit is largely dependent on the method of removing the ground pulp. The Ball-Rod Mill is available with five types of discharge trunnions, each type obtainable in small, medium or large diameters. The types of discharge trunnions are:

The superiority of the Steel Head Ball-Rod Mill is due to the all steel construction. The trunnions are an integral part of the cast steel heads and are machined with the axis of the mill. The mill heads are assured against breakage due to the high tensile strength of cast steel as compared to that of the cast iron head found on the ordinary ball mill. Trunnion Bearings are made of high- grade nickel babbitt.

Steel Head Ball-Rod Mills can be converted intolarger capacity mills by bolting an additional shell lengthonto the flange of the original shell. This is possible because all Steel Head Ball or Rod Mills have bearings suitable for mills with length twice the diameter.

Head and shell liners for Steel Head Ball-Rod Mills are available in Decolloy (a chrome-nickel alloy), hard iron, electric steel, molychrome steel, and manganese steel. Drive gears are furnished either in cast tooth spur gear and pinion or cut tooth spur gear and pinion. The gears are furnished as standard on the discharge end of the mill, out of the way of the classifier return feed, but can be furnished at the mill feed end by request. Drives may be obtained according to the customers specifications.

Thats one characteristic of Traylor Ball Millsliked by ownersthey are built not only to do a first class job at low cost but to keep on doing it, year after year. Of course, that means we do not build as many mills as if they wore out quicklyor would we? but much as welike order, we value more the fine reputationTraylor Ball Mills have had for nearly threedecades.

Thats one characteristic of Traylor Ball Mills We dont aim to write specifications into thisliked by ownersthey are built not only to do advertisementlet it suffice to say that theresa first class job at low cost but to keep on do- a Traylor Ball Mills that will exactly fit anyanything it, year after year. Of course, that means requirement that anyone may have.

If this is true, there is significance in the factthat international Nicked and Climax Molybdenum, theworlds largest producers of two important steel alloys, areboth users of MARCY Mills exclusively. With international interest centered on increasingproduction of gold, it is even more significant that MARCYMills are the predominant choice of operators in everyimportants gold mining camp in the world.

Ball Mill. Intermediate and fine size reduction by grinding is frequently achieved in a ball mill in which the length of the cylindrical shell is usually 1 to 1.5 times the shell diameter. Ball mills of greater length are termed tube mills, and when hard pebbles rather than steel balls are used for the grinding media, the mills are known as pebble mills. In general, ball mills can be operated either wet or dry and are capable of producing products on the order of 100 pm. This duty represents reduction ratios as great as 100.

The ball mill, an intermediate and fine-grinding device, is a tumbling drum with a 40% to 50% filling of balls (usually steel or steel alloys). The material that is to be ground fills the voids between the balls. The tumbling balls capture the particles in ball/ball or ball/liner events and load them to the point of fracture. Very large tonnages can be ground with these devices because they are very effective material handling devices. The feed can be dry, with less than 3% moisture to minimize ball coating, or a slurry can be used containing 20% to 40% water by weight. Ball mills are employed in either primary or secondary grinding applications. In primary applications, they receive their feed from crushers, and in secondary applications, they receive their feed from rod mills, autogenous mills, or semiautogenous mills. Regrind mills in mineral processing operations are usually ball mills, because the feed for these applications is typically quite fine. Ball mills are sometimes used in single-stage grinding, receiving crusher product. The circuits of these mills are often closed with classifiers at high-circulating loads.

These loads maximize throughput at a desired product size. The characteristics of ball mills are summarized in the Table, which lists typical feed and product sizes. The size of the mill required to achieve a given task-that is, the diameter (D) inside the liners-can be calculated from the design relationships given. The design parameters must be specified.

