mining industry systems

new to mining? here are the most common types of mining equipment

Working in the mining industry can be a dangerous place if you dont know what youre doing. Regular training is essential and understanding the machines youre working near or operating plays an important role in all aspects of the industry.

Each type of mining equipment comes with its own set of mining activities. The most common types of mining equipment vary depending whether the work is being carried out above or below ground or mining for gold, metals, coal or crude oil. From drilling machines to excavators, crushing and grinding equipment the mining industry comes complete with all the right tools. New to the job and want to find out what it all means? Heres a few of the industrys most common types of equipment and why theyre important for the job.

Probably one of the most common pieces of mining equipment, drills are an important part of the underground mining operation. Underground mining is carried out when rocks or minerals are located at a fair distance beneath the ground. But then they need to be brought to the surface. Underground specialized mining equipment such as trucks, loaders, diggers etc. are used to excavate the material and are normally hauled to the surface with skips or lifts for further processing. Drilling is normally required to place explosive charges to liberate the minerals from the overburden material. Underground mining techniques have progressed significantly over the past years, including using remote controlled machinery.

Drills assist in creating holes descending underground. If miners are required to work underground, drills can also be used in ensuring the holes are large enough to serve as a portal for miners to enter. Directional drilling is also a type of mining technology where miners will use the tools and certain methods to drill wells.

Blasting tools are an essential part of the mining industry and are used to break down and fracture materials (usually rocks) by use of a calculated amount of explosive to liberate the sought-after product from the waste material. Blasting is also used to remove pockets of unwanted material that are preventing mining machines and personnel to get to the seam containing the materials of interest. Unmanned drill rigs will drill holes at pre-determined depths and positions on a blast face to ensure that a particular size fraction is achieved and that little of the overburden is liberated with the blasting to reduce material handling costs. Once this process has been completed, an excavator is used to recover the blasted rocks and other debris that has been dislodged during the blasting. The material is then conveyed to a central conveying system which will take it directly to the surface or via a skip and hoist system.

For above ground mining, earth movers are utilised regularly to carry loose soil and earth from one location to another. Earth movers play an important role in the mining industry because the equipment is specifically designed to work on large earth-moving and mining projects for a faster and more practical process. Used for digging, pushing and transporting the earth, they require the specialised skills of an operator.

Earth movers are heavy mining equipment that the industry would struggle to survive without and work hand in hand with bulldozers. Earth movers are normally used for removing overburden or waste material, which enables the excavators to remove the material or mineral of interest. Bulldozers are used to move this overburden material around to create a working surface for other equipment such as haul trucks and excavators.

As its name suggests, crushing equipment is used to crush rock and stone. Designed to achieve maximum productivity and high reduction rate, mining crushing equipment can come in a variety of different types for a range of jobs.

Crushing equipment is specially configured to break down the hard rock matter or gravel to a manageable size for transportation or conveying. They are valuable pieces of equipment in the industry because they reduce the costs associated with handling of larger sized material and also ensure efficient liberation of elements of interest in downstream processing of the material. In an opencast or strip mining operation, the run of mine (ROM) material is normally transported to the primary crusher by haul trucks, and in underground mining operations it is conveyed to the primary crusher. Crushing equipment is important to the mining process because it reduces the use of precious excavated resources and eliminates the amount of material on site.

Once the excavator transporter brings the raw material to the crusher for processing, the feeding device feeds the material into the crusher and in return the material is screened and all oversized material is recirculated back to the crusher to ensure correct size fraction is obtained. This weighbelt feeding equipment, usually referred to as Weighfeeders, conveys and controls the feedrate into the crusher to improve crusher efficiency.

Feeding and conveying equipment are necessary to the mining industry to move and control material flow within a mining and processing operation to facilitate efficient operation of equipment and determine operating rates and yields. In some instances secondary crushing is required prior to processing of the material. Once the material is at the correct size, fraction processing can occur which could include, milling, flotation, leaching etc.

Belt scale systems let you monitor production output and inventory, or regulate product loadout, while providing vital information for the effective management and efficient operation of your business. There are elemental crossbelt analyzers that provide real-time quality analysis of critical process streams to facilitate sorting, blending and out-of-seam dilution control. While materials are on the troughed belt conveyor, an automatic sampling system (which could be single or multi-stage) can take a representative sample directly from the moving material stream. (Take a look at this video to see how a sampling system works.) Weighbelt Feeders that convey and control feedrate accurately and reliably can reduce material consumption, help maintain blend consistency, and increase profits.

Flow measurement systems provide continuous, real-time flow measurement of free-falling materials or dense phase, pneumatically conveyed bulk solids, which is important to ensure and maintain product quality and process efficiency.

This article was co-written by Jayde Ferguson, who writes for Direct Mining a leading supplier of premier mining equipment, products and services throughout Australia and the Asia Pacific region. Stephan Nel, Global Product/Applications Manager for Coal & Sinter at Thermo Fisher Scientific, co-wrote and edited the piece as well.

Need a Belt scale system for your bulk material handling? To help you decide which belt scale system is best for your mining operation, weve outlined the options in an easy-to-read belt scale system selection guide so you can decide which belt scale system is right for you. Click on the image, take a look at the chart, and see if it helps you decide.

You make a great point about how drills are a very common piece of mining equipment. Choosing the right kind of drill tip can make a big difference in efficiency. Many drill bits will be tipped with synthetic diamonds to ensure that they are as durable as possible regardless of the rock and substrate involved. Thanks for your post.

It is true that working in the mining industry can be a dangerous place if we dont know about the machinery that are useful in mining industry. I hope your post will help people to know about the most common types of mining equipment and how to use them properly. Thanks

Thanks for the information. This really help to understand the different types of equipment you can expect to see in a mine. Drilling is such an important part to the mining process. Drilling and blasting go hand in hand to help break up the hard ground. After all you can gather the material your mining if you cant get to it.

Understating what type of mining equipment like core boxes, seems like a good place to start for beginners. Theres really now way to do a job properly unless youre familiar with the tools and equipment youll be using. It might also help with improving safety.

I AM ABOUT GOING IN TO MINING BUSINESS , ON MY RESEARCH ON HOW IT IS DONE BROUGHT ME TO THIS ARTICLE KUDOS TO Author Bios FOR THIS WONDERFUL HELP I GOT THROUGH UR POST AM GRATEFUL AND I NEED MORE GUIDE LINE TOWARD STONE MINING I AM CHIDI YOUNG

Good luck to you Chidi. Feel free to visit our Cement/Coal/Minerals Learning Center on our website for educational information, white papers, application notes, ebooks, infographics, etc. https://www.thermofisher.com/us/en/home/industrial/cement-coal-minerals/cement-coal-minerals-learning-center.html

I like how you mentioned that drills are needed in the mining industry because these are going to be used in creating holes descending underground. Its also intriguing to learn that the blasting tools are mainly used to break down and fracture the materials. Well, if I had a mining company, I would make sure to place industrial fans in there because these will provide air stream.

the scourge of the mining industry - solomon times online

With windfall gains from the forestry sector these investors are now carving up resource rich lands throughout the country. Their modes operandi remain the same, deals are cut from up top, with the actual resource owners becoming mere spectators.

