mobile gold panning equipment prices

gold prospecting

Whether you are sluicing, dredging, drywashing, or just a weekend gold panner, this is YOUR forum! Talk about your favorite rivers/lakes, equipment, techniques, and anything else related to prospecting for gold. The ORIGINAL gold dredging, sluicing, drywashing and panning forum!

treasurenet - the original treasure hunting website

TreasureNet Members are always welcome to organize their own hunts! This forum is where these "unofficial" hunts can be discussed, and experiences shared! Metal Detecting is a great way to get exercise, meet people in public spaces, and find cool things from our past. Join us in the great a hobby of metal detecting... and experience a lifetime of fascinating finds and adventures.

Do you have an idea for a new feature here at TreasureNet? Do you have any suggestions on how we can do things better? Frequently asked questions, ideas, suggestions and site feedback for TreasureNet can be found here.

We've only scratched the surface of what is still waiting to be discovered in our oceans and lakes. Billions are just sitting there waiting to be discovered. Use the Shipwreck Forum to discuss wrecks and other underwater treasures, and the technologies used to recover them. This is the original Shipwreck Forum!

Have you heard or read about a treasure that's been discovered? Here's the place to let the treasure hunting community know about it. Please post the credits if you read or heard about it in the media.

The Original Metal Detecting Forum. Share your experiences here, and learn from others. What's the oldest coin you've ever found? Have you ever found a diamond ring? A Gold Coin? The chat room for detectorists.

Old farmhouses, ghost towns and other historical sites are loaded with relics of our past. What have you found? What are you looking for? The Relic Hunting Forum is the place for old items - especially iron, lead and other non-precious objects.

Whether you are sluicing, dredging, drywashing, or just a weekend gold panner, this is YOUR forum! Talk about your favorite rivers/lakes, equipment, techniques, and anything else related to prospecting for gold. The ORIGINAL gold dredging, sluicing, drywashing and panning forum!

Metal detecting for gold nuggets can be fun AND profitable! If you hunt for gold nuggets with a metal detector, this is YOUR forum, feel free to post your best finds, talk about the best areas to hunt (if you want!) or just about anything else related to searching for gold nuggets with a metal detector.

The prospecting equivalent to vacuuming up treasure, gold sluicing is one of the most efficient gold retrieval methods known. With the right tools and some determination, gold sluicing can be most rewarding. Share your experiences and ask your questions here. This forum is also just a great place to hang out!

For just a few dollar investment and some sweat equity, anyone can get out and start finding gold. It's fun, great exercise, and you can actually find real gold! Ask the experts here how they got started... or share your experience and wisdom! Gold panning is alive and well in the 21st century!

It's all about technique and location! The rest is hard! :-) Our drywashing members are a rugged bunch... stop on in and get an ear --er panful. :-) This forum is where everything is on the rocks!

We encourage all our members to create videos of their hunts and discoveries! There is no better way to share the thrill of discovery.... Stop in here for REAL videos from REAL treasure hunters..... you'll be amazed!

If you are aware of any conventional or unconventional technique that others can use to locate treasure, post it here. This would be a good place to talk about infrared photography and treasure sniffing dogs.

Need help getting started in treasure hunting? Looking for new ways to improve your finds? Willing to share the secrets of your success? This is the place to swap ideas, experiences, tips & techniques, and other how-to info.

Marbles are common finds for metal detectorists... even though they're not metal! Some marbles can be quite valuable! Share your marbles finds with others here! Some people really have lost their marbles!

For thousands of years people have divined for water and hidden objects. Use this forum to discuss L-rods, Spanish dip needles, map dowsing, and other dowsing related subjects. Discussion is limited to simple, inexpensive devices and techniques. (no electronic LRL discussions please)

Government and Military employees sharing stories, pictures, support, research, assignments, links, and information on timely issues. Civilians, Enlisted, Officers, Retirees and those who support them from every country and every service. A friendly board about people, NOT politics.

basic equipment for new filmmaking students | b&h explora

Congrats on starting film school! Your first day of classes is around the corner and you are probably already trying to figure out what equipment youll need to get started. Fortunately, most programs have many important tools available for studentsnamely big stuff such as camcorders and lights. Still, there are accessories, expendables, and other pieces of gear that youll want to have on hand or own yourself. So what exactly do you need to be prepared for film school? Luckily, not all that much.