The liner- and ball-wear equations are typically written in terms of an abrasion index (Bond 1963). The calculated liner and ball wear is expressed in kilograms per kilowatt-hour (kg/kWh), and when multiplied by the specific power (kWh/t), the wear rates are given in kilograms per ton of feed. The wear in dry ball mills is approximately one-tenth of that in wet ball mills because of the inhibition of corrosion. The efficiency of ball mills as measured relative to single-particle slow-compression loading is about 5%. Abrasion indices for five materials are also listed in the Table.

The L/D ratios of ball mills range from slightly less than 1:1 to something greater than 2:1. The tube and compartment ball mills commonly used in the cement industry have L/D ratios 2.75:1 or more. The fraction of critical speed that the mill turns depends on the application, and most mills operate at around 75% of critical speed. Increased speed generally means increased power, but as the simulations presented in Figure 3.26 show, it can also produce more wasted ball impacts on the liners above the toe. causing more wear and less breakage.

There are three principal forms of discharge mechanism. In the overflow ball mill, the ground product overflows through the discharge end trunnion. A diaphragm ball mill has a grate at thedischarge end. The product flows through the slots in the grate. Pulp lifters may be used to discharge the product through the trunnion, or peripheral ports may be used to discharge the product.

The majority of grinding balls are forged carbon or alloy steels. Generally, they are spherical, but other shapes have been used. The choice of the top (or recharge) ball size can be made using empirical equations developed by Bond or Azzaroni or by using special batch-grinding tests interpreted in the content of population balance models. The effect of changes in ball size on specific selection functions has been found to be different for different materials. A ball size-correction method can be used along with the specific selection function scale-up method to determine the best ball size. To do this, a set of ball size tests are performed in a batch mill from which the specific selection function dependence on ball size can be determined. Then, the mill capacities used to produce desired product size can be predicted by simulation using the kinetic parameter corresponding to the different ball sizes.

The mill liners used are constructed from cast alloy steels, wear-resistant cast irons, or polymer (rubber) and polymer metal combinations. The mill liner shapes often recommended in new mills are double-wave liners when balls less than 2.5 in. are used and single-wave liners when larger balls are used. Replaceable metal lifter bars are sometimes used. End liners are usually ribbed or employ replaceable lifters.

The typical mill-motor coupling is a pinion and gear. On larger mills two motors may be used, and in that arrangement two pinions drive one gear on the mill. Synchronous motors are well suited to the ball mill, because the power draw is almost constant. Induction, squirrel cage, and slip ring motors are also used. A high-speed motor running 600 to 1,000 rpm requires a speed reducer between the motor and pinion shaft. The gearless drive has been installed at a number of locations around the world.

the 12 best bourbons under $50 to drink in 2021

If youre looking for some really good bourbon to drink, the good news is you dont have to spend hundreds of dollars on a bottle. In fact, some of the best bourbons available throughout the country cost less than $50. Sure, there are some rare bottles out there going for triple their asking price on the secondary market, and some of these are exceptional. Still, there are so many dependable and accessible offeringshere are the best bourbons under $50 to try today.

While there are some wildly popular and rare bourbons made at Buffalo Trace, there's no better affordable option than the distillery's flagship bourbon. It uses a low-rye mash bill that provides notes of vanilla, caramel and sweet corn. According to bartender and beverage consultant Jessica Gonzalez, this should be your go-to bourbon for making an Old Fashioned. It's priced low enough that I won't send anyone to the poorhouse, and no matter what they usually drink, this won't disappoint.

Michters US*1 Bourbon is full of flavors that soar well beyond its under-$50 price point. The brands Shively distillery in Kentucky has been up and running since 2015, and its contract-distilled bourbon is delicious, with complex notes of vanilla, sweet corn, peach, and some dried fruits. Even more, the rich mouthfeel and white pepper finish go a long way towards making this small-batch bourbon an excellent sipping option.

Along with one or two fine sipping bourbons for special occasions, it's crucial to make sure your liquor cabinet is also stocked with a solid workhorse bourbon that you won't lament mixing into a cocktail. It needs to be a robust and well-crafted bourbon, though, one that won't get lost in your cocktail's melange of flavorsand it's hard to imagine a bottle that over-delivers on these attributes more reliably than Wild Turkey 101.