The track record of these mining companies is very poor very little in terms of monetary gains go back to the people and government. Economically speaking, the mining industry is probably the only saving grace for the Solomon Islands in the foreseeable future. With a growing population the pressure that comes with it in terms of government services will only increase in time to come.

Regrettably, recent history in this sector suggests that competency, reputation, financial and technical capacity which are key prerequisite considerations for eligibility now appear lacking in decision making relating to the granting of mineral rights, Wale says.

The current problems are just tarnishing Solomon Islands reputation as an attractive investment destination for reputable companies leaving us at the mercy of opportunist operators hell bent on serving their own selfish interests.

A draft national minerals policy was developed in 2017, this resulted in drafting instructions in mid-2018 which formed the basis of an initial mining bill prepared under guidance of the Office of the Attorney-General.

evidence of the impacts of metal mining and the effectiveness of mining mitigation measures on socialecological systems in arctic and boreal regions: a systematic map protocol | environmental evidence | full text

Mining activities, including prospecting, exploration, construction, operation, maintenance, expansion, abandonment, decommissioning and repurposing of a mine can impact social and environmental systems in a range of positive and negative, and direct and indirect ways. Mining can yield a range of benefits to societies, but it may also cause conflict, not least in relation to above-ground and sub-surface land use. Similarly, mining can alter environments, but remediation and mitigation can restore systems. Boreal and Arctic regions are sensitive to impacts from development, both on social and environmental systems. Native ecosystems and aboriginal human communities are typically affected by multiple stressors, including climate change and pollution, for example.

We will search a suite of bibliographic databases, online search engines and organisational websites for relevant research literature using a tested search strategy. We will also make a call for evidence to stakeholders that have been identified in the wider 3MK project (https://osf.io/cvh3u/). We will screen identified and retrieved articles at two distinct stages (title and abstract, and full text) according to a predetermined set of inclusion criteria, with consistency checks at each level to ensure criteria can be made operational. We will then extract detailed information relating to causal linkages between actions or impacts and measured outcomes, along with descriptive information about the articles and studies and enter data into an interactive systematic map database. We will visualise this database on an Evidence Atlas (an interactive, cartographic map) and identify knowledge gaps and clusters using Heat Maps (cross-tabulations of important variables, such as mineral type and studied impacts). We will identify good research practices that may support researchers in selecting the best study designs where these are clear in the evidence base.

Mining activities, including prospecting, exploration, construction, operation, maintenance, expansion, abandonment, decommissioning and repurposing of a mine can impact social and environmental systems in a range of positive and negative, and direct and indirect ways. Mine exploration, construction, operation, and maintenance may result in land-use change, and may have associated negative impacts on environments, including deforestation, erosion, contamination and alteration of soil profiles, contamination of local streams and wetlands, and an increase in noise level, dust and emissions (e.g. [1,2,3,4,5]). Mine abandonment, decommissioning and repurposing may also result in similar significant environmental impacts, such as soil and water contamination [6,7,8]. Beyond the mines themselves, infrastructure built to support mining activities, such as roads, ports, railway tracks, and power lines, can affect migratory routes of animals and increase habitat fragmentation [9, 10].

Mining can also have positive and negative impacts on humans and societies. Negative impacts include those on human health (e.g. [11]) and living standards [12], for example. Mining is also known to affect traditional practices of Indigenous peoples living in nearby communities [13], and conflicts in land use are also often present, as are other social impacts including those related to public health and human wellbeing (e.g. [14,15,16,17]. In terms of positive impacts, mining is often a source of local employment and may contribute to local and regional economies [18, 19]. Remediation of the potential environmental impacts, for example through water treatment and ecological restoration, can have positive net effects on environmental systems [20]. Mine abandonment, decommissioning and repurposing can also have both positive and negative social impacts. Examples of negative impacts include loss of jobs and local identities [21], while positive impact can include opportunities for new economic activities [22], e.g. in the repurposing of mines to become tourist attractions.

Mitigation measures (as described in the impact assessment literature) are implemented to avoid, eliminate, reduce, control or compensate for negative impacts and ameliorate impacted systems [23]. Such measures must be considered and outlined in environmental and social impact assessments (EIAs and SIAs) that are conducted prior to major activities such as resource extraction [24, 25]. Mitigation of negative environmental impacts in one system (e.g. water or soil) can influence other systems such as wellbeing of local communities and biodiversity in a positive or negative manner [23]. A wide range of technological engineering solutions have been implemented to treat contaminated waters (e.g. constructed wetlands [26], reactive barriers treating groundwater [27], conventional wastewater treatment plants). Phytoremediation of contaminated land is also an area of active research [28].

Mitigation measures designed to alleviate the negative impacts of mining on social and environmental systems may not always be effective, particularly in the long-term and across systems, e.g. a mitigation designed to affect an environmental change may have knock on changes in a social system. Indeed, the measures may have unintentional adverse impacts on environments and societies. To date, little research appears to have been conducted into mitigation measure effectiveness, and we were unable to find any synthesis or overview of the systems-level effectiveness of metal mining mitigation measures.

Boreal and Arctic regions are sensitive to impacts from mining and mining-related activities [29, 30], both on social and environmental systems: these northern latitudes are often considered harsh and thus challenging for human activities and industrial development. However, the Arctic is home to substantial mineral resources [31, 32] and has been in focus for mining activities for several 100years, with a marked increase in the early 20th century and intensifying interest in exploration and exploitation in recent years to meet a growing global demand for metals(Fig. 1). Given the regions geological features and societys need for metals, resource extraction is likely to dominate discourse on development of northern latitudes in the near future. As of 2015, there were some 373 mineral mines across Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Iceland, The Faroes, Norway (including Svalbard), Sweden, Finland and Russia (see Table1), with the top five minerals being gold, iron, copper, nickel and zinc [33].

Many topics relating to mining and its impacts on environmental and social systems are underrepresented in the literature as illustrated by the following example. The Sami people are a group of traditional people inhabiting a region spanning northern Norway, Sweden, Finland and Russia. Sami people are affected by a range of external pressures, one of which pertains to resource extraction and land rights, particularly in relation to nomadic reindeer herding. However, there is almost no published research on the topic [34].

The literature on the environmental and social impacts of mining has grown in recent years, but despite its clear importance, there has been little synthesis of research knowledge pertaining to the social and environmental impacts of metal mining in Arctic and boreal regions. The absence of a consolidated knowledge base on the impacts of mining and the effectiveness of mitigation measures in Arctic and boreal regions is a significant knowledge gap in the face of the continued promotion of extractive industries. There is thus an urgent need for approaches that can transparently and legitimately gather research evidence on the potential environmental and social impacts of mining and the impacts of associated mitigation measures in a rigorous manner.

This systematic map forms a key task within a broader knowledge synthesis project called 3MK (Mapping the impacts of Mining using Multiple Knowledges, https://osf.io/cvh3u/). The stakeholder group for this map includes representatives of organisations affected by the broader 3MK project knowledge mapping project or who have special interests in the project outcome. We define stakeholders here as all individuals or organisations that might be affected by the systematic map work or its findings [35, 36], and thus broadly includes researchers and the Working and Advisory Group for this project.

