iron ore mining project in indonesia

indo mines to start construction of iron ore project in indonesia

Australian firm Indo Mines is planning to start construction of its $1bn iron ore project, located in Java, an island of Indonesia, in December 2011. Mudrajad Kuncoro, a local government official in Yogyakarta, central Java said the ministry is expected to issue the permit in November to Jogja Magasa Iron, which will own a 30% stake in the project. The project will also include a processing plant with production capacity of one million tons of pig iron and two million tons of iron concentrate a year and a coal-fired power plant. The project will also include an oxygen plant, water treatment facility and a port. Once operational in three to five years time, the project is expected to produce nine to 15 million tons of iron ore a year and will consume around 1.2 million tons of coal annually, reports Reuters. Related Companies Advantage PressurePro Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile Link N Light High-Performance LED Strip Lighting for Adverse Mining Environments 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile Justrite Safety Group Cable and Hose Protection, Wheel Chocks and Warning Whips 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile

Mudrajad Kuncoro, a local government official in Yogyakarta, central Java said the ministry is expected to issue the permit in November to Jogja Magasa Iron, which will own a 30% stake in the project. The project will also include a processing plant with production capacity of one million tons of pig iron and two million tons of iron concentrate a year and a coal-fired power plant. The project will also include an oxygen plant, water treatment facility and a port. Once operational in three to five years time, the project is expected to produce nine to 15 million tons of iron ore a year and will consume around 1.2 million tons of coal annually, reports Reuters. Related Companies Advantage PressurePro Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile Link N Light High-Performance LED Strip Lighting for Adverse Mining Environments 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile Justrite Safety Group Cable and Hose Protection, Wheel Chocks and Warning Whips 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile

The project will also include a processing plant with production capacity of one million tons of pig iron and two million tons of iron concentrate a year and a coal-fired power plant. The project will also include an oxygen plant, water treatment facility and a port. Once operational in three to five years time, the project is expected to produce nine to 15 million tons of iron ore a year and will consume around 1.2 million tons of coal annually, reports Reuters. Related Companies Advantage PressurePro Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile Link N Light High-Performance LED Strip Lighting for Adverse Mining Environments 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile Justrite Safety Group Cable and Hose Protection, Wheel Chocks and Warning Whips 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile

The project will also include an oxygen plant, water treatment facility and a port. Once operational in three to five years time, the project is expected to produce nine to 15 million tons of iron ore a year and will consume around 1.2 million tons of coal annually, reports Reuters. Related Companies Advantage PressurePro Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile Link N Light High-Performance LED Strip Lighting for Adverse Mining Environments 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile Justrite Safety Group Cable and Hose Protection, Wheel Chocks and Warning Whips 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile

Once operational in three to five years time, the project is expected to produce nine to 15 million tons of iron ore a year and will consume around 1.2 million tons of coal annually, reports Reuters. Related Companies Advantage PressurePro Tire Pressure Monitoring Systems (TPMS) 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile Link N Light High-Performance LED Strip Lighting for Adverse Mining Environments 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile Justrite Safety Group Cable and Hose Protection, Wheel Chocks and Warning Whips 28 Aug 2020 Visit Profile

australian iron ore fortescue metals group eyeing geothermal investment in indonesia | thinkgeoenergy - geothermal energy news

The Indonesian government and Australian Fortescue Metals Group, the fourth largest iron ore producer in the world, have signed an agreement on cooperation to develop geothermal and hydropower resources in Australia.