Crafted using the same high-rye mash bill that legendary distiller Jimmy Russell stubbornly adhered to even during the wheated bourbon craze of the '80s and '90s, Wild Turkey's flagship whiskey boasts assertive notes of cinnamon, maple, old leather, white pepper, and charcoal (along with the well-integrated alcohol quotient you'd expect from a 101-proof spirit). And although Wild Turkey 101 will deliver a bold presence in classics like the Manhattan and the Boulevardier, this economically-priced bourbon is balanced enough to sip neat or on the rocksas long as you don't mind a little heat.

I still can't believe they sell it for the price they do, says Stephen Kurpinsky, U.S. brand ambassador for Mr. Black Cold Brew Coffee Liqueur, when asked about the Old Forester 100 Proofwhich has the distinction of being the first bourbon to be sold in sealed bottles, rather than barrels.

Bartenders and drinkers in the know are huge fans of Old Forester, which is part of the Brown-Forman company that also makes Woodford Reserve and Jack Daniels. If you are looking to pick up a bourbon at a good price that you can mix with and not feel like your wallet is burning, this is the bourbon for you," says Kurpinsky. "It's great on its own, awesome in a smash, sour or Old Fashioned, and doesn't get lost thanks to not being watered down. Theres also a bit of spice on the palate in this bourbon, which complements the sweetness very nicely.

Bourbon does not have to be made in Kentuckyall that's required is a mash bill of at least 51 percent corn (with the remainder made up of any combination of other grains like rye, wheat, and malted barley), plus a period of aging in charred new oak barrels, and a few requirements regarding proofing. But Kentucky is the spiritual home of bourbon, and a great deal of it is produced in the stateincluding the iconic Woodford Reserve. Their Kentucky straight bourbon is full of notes that define the iconic American whiskey category: slight tannins and vanilla sweetness from the oak, bright cereal notes from the grains, and a bit of spice on the finish.

Beyond Kentucky, you can find distilleries making bourbon in nearly every state nowadays, from tiny craft operations to larger upstart facilities. One notable distillery is Woodinville Whiskey. Its flagship straight bourbon is aged for five years in central Washington warehouses after being distilled just outside of Seattle. The rich palate of buttery caramel, sweet vanilla and ripe fruits can compete with any bourbon made in Kentucky. Its bottled at 90 proof, but if youre looking for something stronger, there's a barrel-proof version offered at the distillery as well.

Wheated bourbons are defined as having a mash bill that uses wheat as the secondary flavoring grain instead of the usual rye (along with corn and malted barley). This imbues the bourbon with a softer, slightly sweeter flavor profile, minus the trademark spice notes of rye. If you have not tried a wheated bourbon before, pick up a bottle of Larceny: made by Heaven Hill, this bourbon uses one-third more wheat than other similar bourbons, according to the distillery. Its aged for six years and has notes of honey, caramel and even some stone fruits.

Every bourbon must be made of at least 51 percent corn, but distillers have the option to split the remainder between additional corn, wheat, malted barley, or other grains. Historically, the top "remainder" grain would've typically been rye, and if a contemporary distiller uses rye as the majority of their remaining mash bill, the resulting sturdy and spicy bourbon is often referred to as "high-rye."

Very few distillers will actually put this phrase right on the bottle, thoughbut in the case of Indiana's Redemption Whiskey, who market a bourbon in which rye makes up a whopping 36 percent of the mash bill, why not? Redemption's High Rye Bourbon is a fresh and highly aromatic bourbon in which a bouquet of mint and oregano leads into a vibrant palate featuring notes of black pepper, fennel, caramel and ginger.

Although the term small batch isn't legally defined in the bourbon market, it generally means it's smaller than the regular batch of barrels that go into bottling. Rowan's Creek, named after the actual creek that flows through the historic and family-owned Willett Distillery, is an excellent small-batch bourbon that's won multiple gold medals at the San Fransisco World Spirits Competition. Bottled at just a hair over 100 proof, Rowan's Creek beckons one into the glass with playful aromas of spice and mint, while the palate is rich and woody, featuring sumptuous notes of molasses and chocolate.