Invitations to be included in this group were based on an initial stakeholder mapping process and soliciting expressions of interest (see Stakeholder Engagement Methodology Document, https://osf.io/cvh3u/). This group included government ministries and agencies such as the Ministry of Enterprise and Innovation, the Mineral Inspectorate (Bergstaten) and County Administrative Boards, the mining industries branch organisation (Svemin) and individual companies such as LKAB Minerals and Boliden AB, Sami organisations, including the Sami Parliament, related research projects, and representatives of international assessment processes, such as activities within the Arctic Council. Stakeholders were invited to a specific meeting (held at Stockholm Environment Institute in September 2018) to help refine the scope, define the key elements of the review question, finalise a search strategy, and suggest sources of evidence, and also to subsequently provide comments on the structure of the protocol .

The broader 3MK project aims to develop a multiple evidence base methodology [37] combining systematic review approaches with documentation of Indigenous and local knowledge and to apply this approach in a study of the impacts of metal mining and impacts of mitigation measures. This systematic map aims to answer the question:

The review question has the following key elements: Population: : Social, technological (i.e. industrial contexts, heavily altered environments, etc.) and environmental systems in circumpolar Arctic and boreal regions. Intervention/exposure: : Impacts (direct and indirect, positive and negative) associated with metal mining (for gold, iron, copper, nickel, zinc, silver, molybdenum and lead) or its mitigation measures. We focus on these metals as they represent approximately 88% of Arctic and boreal mines (according to relevant country operating mine data from 2015, [33]), and contains the top 5 minerals extracted in the region (gold, iron, copper, nickel and zinc). Furthermore, these minerals include all metals mined within Sweden, the scope of a related workstream within the broader 3MK project (https://osf.io/cvh3u/). Comparator: : For quantitative research; the absence of metal mining or metal mining mitigation measureseither prior to an activity or in an independent, controlled location lacking such impacts. Additionally, alternative mining systems is a suitable comparator. For qualitative research; comparators are typically implicit, if present and will thus not be required. Outcome: : Any and all outcomes observed in social and environmental systems described in the literature will be iteratively identified and catalogued. Data type: : Both quantitative and qualitative research will be included.

Impacts (direct and indirect, positive and negative) associated with metal mining (for gold, iron, copper, nickel, zinc, silver, molybdenum and lead) or its mitigation measures. We focus on these metals as they represent approximately 88% of Arctic and boreal mines (according to relevant country operating mine data from 2015, [33]), and contains the top 5 minerals extracted in the region (gold, iron, copper, nickel and zinc). Furthermore, these minerals include all metals mined within Sweden, the scope of a related workstream within the broader 3MK project (https://osf.io/cvh3u/).

For quantitative research; the absence of metal mining or metal mining mitigation measureseither prior to an activity or in an independent, controlled location lacking such impacts. Additionally, alternative mining systems is a suitable comparator. For qualitative research; comparators are typically implicit, if present and will thus not be required.

The review will follow the Collaboration for Environmental Evidence Guidelines and Standards for Evidence Synthesis in Environmental Management [38] and it conforms to ROSES reporting standards [39] (see Additional file 1).

We will search bibliographic databases using a tested search string adapted to each database according to the necessary input syntax of each resource. The Boolean version of the search string that will be used in Web of Science Core Collections can be found in Additional file 2.

We will search across 17 bibliographic databases as show in Table2. Bibliographic database searches will be performed in English only, since these databases catalogue research using English titles and abstracts.

Searches for academic (i.e. file-drawer) and organisational grey literature (as defined by [40]) will be performed in Google Scholar, which has been shown to be effective in retrieving these types of grey literature [41]. The search strings used to search for literature in Google Scholar are described in detail in Additional file 3.

Search results will be exported from Google Scholar using Publish or Perish [42], which allows the first 1000 results to be exported. These records will be added to the bibliographic database search results prior to duplicate removal.

In order to identify organisational grey literature, we will search for relevant evidence across the suite of organisational websites listed in Table3. For each website, we will save the first 100 search results from each search string as PDF/HTML files and screening the results in situ, recording all relevant full texts for inclusion in the systematic map database. The search terms used will be based on the same terms used in the Google Scholar searches described above but will be adapted iteratively for each website depending on the relevance of the results obtained. In addition, we will hand search each website to locate and screen any articles found in publications or bibliography sections of the sites. All search activities will be recorded and described in the systematic map report.

Relevant reviews that are identified during screening will be reserved for assessment of potentially missed records. Once screening is complete (see below), we will screen the reference lists of these reviews and include relevant full texts in the systematic map database. We will also retain these relevant reviews in an additional systematic map database of review articles.

A set of 41 studies known to be relevant have been provided by the Advisory Team and Working Group (review team); the benchmark list (see Additional file 4). During scoping and development of the search string, the bibliographic database search results will be checked to ascertain whether any of these studies were not found. For any cases where articles on the benchmark list are missed by the draft search string, we will examine why these studies may have been missed and adapt the search string accordingly.

We will perform a search update immediately prior to completion of the systematic map database (i.e. once coding and meta-data is completed). The search strategy for bibliographic databases will be repeated using the same search string, restricting searches to the time period after the original searches were performed. New search results will be processed in the same way as original search results.

A subset of 10% of all titles and abstracts will be screened by two reviewers, with all disagreements discussed in detail. Refinements of the inclusion criteria will be made in liaison with the entire review team where necessary. A kappa test will be performed on the outputs of screening of this subset and where agreement is below k=0.6, a further 10% of records will be screened and tested. Only when a kappa score of greater than 0.6 is obtained will a single reviewer screen the remaining records. Consistency checking on a subset of 10% will be undertaken at full text screening in a similar manner, followed by discussion of all disagreements. A kappa test will be performed and consistency checking repeated on a second subset of 10% where agreements is below k=0.6. Consistency checking will be repeated until a score of greater than 0.6 is obtained.

The following inclusion criteria will be used to assess relevance of studies identified through searching. All inclusion criteria will be used at full text screening, but we believe that data type and comparator are unlikely to be useful at title and abstract screening, since this information is often not well-reported in titles or abstracts. Eligible population: : We will include social, technological and environmental systems in Arctic and boreal regions based on political boundaries as follows (this encompasses various definitions of boreal zones, rather than any one specific definition for comprehensiveness and ease of understanding): Canada, USA (Alaska), Greenland, Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Norway (including Svalbard), Sweden, Finland, and Russia. Eligible intervention/exposure: : We will include all impacts (positive, negative, direct and indirect) associated with any aspect of metal mining and its mitigation measures. We will include research pertaining to all stages of mining, from prospecting onwards as follows: prospecting, exploration, construction, operation, maintenance, expansion, abandonment, decommissioning, reopening and repurposing. Eligible mines will include those of gold, iron, copper, nickel, zinc, silver, molybdenum and lead. Eligible comparator: : For quantitative research; the absence of metal mining or metal mining mitigation measureseither prior to an activity or in an independent, controlled location lacking such impacts. For qualitative research; comparators are typically implicit, if present and will thus not be required. Eligible outcome: : Any and all outcomes (i.e. measured impacts) observed in social, technological and environmental systems will be included. Eligible data type: : We will include both quantitative and qualitative research. Eligible study type: : We will include both primary empirical research and secondary research (reviews will be catalogued in a separate database). Modelling studies and commentaries will not be included.