Australia, through the CEO of Fortescue Metals Group (FMG) Andrew Forrest, is eyeing the development of Indonesias geothermal environmentally friendly energy of 25 GW. FMG is an Australian iron and nickel mining company that is among the top 10 in the world. To open the plan, Andrew Forrest met President Joko Widodo September 3, 2020. During the meeting, the President immediately assigned the Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment (Marvest) Luhut Binsar Panjaitan. The next day, September 4, 2020, Coordinating Minister for Marvest, Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, Indonesias Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment, and Andrew Forrest, founder of Fortescue Metals Group (FMG, signed a Deed of Agreement on Green Industry at the Kemenkomarvest, Jakarta. In the agreement, FMG will invest in the green industry sector by developing a geothermal power plant (PLTP). Apart from geothermal, FMG will also develop a hydroelectric power plant (PLTA). [Note the original news piece reports a 25 GW geothermal plant and a 60 GW hydro power plant, both are rather unrealistic numbers with the current overall installed geothermal power generation capacity in Indonesia of around 2,130 MW and total potential of around 29,000 MW or 29 GW] Investments in power plants, excluding additional infrastructure, will cost around tens of billions of dollars, said Luhut after the signing. Luhut stated that the huge investment would have a positive impact on Indonesia. To make this happen, both parties will form a task force consisting of representatives from the government and FMG to ensure the investment is carried out as quickly as possible. Australias interest in Indonesias geothermal energy has actually been sparked since 10 years ago. In 2011, Australias Minister of Energy and Tourism, Martin Ferguson met with Vice President Boediono. Martin expressed Australias interest in investing in and developing geothermal in Indonesia. Various Australian players, among them Panax Geothermal and Origin have been working on development of geothermal resources in Indonesia. Around ten years ago, Panax Geothermal Limited, was eyeing two Indonesian geothermal fields, namely Sokoria on Flores Island and Dairi Prima in North Sumatra. Australian power utility Origin had a joint venture with Indian Tata Power for geothermal development at Sorik Marapi. Both though were never realised by these Australian players and subsequently sold. Both of these projects were taken over by KS Orka and the Sorik Marapi geothermal power plant has started Andrew Forrest himself was named the third richest person in Australia is the founder and former CEO of Fortescue Metals Group. In similar news, it has been reported that Andrew Forrest for Forgescue Metals has had discussions and meetings on potential hydro and geothermal development in Papua New Guinea as well. In June 2020, Fortescue Metals Group announced its zero emissions target for 2040, eyeing more renewable energy use for its operations. In Australia the company is planning to run one of its mines on solar alone during the day and battery over night. Source: Panas Bumi

Australia, through the CEO of Fortescue Metals Group (FMG) Andrew Forrest, is eyeing the development of Indonesias geothermal environmentally friendly energy of 25 GW. FMG is an Australian iron and nickel mining company that is among the top 10 in the world.

To open the plan, Andrew Forrest met President Joko Widodo September 3, 2020. During the meeting, the President immediately assigned the Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment (Marvest) Luhut Binsar Panjaitan.

The next day, September 4, 2020, Coordinating Minister for Marvest, Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, Indonesias Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment, and Andrew Forrest, founder of Fortescue Metals Group (FMG, signed a Deed of Agreement on Green Industry at the Kemenkomarvest, Jakarta.

In the agreement, FMG will invest in the green industry sector by developing a geothermal power plant (PLTP). Apart from geothermal, FMG will also develop a hydroelectric power plant (PLTA). [Note the original news piece reports a 25 GW geothermal plant and a 60 GW hydro power plant, both are rather unrealistic numbers with the current overall installed geothermal power generation capacity in Indonesia of around 2,130 MW and total potential of around 29,000 MW or 29 GW]

Luhut stated that the huge investment would have a positive impact on Indonesia. To make this happen, both parties will form a task force consisting of representatives from the government and FMG to ensure the investment is carried out as quickly as possible.

Australias interest in Indonesias geothermal energy has actually been sparked since 10 years ago. In 2011, Australias Minister of Energy and Tourism, Martin Ferguson met with Vice President Boediono. Martin expressed Australias interest in investing in and developing geothermal in Indonesia.

Various Australian players, among them Panax Geothermal and Origin have been working on development of geothermal resources in Indonesia. Around ten years ago, Panax Geothermal Limited, was eyeing two Indonesian geothermal fields, namely Sokoria on Flores Island and Dairi Prima in North Sumatra. Australian power utility Origin had a joint venture with Indian Tata Power for geothermal development at Sorik Marapi. Both though were never realised by these Australian players and subsequently sold.

In June 2020, Fortescue Metals Group announced its zero emissions target for 2040, eyeing more renewable energy use for its operations. In Australia the company is planning to run one of its mines on solar alone during the day and battery over night.

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rogetta iron ore project - one of the biggest iron ore mines in tasmania

Rogetta iron ore project is a greenfield open-pit iron ore mine being developed by Forward Mining. Located approximately 30km south of Burnie, near Hampshire, Australia, it is the biggest iron ore mine being developed in Tasmania in the last 50 years. Forward Mining received environmental approval for the project in June 2018 and expects to start construction in 2019. The project is estimated to require an investment of $100m. It is expected to produce one million tonnes (Mt) of magnetite iron ore concentrates a year, over its estimated mine life of eight years, starting from 2020. The project is expected to create 200 jobs during construction and 100 permanent jobs during the operational phase.

Forward Mining received environmental approval for the project in June 2018 and expects to start construction in 2019. The project is estimated to require an investment of $100m. It is expected to produce one million tonnes (Mt) of magnetite iron ore concentrates a year, over its estimated mine life of eight years, starting from 2020. The project is expected to create 200 jobs during construction and 100 permanent jobs during the operational phase.