To get started, you can likely get away with a camcorder, mirrorless camera, or DSLR with high-quality Full HD video capabilities. It is quite easy to get an inexpensive model with 4K video these days, so that is definitely worth looking into. If you are just starting your program and you are lucky enough to have access to great, modern cameras, then you should be okay getting something relatively cheap for your personal kit.

I would recommend a current mirrorless model, and some of the most common for beginners would be the Sony a6400 and FUJIFILM X-T30. You could also go the camcorder route, though it is turning into more of a niche these days. I think the latest 1"-type camcorders are the most interesting and offer a great price for the features available. In addition, you could consider adding a GoPro or DJI Osmo Action for some specific shots where you dont want to risk your regular camera. I will say, if you have the cash, you can just go for it and invest in a Canon C200 or Sony FS5 II, both excellent cinema cameras. All of these options, when handled properly, can create cinematic footage.

To be honest, if you are in a multi-year program, by the time you finish, whatever camera model you have will be on its way out of style, as is the nature of digital filmmaking. If you want to make some serious investments, I would say go for good lenses and accessories that will last for years to come. Which leads us to

If this is your first interchangeable-lens system, it is hard not to advise going with a versatile kit zoom. The bundled zoom lens can do a decent job and shouldnt be avoided. Good technique will allow you to make great films, regardless of equipment. You should look into getting some new lenses though, some that will be good even when you get your next camera. Im a fan of primes, especially for video. If you do want a zoom, perhaps for documentary or run-and-gun filmmaking, you will want to look for terms such as parfocal and constant aperture. Parfocal means that focus breathing is non-existent, allowing you to zoom the lens without shifting the focus position. Constant apertures mean that the aperture (and therefore brightness of your image) wont change as you adjust zoom position. This is important in video where you need things to stay consistent as you make adjustments during a shot.

As for primes, go for something in the middle. A 50mm, or 50mm equivalent if you are using a format other than full frame, is one of the safest bets. I prefer it a bit wider, at 35mm, so decide based on your own personal preference and vision. Assuming you went with a zoom along with your camera, you can always pay attention to what focal lengths you use most and build from there. As for features, ideally youll want a lens with a stepless aperture ring and a smooth, linear-response manual focus system. Also, you want focusing to be mechanical, since it gives a reliable and repeatable feeling, but modern focus-by-wire lenses will offer linear-response MF as the next best thing. Additionally, AF in video is now quite good, so there is no reason to avoid current autofocus lenses if you intend to stick with the system.

Along with your lenses, you should look into filters. Once you learn and understand the 180 rule (which essentially says you should try to keep your shutter speed equal to 1/(2 x frame rate), youll quickly realize the importance of a ND filter. Circular polarizers are nice, too, but ND filters shine for video. The best solution is to pick up a large 82mm Variable ND Filter and a set of step-up rings. This lets you use the same filter for any lens.

If you have access to a gear locker that has lighting equipment, I would highly recommend using that instead of buying your own. Lighting equipment is bulky, not exactly something you want to store in a dorm room. Also, the equipment your school has is likely more professional and I would advise that you learn how to use that first. Now, the massive improvements to LED technology over the past decade have changed the equation.

Building your own compact lighting kit is totally doable and affordable, thanks to the latest LEDs. These also have added benefits over classic tungsten and fluorescent fixtures. Namely, they can be extremely compact and run on batteries. This is why you may want to consider picking up a couple for yourself and building a kit that can end up supplementing other lights you may end up using on set.

A nice key, or primary, light is something powerful and modifiable. I would go with a single-point option such as the Aputure Light Storm LS C120D II. Its a very good, very popular light. Another route is an affordable LED panel because it provides a nice, softer source and many have adjustable color temperatures for matching other light sources. You can even get both or other types of lights to use in different scenarios. Of course, you can always look into tungsten and fluorescent if you want.