We will include social, technological and environmental systems in Arctic and boreal regions based on political boundaries as follows (this encompasses various definitions of boreal zones, rather than any one specific definition for comprehensiveness and ease of understanding): Canada, USA (Alaska), Greenland, Iceland, the Faroe Islands, Norway (including Svalbard), Sweden, Finland, and Russia.

We will include all impacts (positive, negative, direct and indirect) associated with any aspect of metal mining and its mitigation measures. We will include research pertaining to all stages of mining, from prospecting onwards as follows: prospecting, exploration, construction, operation, maintenance, expansion, abandonment, decommissioning, reopening and repurposing. Eligible mines will include those of gold, iron, copper, nickel, zinc, silver, molybdenum and lead.

For quantitative research; the absence of metal mining or metal mining mitigation measureseither prior to an activity or in an independent, controlled location lacking such impacts. For qualitative research; comparators are typically implicit, if present and will thus not be required.

Exclude, not relevant metal mining (intervention/exposure) [this category is related to the above intervention/exposure exclusion criteria but will only be selected where all other criteria are met, facilitating expansion of the map in the future].

We will attempt to retrieve full texts of relevant abstracts using Stockholm University and Carleton University library subscriptions. Where full texts cannot be readily retrieved this way (or via associated library inter-loan networks), we will make use of institutional access provided to our Advisory Team members, including: University College London, KTH, University of Lapland, and SLU. Where records still cannot be obtained, requests for articles will be sent to corresponding authors where email addresses are provided and/or requests for full texts will be made through ResearchGate.

None of the review team has authored or worked on research within this field prior to starting this project, but members of the Advisory Team and project Working Group will be prevented from providing advice or comments relating specifically to research papers to which they may have contributed.

We will extract and code a range of variables, outlined in Table4. All meta-data and coding will be included in a detailed systematic map database, with each line representing one study-location (i.e. each independent study conducted in each independent location).

Meta-data extraction and coding will be performed by multiple reviewers following consistency checking on an initial coding of subset of between 10 and 15 full texts, discussing all disagreements. The remaining full texts will then be coded. If resources allow we may contact authors by email with requests for missing information.

We will display the results of the systematic mapping using a ROSES flow diagram [44]. We will narratively synthesise the relevant evidence base in our systematic map using descriptive plots and tables showing the number of studies identified across the variables described above. For more complex data, we will use heat maps to display the volume of evidence across multiple variables (see Knowledge gap and cluster identification strategy, below).

We will use interactive heat maps (pivot charts) to display the volume of evidence across multiple dimensions of meta-data in order to identify knowledge gaps (sub-topics un- or under-represented by evidence) and knowledge clusters (sub-topics with sufficient evidence to allow full synthesis). Examples of meta-data variables that will be used together include (this is an indicative rather than exhaustive list):

Appleton J, Weeks J, Calvez J, Beinhoff C. Impacts of mercury contaminated mining waste on soil quality, crops, bivalves, and fish in the Naboc River area, Mindanao, Philippines. Sci Total Environ. 2006;354:198211.

Navarro M, Prez-Sirvent C, Martnez-Snchez M, Vidal J, Tovar P, Bech J. Abandoned mine sites as a source of contamination by heavy metals: a case study in a semi-arid zone. J Geochem Explor. 2008;96:18393.

Anttonen M, Kumpula J, Colpaert A. Range selection by semi-domesticated reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) in relation to infrastructure and human activity in the boreal forest environment, northern Finland. Arctic. 2011:114.

Hossain D, Gorman D, Chapelle B, Mann W, Saal R, Penton G. Impact of the mining industry on the mental health of landholders and rural communities in southwest Queensland. Aust Psychiatry. 2013;21:327.

Nakazawa K, Nagafuchi O, Kawakami T, Inoue T, Yokota K, Serikawa Y, Cyio B, Elvince R. Human health risk assessment of mercury vapor around artisanal small-scale gold mining area, Palu city, Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2016;124:15562.

Jain R, Cui Z, Domen J. Environmental impacts of mining. In: Jain R, Cui Z, Domen J, editors. Environmental impact of mining and mineral processing: management, monitoring, and auditing strategies. Amsterdam: Elsevier; 2016. p. 53157.

Keeling A, Sandlos J. Ghost towns and zombie mines: the historical dimensions of mine abandonment, reclamation, and redevelopment in the Canadian North. In: Bocking S, Martin B, editors. Ice Blink: Navigating Northern Environmental History; 2011. p. 377420.

Mahar A, Wang P, Ali A, Awasthi MK, Lahori AH, Wang Q, Li RH, Zhang ZQ. Challenges and opportunities in the phytoremediation of heavy metals contaminated soils: a review. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf. 2016;126:11121.

Bennett JR, Shaw JD, Terauds A, Smol JP, Aerts R, Bergstrom DM, Blais JM, Cheung WW, Chown SL, Lea M-A. Polar lessons learned: long-term management based on shared threats in Arctic and Antarctic environments. Front Ecol Environ. 2015;13:31624.

Buixad Farr A, Stephenson SR, Chen L, Czub M, Dai Y, Demchev D, Efimov Y, Graczyk P, Grythe H, Keil K. Commercial Arctic shipping through the Northeast Passage: routes, resources, governance, technology, and infrastructure. Polar Geogr. 2014;37:298324.

Haddaway NR, Kohl C, da Silva NR, Schiemann J, Spk A, Stewart R, Sweet JB, Wilhelm R. A framework for stakeholder engagement during systematic reviews and maps in environmental management. Environ Evid. 2017;6:11.

Collaboration for Environmental Evidence. 2018. Guidelines and Standards for Evidence synthesis in Environmental Management. Version 5.0 (AS Pullin, GK Frampton, B Livoreil & G Petrokofsky, Eds). http://www.environmentalevidence.org/information-for-authors. Accessed 6 June 2018.

Haddaway NR, Macura B, Whaley P, Pullin AS. ROSES RepOrting standards for Systematic Evidence Syntheses: pro forma, flow-diagram and descriptive summary of the plan and conduct of environmental systematic reviews and systematic maps. Environ Evid. 2018;7:7.

We thank the project Advisory Team for comments on the project and the draft: the team consisted of Dag Avango, Steven Cooke, Sif Johansson, Rebecca Lawrence, Pamela Lesser, Bjrn hlander, Kaisa Raito, Rebecca Rees, and Maria Teng. We also thank the 3MK stakeholder group for valuable input. We also thank Mistra EviEM for co-funding the first Advisory Group meeting and publication fees for the systematic map.

Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Haddaway, N.R., Cooke, S.J., Lesser, P. et al. Evidence of the impacts of metal mining and the effectiveness of mining mitigation measures on socialecological systems in Arctic and boreal regions: a systematic map protocol. Environ Evid 8, 9 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13750-019-0152-8

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introducing climate-smart mining on the road to industry 4.0

Reducing our carbon footprint to mitigate the impact of climate change, as outlined in international treaties like the Paris Agreement and accelerating the journey to the all-electric mine, is a business priority for many mining companies and their customers.

There are three major trends fundamentally transforming the mining industry into what can be termed climate-smart mining. Firstly, there is the shift from diesel to electrification as a main power source. Secondly, digitalisation not only increases productivity, but allows for ease of maintenance. Thirdly, customers can reduce their total cost of ownership by standardising on high-efficiency motors and drives. This means that assets are deployed optimally in a sustainable manner that reduces the overall environmental impact.