It is expected to produce one million tonnes (Mt) of magnetite iron ore concentrates a year, over its estimated mine life of eight years, starting from 2020. The project is expected to create 200 jobs during construction and 100 permanent jobs during the operational phase.

Rogetta iron ore project is based on the Rogetta North iron ore deposit located in the Kara mining district near Hampshire. Rogetta iron ore project background Forward Mining acquired the project in 2012 and renamed it as Rogetta iron ore project. Rogetta iron ore project reserves Rogetta iron ore mine is estimated contain 25.9Mt of iron ore resources grading 31.06% Fe. The resource estimate includes 11.6Mt of measured and 13.9Mt of indicated iron ore resources, at cut-off grades of 31.98% and 30.25%, respectively. Mining and processing at Rogetta iron ore project Rogetta will be an open-pit mine involving drill-blast-haul operations. The mining fleet will comprise a dozer, an excavator, four rigid dump trucks for mining operations up to 60m below ground, and five articulated dump trucks for mining operations at depths beyond 60m below ground. The mine pit will be dewatered with the help of dewatering bores or in-pit sumps. The extracted ore will be hauled to the run-of-mine (ROM) pad situated on the edge of the pit, where it will be crushed in a mobile primary jaw crusher. The waste rock will be trucked to the waste rock dumps. The crushed ore will be stockpiled before being sent to the on-site processing facility, where it undergoes magnetic separation for the production of iron ore concentrates. The concentrates will be stockpiled before being trucked to the Burnie Port for shipping. The tailings slurry from the processing plant will be fed to a tailings storage facility through a 3km-long tailing pipeline. An estimated 13.9Mt of tailings will be generated over the mine life. Production from Rogetta iron ore mine The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

Rogetta iron ore project background Forward Mining acquired the project in 2012 and renamed it as Rogetta iron ore project. Rogetta iron ore project reserves Rogetta iron ore mine is estimated contain 25.9Mt of iron ore resources grading 31.06% Fe. The resource estimate includes 11.6Mt of measured and 13.9Mt of indicated iron ore resources, at cut-off grades of 31.98% and 30.25%, respectively. Mining and processing at Rogetta iron ore project Rogetta will be an open-pit mine involving drill-blast-haul operations. The mining fleet will comprise a dozer, an excavator, four rigid dump trucks for mining operations up to 60m below ground, and five articulated dump trucks for mining operations at depths beyond 60m below ground. The mine pit will be dewatered with the help of dewatering bores or in-pit sumps. The extracted ore will be hauled to the run-of-mine (ROM) pad situated on the edge of the pit, where it will be crushed in a mobile primary jaw crusher. The waste rock will be trucked to the waste rock dumps. The crushed ore will be stockpiled before being sent to the on-site processing facility, where it undergoes magnetic separation for the production of iron ore concentrates. The concentrates will be stockpiled before being trucked to the Burnie Port for shipping. The tailings slurry from the processing plant will be fed to a tailings storage facility through a 3km-long tailing pipeline. An estimated 13.9Mt of tailings will be generated over the mine life. Production from Rogetta iron ore mine The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

Forward Mining acquired the project in 2012 and renamed it as Rogetta iron ore project. Rogetta iron ore project reserves Rogetta iron ore mine is estimated contain 25.9Mt of iron ore resources grading 31.06% Fe. The resource estimate includes 11.6Mt of measured and 13.9Mt of indicated iron ore resources, at cut-off grades of 31.98% and 30.25%, respectively. Mining and processing at Rogetta iron ore project Rogetta will be an open-pit mine involving drill-blast-haul operations. The mining fleet will comprise a dozer, an excavator, four rigid dump trucks for mining operations up to 60m below ground, and five articulated dump trucks for mining operations at depths beyond 60m below ground. The mine pit will be dewatered with the help of dewatering bores or in-pit sumps. The extracted ore will be hauled to the run-of-mine (ROM) pad situated on the edge of the pit, where it will be crushed in a mobile primary jaw crusher. The waste rock will be trucked to the waste rock dumps. The crushed ore will be stockpiled before being sent to the on-site processing facility, where it undergoes magnetic separation for the production of iron ore concentrates. The concentrates will be stockpiled before being trucked to the Burnie Port for shipping. The tailings slurry from the processing plant will be fed to a tailings storage facility through a 3km-long tailing pipeline. An estimated 13.9Mt of tailings will be generated over the mine life. Production from Rogetta iron ore mine The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