Take a moment to admire the dark amber colorunlike their colleagues in Scotland, distillers of Kentucky straight bourbon aren't permitted to add artificial coloring, so the whiskey's robust hue is solely the result of the years of aging in charred barrels.

As its name suggests, a single barrel is a bourbon that comes from one barrel instead of the usual blend of many different barrels that go into a batch. So, each barrel will taste different, although there is usually some consistency that allows the discerning imbiber to identify the brand. In the case of Evan Williams, the single-barrel expression always tastes good.

One could say using this in cocktails is almost cheating. Try it in a Paper Plane or an egg white sour and you won't be disappointed. It works stirred as well, especially with lighter ingredients like sherry or vermouth. Jessica Gonzalez, bartender and beverage consultant

All the whiskey produced at Kentucky-based New Riff Distilling is bottled in bond (aside from the barrel-proof expressions), which means it fits certain requirements: its bottled at 100 proof, is at least four years old, and is the product of one distillation season and one distillery. The straight bourbon is made from a mash bill of 65 percent corn, 30 percent rye and 5 percent malted barley, putting it in the high-rye category. This comes through on the palate, which starts with some sticky toffee, eases into ripe cherries, and finishes with some sweet vanilla.

"Barrel-proof bourbon" refers to a whiskey that has not been cut with water before bottling to reduce the ABV, resulting in a proof that may be well over 100. And while there are a number of quality high-proof bourbons offered for under $50 (e.g. Old Grand-Dad 114 and 1776 Full-Proof), it can be difficult to find a true, undiluted barrel-proof bourbon in that price range. The introduction in 2020 by Maker's Mark of a barrel-proof (or "cask strength") version of their iconic bourbon offered budget-minded consumers the opportunity to finally enjoy a full-bodied, high-octane take on their timeless flavor profile of caramel and stone fruit.

The darling of the bourbon category in decades past, Maker's Mark has largely been eclipsed in the affections of today's generation of connoisseurs by a dizzying range of cult bottlings and hard-to-find special releases. But those discerning buyers who make the wise choice to try the Maker's Mark Cask Strength will be rewarded by a rich and assertive palate bursting with flavors of orange peel, vanilla, cherry, and tobacco, as well as enough structure and body to stand up to being served on a big piece of iceall at a fraction of the cost of the cult whiskeys du jour.

In today's craft whiskey renaissance, any reader in America may well have a local distillery making bourbon not far from home, and we encourage all aspiring aficionados to sample the in-state offerings and patronize their local distillers. But it's always useful to have a classic benchmark or two against which new entries to the category may be measuredand as far as standard-bearers in the $50-and-under range go, it's hard to do better than Michter's US*1 (view on ReserveBar) for a smooth and elegant sipping bourbon or than Wild Turkey 101 (view on Drizly) for a bold, robust, cocktail-friendly offering.

Bourbon is a category of whiskey that's defined by several different types of regulations (geographical, grain composition, aging, proofing, etc.), just like scotch whisky, Irish whiskey, Japanese whisky, etc. Specifically, bourbon produced for consumption in the U.S. must comprise at least 51 percent corn, must be aged in charred new oak barrels (for a minimum of two years to be called "straight bourbon"), must be distilled to no more than 160 proof, must be entered into the barrel at no more than 125 proof, and must be bottled at 80 proof or more. It is not the case, though, that all bourbon needs to be produced in Kentucky, despite the well-circulated rumor.

Within any fine beverage category, there's at least some correlation between price and qualitybut for bourbon, more so than many other spirits, that general rule really ceases to apply on the extreme ends of the scale. On the budget end, there are some excellent bottles available for half the price you'd expect to pay for a scotch or a Japanese whisky of similar quality (see all the entries above!), while in the upper echelons of cost, there are a handful of cult-status bourbons whose exorbitant prices reflect their scarcity and their "status symbol" appeal far more than the baseline quality of the juice inside.