Of course, it is not exactly certain how all of these trends are likely to play out over the next five to 15 years. What we do know, however, is that the future is invariably shaped by the innovations of today, which are transformed into the advances of tomorrow. Every company that operates in or serves the mining sector can participate in shaping this future and can begin to have an immediate impact. Let us all join forces as we co-develop and collaborate to set these new smart standards for mining.

The switch to remote services accelerated in 2020 due to the Covid-19 pandemic. This also resulted in a more rapid uptake of Industry 4.0 solutions in the mining industry in terms of automating operations for optimised productivity, reducing equipment downtime and costs, carrying out predictive rather than preventative maintenance and enhancing safety for mine personnel so as to introduce a zero harm culture.

Connected mines will result in a wealth of digitalised data from equipment, assets and applications. By the time this data reaches operators, it will already have been analysed and can be accessed easily and interacted with on any number of smart devices. Such a connected process results in rapid, smart and informed decision-making that will have a major impact on the bottom line.

Mining is one of the key industries where our drives, motors, generators, mechanical power transmission products and integrated digital powertrain solutions stand to play a major role in ushering in this new connected era. It is an example of the leading role we as a global innovator play in transforming both society and industry to achieve a more productive and sustainable future for all.

Assisting major South African industries such as mining to adopt the latest technology on the countrys path towards energy efficiency, reduced emissions and, ultimately, carbon neutrality is my main goal in my new position. This has been an important focus for me throughout my career in Spain and Mexico. As we all know, South Africa faces power constraints, coupled with lagging economic growth and development. Here I also see electrification and automation and power and water as critical business development areas for us as a business.

In Mexico, for example, a career highlight for me was overseeing the establishment of a new energy business unit that merged power and water to focus on the oil and gas industry. This is a sector where we enjoy a global footprint, with clients as far afield as Europe and the US. It is a burgeoning sector in Africa, especially with the latest oil and gas discoveries, presenting tremendous opportunities throughout the continent.

As a business, we succeed by adding value, which is a combination of our innovation, expertise and experience. Dealing with customer requirements is much more than offering technical solutions, but depends on understanding a customers business and how best to optimise it. Our customers are our true assets, because if we help them to succeed, then we succeed in turn. But it goes even further, as we have both a commitment and a drive to make the South African mining industry succeed and benchmark itself against the best in the world.

My plan is to maintain a strong foothold in South Africa, while continuing to expand into the rest of the continent, where mining especially is an important driver for growth and socioeconomic development. The mining industry has always demanded the latest technology and our solutions have been tried-and-tested in major markets such as North America and Europe.

As our recent White Paper entitled Achieving the Paris Agreement: The vital role of high-efficiency motors and drives in reducing energy consumption states, the technology to dramatically improve energy efficiency is available right now. For example, high-efficiency motors and drives are well established and time-tested. I aim to increase the uptake of such technology especially in mining as well as to educate the market about the importance of our long-term sustainability goals as a future-orientated business.

Of course, the benefits of greater energy efficiency go well beyond the fight against climate change. They contribute broadly to environmental conservation, cleaner air and water, better public health, energy independence and stronger economic growth and development. Nowhere is this more critically important than in the South African mining industry, which is taking significant strides towards a climate-smart future

About the author:Eduardo Aparicio has worked at Power Systems and Industrial Automation in Spain and was Local Business Line Manager for Energy Industries in Mexico. He holds a Mechanical Engineering degree from Universidad UCLM in Spain and an MBA from IMF Business School and Universidad Nebrija, Madrid.

mining industry - introduction to mining financial concepts

The mining industry is involved in the extraction of precious minerals and other geological materials. The extracted materials are transformed into a mineralized form that serves an economic benefit to the prospector or miner. Typical activities in the mining industry include metals production, metals investing, and metals trading.

Mining assetsTypes of AssetsCommon types of assets include current, non-current, physical, intangible, operating, and non-operating. Correctly identifying and can be divided into two main categories: projects and operating mines.

The purpose of exploration is to find ores that are economically viable to mine. It begins with locating mineral anomalies, after which discovering and sampling confirms or denies that there is a find. It can be further proven through drilling programs and resource definition.

Once a potential mine is proven to be viable, the planning and construction phase begins with applying for and obtaining permits, continuing economic studies, and refining mine plans. Infrastructure development also takes place at this stage as mines are often located in remote areas that require construction of roads and electricity.

Once the operation is ready to begin, the asset officially becomes an operating mine. During this phase, the ore is extracted, processed, and refined to produce metal. This section forms the bulk of the focus of the financial model for an operating mine. Once all the ore has been extracted, the mine closure process begins, which can last for several years. The process includes clean-up, reclamation, and environmental monitoring.

A mining companys main assets are its reserves and resources, which are the ores that contain economic materials that are viable to mine. It is important to be able to read a reserve and resource statement and understand what information needs to be pulled from it to make the financial model. The table below contains information used to produce the annual cash flow that we build up in the financial model.

If you look at the table from right to left, you are moving in increasing geologic certainty, meaning that geologists are becoming more confident about the amount of material that is contained in the ground. Moving from the bottom to top, you are increasing the economic viability, meaning that the ore at the top is more economically attractive to mine than the ore at the bottom.

In conclusion, the inferred resource is the least geologically certain and the least economically viable to mine, while the proven resource is the most geologically certain and the most economically viable to mine.

As we build a financial model, it is important to think about which part of the table we are pulling information from. We should risk-adjust the different components of the table to reflect the risks associated with them. Typically, an inferred resource will be excluded from the economic model due to the high degree of uncertainty associated with it.

CFI is the official provider of the global Financial Modeling & Valuation Analyst (FMVA)Become a Certified Financial Modeling & Valuation Analyst (FMVA)CFI's Financial Modeling and Valuation Analyst (FMVA) certification will help you gain the confidence you need in your finance career. Enroll today! certification program, designed to help anyone become a world-class financial analyst. To keep advancing your career, the additional resources below will be useful:

Get certified as a financial analyst with CFIs FMVA ProgramBecome a Certified Financial Modeling & Valuation Analyst (FMVA)CFI's Financial Modeling and Valuation Analyst (FMVA) certification will help you gain the confidence you need in your finance career. Enroll today!.

mining industry | market-specific solutions | siemens global

As a trusted mining partner,SIMINE solutionshelp customers to meet their challenges and thereby enable to set new benchmarks within the mining industry. To boost efficiency and reduce costs, we rely on our solutions for mine hoists, bulk material handling, gearless and conventional mills as well as mining-specific automation and power solutions.SIMINE solutions additionally offer solutions for the digitalization of your plants, machinery and processes which optimize operations and ensure consistent, end-to-end data management.

Competitiveness is mainly based on productivity and operational excellence. Modern technology offers new possibilities. The intelligent use of process data can help improve asset utilization, logistics, and maintenance, contributing to reaching an overall operational excellence.

Our SIMINE portfolio for continual mining extraction in open-cast mining ensures safe and reliable operations, while increasing productivity outputs and reducing the overall cost per ton extracted.