Rogetta iron ore mine is estimated contain 25.9Mt of iron ore resources grading 31.06% Fe. The resource estimate includes 11.6Mt of measured and 13.9Mt of indicated iron ore resources, at cut-off grades of 31.98% and 30.25%, respectively. Mining and processing at Rogetta iron ore project Rogetta will be an open-pit mine involving drill-blast-haul operations. The mining fleet will comprise a dozer, an excavator, four rigid dump trucks for mining operations up to 60m below ground, and five articulated dump trucks for mining operations at depths beyond 60m below ground. The mine pit will be dewatered with the help of dewatering bores or in-pit sumps. The extracted ore will be hauled to the run-of-mine (ROM) pad situated on the edge of the pit, where it will be crushed in a mobile primary jaw crusher. The waste rock will be trucked to the waste rock dumps. The crushed ore will be stockpiled before being sent to the on-site processing facility, where it undergoes magnetic separation for the production of iron ore concentrates. The concentrates will be stockpiled before being trucked to the Burnie Port for shipping. The tailings slurry from the processing plant will be fed to a tailings storage facility through a 3km-long tailing pipeline. An estimated 13.9Mt of tailings will be generated over the mine life. Production from Rogetta iron ore mine The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

Rogetta will be an open-pit mine involving drill-blast-haul operations. The mining fleet will comprise a dozer, an excavator, four rigid dump trucks for mining operations up to 60m below ground, and five articulated dump trucks for mining operations at depths beyond 60m below ground. The mine pit will be dewatered with the help of dewatering bores or in-pit sumps. The extracted ore will be hauled to the run-of-mine (ROM) pad situated on the edge of the pit, where it will be crushed in a mobile primary jaw crusher. The waste rock will be trucked to the waste rock dumps. The crushed ore will be stockpiled before being sent to the on-site processing facility, where it undergoes magnetic separation for the production of iron ore concentrates. The concentrates will be stockpiled before being trucked to the Burnie Port for shipping. The tailings slurry from the processing plant will be fed to a tailings storage facility through a 3km-long tailing pipeline. An estimated 13.9Mt of tailings will be generated over the mine life. Production from Rogetta iron ore mine The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

The mine pit will be dewatered with the help of dewatering bores or in-pit sumps. The extracted ore will be hauled to the run-of-mine (ROM) pad situated on the edge of the pit, where it will be crushed in a mobile primary jaw crusher. The waste rock will be trucked to the waste rock dumps. The crushed ore will be stockpiled before being sent to the on-site processing facility, where it undergoes magnetic separation for the production of iron ore concentrates. The concentrates will be stockpiled before being trucked to the Burnie Port for shipping. The tailings slurry from the processing plant will be fed to a tailings storage facility through a 3km-long tailing pipeline. An estimated 13.9Mt of tailings will be generated over the mine life. Production from Rogetta iron ore mine The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

The extracted ore will be hauled to the run-of-mine (ROM) pad situated on the edge of the pit, where it will be crushed in a mobile primary jaw crusher. The waste rock will be trucked to the waste rock dumps. The crushed ore will be stockpiled before being sent to the on-site processing facility, where it undergoes magnetic separation for the production of iron ore concentrates. The concentrates will be stockpiled before being trucked to the Burnie Port for shipping. The tailings slurry from the processing plant will be fed to a tailings storage facility through a 3km-long tailing pipeline. An estimated 13.9Mt of tailings will be generated over the mine life. Production from Rogetta iron ore mine The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

The crushed ore will be stockpiled before being sent to the on-site processing facility, where it undergoes magnetic separation for the production of iron ore concentrates. The concentrates will be stockpiled before being trucked to the Burnie Port for shipping. The tailings slurry from the processing plant will be fed to a tailings storage facility through a 3km-long tailing pipeline. An estimated 13.9Mt of tailings will be generated over the mine life. Production from Rogetta iron ore mine The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

The concentrates will be stockpiled before being trucked to the Burnie Port for shipping. The tailings slurry from the processing plant will be fed to a tailings storage facility through a 3km-long tailing pipeline. An estimated 13.9Mt of tailings will be generated over the mine life. Production from Rogetta iron ore mine The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

The tailings slurry from the processing plant will be fed to a tailings storage facility through a 3km-long tailing pipeline. An estimated 13.9Mt of tailings will be generated over the mine life. Production from Rogetta iron ore mine The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

The project is forecasted to extract 19.3Mt of iron ore to produce 5.5Mt of concentrates over eight years of mine life, with peak production planned from second to sixth year of mining. The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

The average mining capacity of the project will be 6,600t of ore per day (tpd), while the peak capacity is expected to be 9,800tpd. Infrastructure facilities for Rogetta iron ore project The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