A rich, high-proof bourbon loves a big, gorgeous piece of ice, while a more elegant bourbon will shine with just a few drops of water, or might even be best served neat. Meanwhile, your economy-priced bourbons will often beg to be mixed into a cocktail: you can go classy and whip up a full-bodied Old Fashioned or Manhattan, but let's not forget the simple pleasure of a bourbon-and-cola enjoyed while watching the sunset on a humid summer's evening.

This article was edited by Jesse Porter, who finds that keeping a bottle of bourbon on his desk next to his computer helps improve his overall workflow and thus writes it off monthly as a business expense.

Jonah Flickeris an experienced writer who has been covering spirits and traveling the world visiting distilleries for the past six years. His work has appeared in many different national outlets covering trends, new releases, and the stories and innovators behind the spirits. His first love remains whiskey, but he is partial to tequila, rum, gin, cognac and all things distilled.

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Cutting mills are designed for grinding soft, medium-hard, tough, elastic, fibrous materials, as well as heterogeneous mixes of products. The heavy-duty Cutting Mill SM 300 excels especially in the tough ...

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Overview Reproducible comminution for a wide range of samples The quietly operating Knife Mill PULVERISETTE 11 is the ideal laboratory mixer in industry quality for very fast and gentle comminution and homogenisation ...

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how i built a quick and easy home-made ball mill

Anyone who has looked through my web site can see that I am fascinated with glass. I like to melt it, cast it, fuse it and turn it into new things. Eventually I got the idea of doing the ultimate glass hack and making my own glass from scratch. For that I needed a way of grinding and mixing the chemicals that would make up a batch of glass into a very fine and homogeneously mixed powder. I needed a ball mill. So naturally I decided to build my own. Here it is in all it's bodged together glory. It doesn't look like much, but it works great, and it cost almost nothing to build. As a bonus, this ball mill can also be used as a rock tumbler, or a glass tumbler to make your own "sea glass" at home. To use the mill as a rock tumbler, just leave out the steel balls, add rocks, tumbling grit and water, and let it spin.

Here is a video of my home-made ball mill in operation with a brief explanation of all the parts and how I put it together. For detailed descriptions of all the parts, how I built it, and how I use it, read further down this page.

The drum I used for the ball mill was originally a plastic container that held abrasive grit used in vibratory tumblers. It is about two liters in size. I had several empty containers of this type, and decided to put them to use in this project. They work pretty well in this application. There are a few potential problems. The container lids are not liquid-tight. So use as a rock tumbler would require adding a cork or rubber gasket. Also, a little bit of the plastic does get ground off the inside surface and contaminates the batch being ground. This is not a problem for my application because anything organic will be vaporized out of the mix long before it reaches melting temperature in my kiln. Contamination might be an issue for other uses. A steel drum would probably work better if you can find one, or make one, but it would be a lot louder in use.

Here you can see an overview of the ball mill with the drum removed. Construction is super simple. Just three pieces of wood plank banged together to make a platform for mounting all the parts. The platform is made from a 1X10 wooden plank 14 inches long. It sits on two pieces of 1X4 wood. Four inexpensive fixed caster wheels were mounted on top of the platform for the drum to roll on. They were mounted about 2 inches in from the edges of the platform, and 7.5 inches apart. The drive motor was mounted on the underside of the platform, and the dive belt comes up through a slot in the platform.

Here is a close-up showing how two of the caster wheels are mounted. The slot in the middle of the platform for the belt to pass through is also visible. The fixed caster wheels were quite inexpensive, and were one of the few items I actually had to buy to build this project.

Here is a close-up of the other side of the platform and the other two caster wheels. Also shown is a stop mounted on one side of the platform. It was found early on in using the mill that the drum tended to slowly walk toward one side and would eventually drop off the wheels. So I found a scrap piece of aluminum and mounted it the end the drum walked toward to act as a stop. The drum riding against the smooth aluminum surface doesn't seem to produce much friction.