Our SIMINE bulk material handling solutions help you cover long distances and, simultaneously, increase your transported load and process speed while also saving energy and money along with providing a high level of safety.

Our gearless and pinion mill drives redefine operational reliability, availability, maintenance costs, and energy efficiency. In addition, we offer intelligent solutions such as condition monitoring for highest availability.

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best mining software 2021 | reviews of the most popular tools & systems

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nepsi - mining industry

Share this article: MINING Reactive Power and Large Filtering Solutions for the Global Mining Industry NEPSIs medium-voltage, metal-enclosed Products Meet the Challenges of the Mining Industry. Mining and metal processing plants focused on mineral ore concentration, electrowinning, and smelting require large reactive compensation and harmonic filtering systems to mitigate poor power factor and harmonics associated with large complex drive systems, power converters, and rectifier systems. NEPSIs harmonic filter systems have become industry standard where the mining environment presents unique challenges, where reliability, safety, and ease of operation and maintenance are of upmost importance. NEPSI harmonic filter systems, when compared to alternate technologies (open-air erector sets), offers lower risks to the EPC, a smaller footprint where space is often critical, and ease of engineering and procurement by way of NEPSIs specialized competencies and experience. Dont pay a higher price for your harmonic filter system; break it out of the GMD package. Come to NEPSI for project development, including: preliminary filter design and footprint drawings, budgetary quotes, and guide form specifications and specification development. - Rodrigo Dnner,International Sales and Marketing Manager Advanced Filter Solutions to Meet Your Grid Code Requirements Complex System, Simple Solution Amongst other harmonic producing loads in the processing plant and mine, SAG mills, BALL mills, and conveyors that utilize cycloconverters and other solid-state converter technologies stress the power system due to their low power factor and varying characteristic and non-characteristic speed dependent harmonic content. Meeting grid code requirements is a noteworthy challenge requiring reliable complex multi-tuned harmonic filter systems. Often due to the size of the mine load, or the remoteness of the mine, the mine operation depends on the availability and reliability of the harmonic filter system; A filter system outage can lead to a plant shutdown. With over 20 years in designing harmonic filter systems and a proven track record for mine processing plants, you can rely on NEPSI. Because of their advantages, metal-enclosed harmonic filter banks are now the preferred solution in the mining industry, being specified and recommended by most EPCs and EPCMs and validated by our end users. - Staff Engineer - Major EPC High Altitude Designs De-rate Your Equipment and Dont Forget to De-rate Your Labor Unfortunately, valuable resources including copper, gold, silver, iron ore, and many more are located in mountainous regions, often reaching altitudes over 4,000 meters. Supplying filters into a mine is already a challenge, but installing at high elevation, where the air is thin, adds another level of complexity, one that NEPSI has done, and done again, and again. NEPSIs products are de-rated for altitude and are the best choice when compared to other technologies, including open-air erector sets. Our products come with all switching, all protection, and all control. They arrive onsite completely assembled, tested, and ready for interconnection, minimizing site labor and labor costs (room, board, travel, living quarters) where you can only expect 60% output from your work force. When de-rating your electrical equipment, dont forget to de-rate your site labor (studies have shown labor output to drop off by near 40% at high altitude). By doing so, you will see the true value in NEPSIs solution. Space is Always at a Premium When it comes to harmonic filters, footprint impacts substation costs, and the smaller the better. Often thought of as plentiful in the mine environment, its not. With altitude, comes bedrock, hilly terrain, and a shortage of area for your substation. With the high cost of excavation, which sometimes includes blasting, a smaller footprint can recover significant costs on your project. NEPSIs harmonic filter systems have footprints that are 20% to 30% of the open-air erector-set alternative. If youre looking to minimize site work, risks, and uncertainty that accompanies excavation, specify metal-enclosed harmonic filter banks from NEPSI. See the difference for yourself! Simply hover over the image below for a real-world example of reducing your substation footprint. Harmonic Studies, Harmonic Filter Design, and Study Validation Detailed harmonic studies are most often performed by the GMD suppliers and consider many different plant operating scenarios, and supply contingencies. Filter design parameters are a key output of these studies. The study output, by no means is an equipment specification. NEPSI specializes in the development of filter systems from these studies and has been doing so for over 20 years. Not only do we develop a completely integrated harmonic filter package from these studies, we also validate the study by performing our own simulations with our industry recognized tools. In this way, you get a second set of eyes on the filter design and you can rest assured that the specified filter will meet your performance objectives. Typical Product Mix Voltage Rating: 24kV to 38kV Withstand Voltage: Up to 200 kV BIL, 100 kV 1-Min., factory testing of complete assemblies Reactive Power Rating: Scalable, 2 MVAR to 225 MVAR Number of Stages: 1 Stage to 8 Stages Stage Ratings: 2 MVAR to 20 MVAR Control: Local | Remote, Automatic, and by Plant DCS System Applicable Solutions Metal-Enclosed Power Capacitor Banks | Web Page Metal-Enclosed Power Capacitor Banks | PDF File Metal-Enclosed Harmonic Filter Banks | Web Page Metal-Enclosed Harmonic Filter Banks | PDF File RC Snubbers | Web Page RC Snubbers | PDF File Applicable Specifications Harmonic Filter Banks (No Feeder Bus) - Mining Spec. | MS Word Harmonic Filter Banks (No Feeder Bus) - Mining Spec. | PDF File Harmonic Filter Banks (With Feeder Bus) - Mining Spec. | MS Word Harmonic Filter Banks (With Feeder Bus) - Mining Spec. | PDF File RC Snubber - Guide Form Spec. | MS Word RC Snubber - Guide Form Spec. | PDF File Resources of Interest The Metal-Enclosed Advantage | PDF File Power capacitor banks and harmonic filter banks can be specified and purchased in two different configurations: Open-Rack or Metal-Enclosed. This technical note presents background information on these configuration options and provides compelling reasons why the metal-enclosed configuration is a better choice. An Alternative To Neutral Unbalance Protection | PDF File This technical note presents an alternate blown fuse detection scheme that utilizes direct fuse sensing. It cost less and provides better protection when compared to neutral-voltage and neutral current unbalance protection. Harmonic Filter Design | MS Excel Spreadsheet tool for calculating harmonic filter parameters. Filter types include: C-High-Pass (damped), Standard High-Pass, and Notch Tuned (Delta and Wye Connected) filters. Extra Content Around the Web Videos The Simplicity of Installing Metal-Enclosed Harmonic Filter Systems Harmonic Filter System Designed for Copper Concentrator Plants Arc Flash Hazard Mitigation (Embracing 0-HARM) Deep Dive Into Real World Harmonic Filters - Large 75 MVAR 5-Stage Filter System Destined for a Large Copper Concentrate Plant Technical Notes Altitude Derating of Metal Enclosed Harmonic Filter Banks Arc Flash Hazard Mitigation in Metal-Enclosed Power Capacitor Banks and Harmonic Filter Banks MTBF (Mean Time Between Failures) and MTTR (Mean Time to Repair) for NEPSIs Metal-Enclosed Solutions LinkedIn Posts Capacitor Banks and Harmonic Filter Banks for Underground Mining Applications Yes we are underground too! Factory Acceptance Tests (FAT) Successfully Completed on Metal-Enclosed Harmonic Filter System Destined for Large Copper Concentrate Plant NEPSI Continues to Grow In South America and Hires Rodrigo Dnner to Support Latin America Mining Industry NEPSI Breaks World Record! Heaviest Single-Stage Metal-Enclosed Harmonic Filter System Ever Shipped Youve seen the heaviest...now see the longest. Meet Bigfoot! HUGE Iron-core Filter Reactor! Large Single Stage C-HP Filter How many medium-voltage metal-enclosed reactive power solutions have we sold and where did they go? Calculators Altitude Correction for High Elevation Projects The Right Way to Do It per IEC and IEEE Standards References Partial Mining Experience for Large Harmonic Filter Systems