The mine site will be accessed from the Ridgley Highway via Upper Natone Road and Rogetta Road. The Rogetta Road will be upgraded from Upper Natone Road junction to the processing facility with new 3.5m-wide travel lanes. Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

Water will be sourced from the nearby Blythe River, while rainwater harvesting is also proposed to meet the water requirement during dry seasons. The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

The mine is estimated require up to 10.5MW of electricity, which is planned to be supplied through a 22kV underground transmission line connecting the Hampshire substation. The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

The tailings storage facility, to be located 3km south of the open-pit, will occupy a surface area of 50ha and have crest height of 32m. Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

Two waste rock dumps (WRD) are proposed for the project - the 25ha Western WRD, which will be used as the main dump, and the smaller Northern WRD, which will be used to store potentially acid-forming material. Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

Other infrastructure facilities for the project include an administrative building, a workshop, a small packaged sewage treatment facility, and a water treatment facility.

mining

We are the world's largest producer of iron ore and nickel, and we also operate in other mineral areas. With investments in technology and logistics, we guarantee the efficiency, growth, and sustainability of our operations.

We are the world's largest producer of iron ore and nickel, and we also operate in other mineral areas. With investments in technology and logistics, we guarantee the efficiency, growth, and sustainability of our operations.

Iron ore, an essential raw material for the manufacture of steel, is found in nature in rocks mixed with other elements. Through several cutting-edge industrial processes, the ore is processed to be sold to the steel industries. The iron ore produced by Vale can be found in the construction of houses, manufacture of cars, and production of household appliances.

Hard and malleable, nickel resists corrosion and maintains its physical and mechanical properties even under extreme temperatures. The high-grade nickel produced by Vale is greatly sought after for electroplating and battery applications.

Manganese, the fourth most used metal in the world, is an element of the composition of several items used in our daily lives, such as batteries, pots, and paint. The mineral is also essential for the manufacture of steel and ferroalloys, which are combinations of iron with one or more chemical elements.

Metallurgical coal is used in the manufacture of steel and is the focus of our operations and projects. And thermal coal, also produced by our operations, is used to generate heat and energy in thermal power plants.

Copper is one of the most important metals for the modern industry and, therefore, one of the businesses in which Vale operates. Its thermal energy conductive property surpasses that of any other commercially exploited metal. Malleable, recyclable, and resistant to corrosion and high temperatures, copper is used in the generation and transmission of energy, in wiring and almost all electronic equipment such as TVs and mobile phones.

rising nickel prices to support project development report

In its latest industry report, Fitch Solutions forecasts nickel mine production to grow by 8.3% y-o-y in 2021, above the average growth of 5.9% y-o-y experienced over 2010-2019 but not fully replacing the 23.3% expected contraction in 2020s nickel output.

Growth in the near term will be driven by a recovery in output in the Philippines and Indonesia, Fitch says. In the Philippines, lockdowns and supply chain constraints over the first half of 2020 had reduced output by 27.7%.

Fitch expects this low base effect to thus support growth. In Indonesia, the maintaining of nickel ore export ban had significantly hampered domestic opportunities for miners to sell their product, leading to a decline in production. Fitch expects mineral production to pick up in Indonesia as the country ramps up its nickel smelting and refining capacity. Fitch notes upside risk to its nickel mining growth forecasts depending on how quickly Indonesia will be able to ramp up its downstream capacity.

In the longer term, Fitch forecasts global nickel mine production to grow by an annual average rate of 3.7% y-o-y over 2021-2029, a significant slowdown from the 5.9% y-o-y average achieved over 2010-2019, which was boosted by higher nickel prices at the time and strong Indonesian output before another export ban in 2014.

By 2029, Fitch expects global annual nickel production to reach 2.7mnt, up from 2.0mnt in 2020. Indonesia surpassed the Philippines as the largest global producer in 2017 following the introduction of stringent environmental regulations in the latter.

But Fitch believes the tables will turn in 2020 onwards as the Philippines is set to regain its spot as the largest global producer due to a restriction on nickel ore exports in Indonesia leading to a halt to mining operations. The other best-performing major producer will be Australia, which maintains a stable regulatory environment and solid project pipeline. Finally, Russian nickel production will grow at the slowest rate of the top five major producing countries in the coming years as few new projects come online.

Australian nickel production growth will also remain positive over the coming years, due to a healthy project pipeline. Its nickel sector will increasingly gain investor attention as the rising battery trend prompts miners to develop projects in stable operating environments. A more positive price outlook for nickel, underpinned by solid demand growth, will support this view.