The ball mill is powered by a fairly robust 12V DC motor salvaged from a junked printer. It had a pulley for a fine-toothed belt on it. It was left in place and it seems to drive the heavy round rubber belt well without slipping. The motor was mounted using screws on only one side, which were deliberately left loose. This allows the motor to pivot downward under its own weight to put tension on the belt.

A long, narrow slot was cut in the platform for the belt to pass through. I did it by marking out where I wanted it, drilling a hole at each end, and then cutting out the material between the holes with a jigsaw.

This photo shows the makeshift end stop that prevents the drum from walking off the casters. It is just a random piece of aluminum I found in my junk collection. It conveniently had some holes already drilled in it which made mounting easy. Just about anything that the drum will ride against nearly frictionlessly will work for a stop.

One of the few things I had to buy for this project, aside from the casters, was the steel balls. I found these online. They were quite inexpensive. I went with 5/8 inch diameter balls, which seem to work well in a mill this size.

I have been powering the ball mill with my bench variable power supply so I could fine tune the rotation speed. I wanted it to turn as fast as possible to speed grinding, but not so fast that centrifugal force pins the balls to the wall of the drum preventing them from tumbling over each other. With a little experimentation, the correct speed was found.

So far, this makeshift mill has worked well for me. It has been run for long periods with no problems. It does a good job of reducing even fairly chunky material into a very fine powder, and thoroughly mixing everything. The only real problem I have faced is accidentally over-filling the drum a few times. The drum should not be too full or the balls and material to be ground won't have enough free space to tumble around.

After a milling run, the contents of the drum are dumped out into a sieve over a bowl. With a few shakes of the sieve, the powder drops through the mesh into the bowl leaving the balls behind to be put back in the drum. The sieve also catches any bits that haven't been sufficiently ground down.

I need to add a disclaimer here for anyone thinking of using this sort of ball mill for milling gunpowder or other flammable or explosive powders. First of all, it is really not a good idea. You could cause a fire or explosion and destroy your place, or maybe even get yourself hurt or killed. So don't do it, and if you do it, don't blame me if something bad happens. I'll be saying I told you so. Also do not to use steel, ceramic or glass balls to grind flammable or explosive materials because they can create sparks as they bang against each other while they tumble.

Future improvements: The plastic container I am using is really thick-walled and sturdy, but using it in this application will eventually wear it out. I also get some plastic contamination in the materials I grind in it. So in the future I would like to replace the plastic container with a piece of large diameter steel or iron pipe with end caps. That should also help improve the grinding action as the steel balls bash against the hard walls of the pipe. If I switch to a steel or iron container, which would be heavier, I might also have to beef up the motor driving the unit. We'll see,

Other applications: As I mentioned at the top of the page, and in the attached video, this setup could also be used as a rock tumbler. The plastic container would be ideal for that. Another possible application for this unit is for grinding samples of gold ore, and maybe other metallic ores. One of my many hobbies is gold prospecting. It's often necessary to grind an ore sample to release all the fine particles of gold it contains so they can be separated. This unit may get used for that in the future too.

[Back to Mike's Homepage] [Email me] Other places to visit: [Mike's telescope workshop] [Mike's home-built jet engine page] [Mike's Home-Built Wind Turbine page] [Mike's Home-Built Solar Panel page] Copyright 2014-2018 Michael Davis, All rights reserved.

[Back to Mike's Homepage] [Email me] Other places to visit: [Mike's telescope workshop] [Mike's home-built jet engine page] [Mike's Home-Built Wind Turbine page] [Mike's Home-Built Solar Panel page] Copyright 2014-2018 Michael Davis, All rights reserved.

[Mike's telescope workshop] [Mike's home-built jet engine page] [Mike's Home-Built Wind Turbine page] [Mike's Home-Built Solar Panel page] Copyright 2014-2018 Michael Davis, All rights reserved.