Mining and metal processing plants focused on mineral ore concentration, electrowinning, and smelting require large reactive compensation and harmonic filtering systems to mitigate poor power factor and harmonics associated with large complex drive systems, power converters, and rectifier systems. NEPSIs harmonic filter systems have become industry standard where the mining environment presents unique challenges, where reliability, safety, and ease of operation and maintenance are of upmost importance. NEPSI harmonic filter systems, when compared to alternate technologies (open-air erector sets), offers lower risks to the EPC, a smaller footprint where space is often critical, and ease of engineering and procurement by way of NEPSIs specialized competencies and experience.

Dont pay a higher price for your harmonic filter system; break it out of the GMD package. Come to NEPSI for project development, including: preliminary filter design and footprint drawings, budgetary quotes, and guide form specifications and specification development.

Amongst other harmonic producing loads in the processing plant and mine, SAG mills, BALL mills, and conveyors that utilize cycloconverters and other solid-state converter technologies stress the power system due to their low power factor and varying characteristic and non-characteristic speed dependent harmonic content. Meeting grid code requirements is a noteworthy challenge requiring reliable complex multi-tuned harmonic filter systems. Often due to the size of the mine load, or the remoteness of the mine, the mine operation depends on the availability and reliability of the harmonic filter system; A filter system outage can lead to a plant shutdown. With over 20 years in designing harmonic filter systems and a proven track record for mine processing plants, you can rely on NEPSI.

Because of their advantages, metal-enclosed harmonic filter banks are now the preferred solution in the mining industry, being specified and recommended by most EPCs and EPCMs and validated by our end users.

Unfortunately, valuable resources including copper, gold, silver, iron ore, and many more are located in mountainous regions, often reaching altitudes over 4,000 meters. Supplying filters into a mine is already a challenge, but installing at high elevation, where the air is thin, adds another level of complexity, one that NEPSI has done, and done again, and again. NEPSIs products are de-rated for altitude and are the best choice when compared to other technologies, including open-air erector sets. Our products come with all switching, all protection, and all control. They arrive onsite completely assembled, tested, and ready for interconnection, minimizing site labor and labor costs (room, board, travel, living quarters) where you can only expect 60% output from your work force. When de-rating your electrical equipment, dont forget to de-rate your site labor (studies have shown labor output to drop off by near 40% at high altitude). By doing so, you will see the true value in NEPSIs solution.

When it comes to harmonic filters, footprint impacts substation costs, and the smaller the better. Often thought of as plentiful in the mine environment, its not. With altitude, comes bedrock, hilly terrain, and a shortage of area for your substation. With the high cost of excavation, which sometimes includes blasting, a smaller footprint can recover significant costs on your project. NEPSIs harmonic filter systems have footprints that are 20% to 30% of the open-air erector-set alternative. If youre looking to minimize site work, risks, and uncertainty that accompanies excavation, specify metal-enclosed harmonic filter banks from NEPSI. See the difference for yourself! Simply hover over the image below for a real-world example of reducing your substation footprint.

Detailed harmonic studies are most often performed by the GMD suppliers and consider many different plant operating scenarios, and supply contingencies. Filter design parameters are a key output of these studies. The study output, by no means is an equipment specification. NEPSI specializes in the development of filter systems from these studies and has been doing so for over 20 years. Not only do we develop a completely integrated harmonic filter package from these studies, we also validate the study by performing our own simulations with our industry recognized tools. In this way, you get a second set of eyes on the filter design and you can rest assured that the specified filter will meet your performance objectives.

Metal-Enclosed Power Capacitor Banks | Web Page Metal-Enclosed Power Capacitor Banks | PDF File Metal-Enclosed Harmonic Filter Banks | Web Page Metal-Enclosed Harmonic Filter Banks | PDF File RC Snubbers | Web Page RC Snubbers | PDF File

Harmonic Filter Banks (No Feeder Bus) - Mining Spec. | MS Word Harmonic Filter Banks (No Feeder Bus) - Mining Spec. | PDF File Harmonic Filter Banks (With Feeder Bus) - Mining Spec. | MS Word Harmonic Filter Banks (With Feeder Bus) - Mining Spec. | PDF File RC Snubber - Guide Form Spec. | MS Word RC Snubber - Guide Form Spec. | PDF File

The Metal-Enclosed Advantage | PDF File Power capacitor banks and harmonic filter banks can be specified and purchased in two different configurations: Open-Rack or Metal-Enclosed. This technical note presents background information on these configuration options and provides compelling reasons why the metal-enclosed configuration is a better choice. An Alternative To Neutral Unbalance Protection | PDF File This technical note presents an alternate blown fuse detection scheme that utilizes direct fuse sensing. It cost less and provides better protection when compared to neutral-voltage and neutral current unbalance protection. Harmonic Filter Design | MS Excel Spreadsheet tool for calculating harmonic filter parameters. Filter types include: C-High-Pass (damped), Standard High-Pass, and Notch Tuned (Delta and Wye Connected) filters.

Videos The Simplicity of Installing Metal-Enclosed Harmonic Filter Systems Harmonic Filter System Designed for Copper Concentrator Plants Arc Flash Hazard Mitigation (Embracing 0-HARM) Deep Dive Into Real World Harmonic Filters - Large 75 MVAR 5-Stage Filter System Destined for a Large Copper Concentrate Plant Technical Notes Altitude Derating of Metal Enclosed Harmonic Filter Banks Arc Flash Hazard Mitigation in Metal-Enclosed Power Capacitor Banks and Harmonic Filter Banks MTBF (Mean Time Between Failures) and MTTR (Mean Time to Repair) for NEPSIs Metal-Enclosed Solutions LinkedIn Posts Capacitor Banks and Harmonic Filter Banks for Underground Mining Applications Yes we are underground too! Factory Acceptance Tests (FAT) Successfully Completed on Metal-Enclosed Harmonic Filter System Destined for Large Copper Concentrate Plant NEPSI Continues to Grow In South America and Hires Rodrigo Dnner to Support Latin America Mining Industry NEPSI Breaks World Record! Heaviest Single-Stage Metal-Enclosed Harmonic Filter System Ever Shipped Youve seen the heaviest...now see the longest. Meet Bigfoot! HUGE Iron-core Filter Reactor! Large Single Stage C-HP Filter How many medium-voltage metal-enclosed reactive power solutions have we sold and where did they go? Calculators Altitude Correction for High Elevation Projects The Right Way to Do It per IEC and IEEE Standards References Partial Mining Experience for Large Harmonic Filter Systems

minexpo empowers the mining industry to meet global demand | global mining review

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Save to read list Published by Will Owen, Deputy Editor Global Mining Review, Thursday, 01 July 2021 11:45

Mined materials are the building blocks of every current infrastructure project and all future energy technologies. Responsible for feeding the worlds manufacturing, technology, defense and medical supply chains, demand for mined materials is poised to soar as the global economy recovers and emerging markets require increasing amounts of energy each year. Global economic recovery starts with mining, and the heart of that recovery will be on display at MINExpo INTERNATIONAL 2021.

To access those materials, MINExpo has everything mining professionals need, under one roof. In every segment of the mining industry including exploration, mine development, open pit and underground mining, processing, safety, and environmental remediation mining companies are devoting rigorous attention to purchasing decisions. The potential for increased cost savings through dramatic innovations in mining techniques makes this an ideal time to invest in efficiency and explore options that increase access and productivity.

Held in Las Vegas, 13 15 September 2021, MINExpo is the largest and most comprehensive industry event to explore cutting-edge equipment, technologies, and innovations for all mining sectors. With more than 675 000 ft2 and 11 halls, industry professionals can purchase equipment, parts, and services from well-known suppliers in the industry and discover new solutions from groundbreaking startups. In addition to massive equipment, products for the entire mining cycle, new technologies and innovations, MINExpo is also the place to discover software and solutions that digitise the back office, increase productivity, improve health and safety, advance environmental protection, and boost profitability.

The extensive show floor includes more than 1200 suppliers who have what you need today and can demonstrate technologies and innovations for tomorrow. While known for the scale and scope of products, MINExpo provides unmatched opportunities to interact on the show floor with knowledgeable technical experts who will answer questions about what is on display, address operational issues and challenges and identify specific solutions.

Sponsored by the National Mining Association (NMA), MINExpo brings together industry-leading education with the entire spectrum of advanced equipment, technologies, products, and services. The show is committed to following the guidance of the CDC, state and local authorities, as well as the Las Vegas Convention Center a Global Biorisk Advisory Council STAR facility.

In this webinar, Chris Pearson, Group Business Development Director at MMD Group, will discuss in detail their Fully Mobile Surge Loader (FMSL), its key requirements, and implementation considerations.

Mining equipment news National Mining Association news

In this webinar, Chris Pearson, Group Business Development Director at MMD Group, will discuss in detail their Fully Mobile Surge Loader (FMSL), its key requirements, and implementation considerations.

the main role of safety and security systems in the mining industry

In the mining industry, heavy machinery, explosives are used and, very often, these are used in harsh and hazardous conditions. In underground and open-cast mining, even one little mistake may cost hundreds of human lives; therefore, operations in mines must satisfy stringent safety regulations. For illustration, 27 people died in the United States in 2018. Compared to the first half of the 20th century, when there were hundreds of victims of mine accidents (1,688 dead in 1931), this is a significant shift to the better.

Todays mines are better secured in terms of technology (their shafts have been strengthened and processes automated to a high degree, saving lots of hard labour), but also in terms of environmental monitoring and early warning. However, safety and security remain still crucial to mining, as the mining industry carries many risks. How does this industry segment address them?

There are several reasons for the reputation of mines as an unsafe work environment. In addition to the failure of technology or the use of explosives, underground mines are threatened by sudden roof caving, or rock falls, mine inundations or ventilation defects and then a lack of oxygen. Landslides may occur in quarries and open-cast mines. A failure in a single safety element and there is a tragedy. At these latitudes, an explosion occurred relatively recently in the Polish Halemba Mine in 2006, where 23 miners tragically died.

For this reason, mines often have trained staff to maintain safety, as well as safety and security systems that monitor the risks. Given the many dangers involved, these technologies in the mining industry need to be highly sophisticated.

It can be said that the overall decline in fatalities in the mining industry is mostly due to technological advances in safety. There is not one safety and security system. However, it is possible to secure mining sites with a modern, flexible, tailored, end-to-end system, characterised by its scalability and modularity (the individual devices working independently or in cooperation with others), partial or full automation, simple operation from a central control centre or on-site, straightforward testing and maintenance procedures, increased durability and its overall reliability.

Cutting-edge products and modern solutions can be found in Telegrafia, fully functional even in the highly demanding environment like mines. Electronic sirens such as Bono or Screamer (that can be used as mobile sirens in open-pit mines and quarries) offer a variety of settings, power supplies and audio signals. The sirens can be linked to a central command and control centre (OCP16), a remote-control unit (RCU15), and to monitoring stations or software that allows staff to operate the entire system from one or more locations.

Mining is a risky industrial sector, but with the help of modern technology, the situation has improved over time. Despite its unenviable reputation, the number of casualties has dramatically dropped. The adherence to both occupational safety and system security standards is a guarantee for mining companies and their staff that the risks can be minimised, and at the end of the day, building such safety and security systems is a profitable investment.

Zuzana works at Telegrafia at the marketing department. Her main responsibility is to keep an eye on Google Ads and Facebook. Online marketing is changing all the time, giving her the chance to expand her knowledge constantly and put it into real practice. After work, she relaxes best by going to the gym and watching good films.

latest mining technology trends & industry challenges | anglo american

The latest technology trends in mining indicate a compelling industry shift towards sustainability. Digital technology works harder than ever to deliver a truly modern, safe, and productive mine that addresses the increased demand for mined materials, while at the same time exceeding customer expectations and global sustainability initiatives.

By using new technology like spatial data effectively, the mining industry gains insights into mine systems at a reduced cost and impact on the environment. The mining industry is steadily moving toward a future where its possible to virtually construct and deconstruct buildings, plants, mines, and all associated infrastructure before even breaking ground to create a truly intelligent mine.

Geographic information systems (GIS) are an integral tool that allows a deeper look at how geographic relationships influence the world around us. With the help of GIS, miners are able to solve real-life issues where location and accessibility are critical.

Geospatial data represents an objects location, size, and shape. By visualising this kind of data, miners gain more insight into the represented system or mine environment. GIS is used to gain insight into the following:

When mining today, geospatial data software allows us to train mine managers and employees in new ways, and improve long-term understanding of mining with virtual interpretations of real-life environments.

Artificial intelligence (AI) now leads the decision-making at insight-driven firms. They use smart data and machine learning to improve operational efficiency, mine safety, and production workflow. Implementing artificial intelligence technology generates day-to-day data in half the time than what has been used previously in the field.

The mining industry evolves rapidly, so machine learning and AI impact the way mines today make choices for the future. Here are some ways the latest technology in artificial intelligence impacts the working mine:

This is just another step towards optimal industry efficiency. As the mining industry attempts to reduce costs and lessen its environmental impact, using mining equipment like AI helps to ensure safety and reliability for both miners and the land that mines use.

In recent years, drones or unmanned aerial systems (UAS) have started to make headway across the mining industry. UAS now produce the same results as a helicopter at a lower cost. Drones, when set to perform operational tasks, improve the industry by providing the following services:

At Anglo American, weve invested a lot of time assessing how innovation can help our industry address its challenges. Through FutureSmart MiningTM, we draw on the expertise of diverse stakeholders, including our employees, partners in academia and civil society, and peers in the mining and parallel industries. Our objective: to drive toward a more sustainable approach to mining by using the latest mining equipment and cutting-edge mining software.