To get the best results from your lights, you have to pick up some light stands or clamps. You might find yourself wanting to have a set of filters, diffusers, and gels. Though you will probably have access to a lot of this lighting equipment through your school, its good for you to take the time to learn about the options available out there and the costs involved in assembling the tools and gear you need for professional lighting techniques and results. Eventually, you may also reach the point where its time to invest in your own cine meter or spot meter, so take a look at whats out there, and think about and plan for the kinds of lighting tools that might be part of your future as a filmmaker.

There are levels to audio, and the best of the best is to have a dedicated sound expert on set to handle all your recording needs. A separate person just cant be beat and audio is just as, if not more important than your video. If you are doing it yourself, or simply want to monitor what is going on while on set or in the edit bay, you will need a set of nice headphones. You dont even need to spend that much to get a solid set with some of the most popular being the Sony MDR-7506. These will let you listen to your sound, which is the only way to know exactly what you are getting. Not having headphones would be like recording video without checking your cameras screen.

Upgrading your personal cameras audio is the next step if you are doing this on your own. The simplest solution is to go with an on-camera mic that plugs directly into your cameras 3.5mm input. A RDE VideoMic will certainly do the trick. The shotgun is great for mobile recording and capturing ambient audio but for vlogging and interviews it is hard to beat the classic lavalier. These exceptionally small mics can be wired up to your talent and provide crisp, clear audio for talking subjects.

To get better than that you will need to move up for professional microphones and dedicated audio recorders. Though, some cameras do have professional XLR inputs that can work directly with some of these microphones. Go-to options for video are the shotgun mic, wireless lavaliers, and sometimes cardioid and omnidirectional. Some recommendations would include the RDE NTG3 and RDE Wireless GO if you are looking for some mics to start with. Keep in mind that you will need some accessories to make the most of them, including boompoles or lavaliers. If your camera does not have XLR inputs and you want to use a mic that has XLR connectivity, you can always solve that problem with an XLR adapter.

An external, handheld digital recorder is the best solution for capturing audio and will likely be necessary for professional mics. This is called dual-system sound as it is completely separate from the video camera. To make the most of this you will need a slate to mark the start of a take and help with syncing in post. There are a lot of different options for audio recorders, but if you are getting serious about film I always say go for something with at least two XLR inputs. This will give you a good starting point and a little room to expand later on.

Absolutely! A tripod that can pan and tilt is a basic requirement for shooting video. A fluid head video tripod will give you the best results, but a regular photo tripod with a pan-and-tilt head can also work. Your goal when shooting, even with an inexpensive consumer camcorder, should be to get still shots that dont look like home videos. Mounting your camera on a tripod will not only keep your camera steady, it will also help you avoid shooting from the familiar angles that scream home-video to a viewer. With the rock-solid framing support that a tripod can provide, youll end up with better, more consistent footage that aligns more with your vision. And when the time comes, youll be able to shoot without the tripod for more dramatic effects.

Another approach is to add steady movement to your shots. This can be done quite effectively with modern sliders and handheld gimbals. Sliders are the closest thing to a dolly you can reasonably get set up, travel with, and use by yourself. Gimbal stabilizers have completely changed handheld filmmaking. Effectively replacing the Steadicam, current gimbals will help you capture super-smooth footage even when bouncing around with your camera. Both of these are seriously good options for making your footage look more professional.

In addition to the camera, mic, lights, and headphones, you may also want to set yourself up with some essential tools to have with you on your shoots. A convenient gaffers kit can get you started, but if you want to put together your own, you should include a few different colors of 2" gaffer tape, a multi-tool with a good blade (a serrated blade can be especially useful for cutting rope), a handful of permanent markers and a decent pair of work gloves. Your gloves wont just protect you while youre setting up or taking down a set, theyll also protect your hands when youre working with hot lights, doing things like adjusting barndoors or swapping out gels. As for the flashlight, one is a must, but having a backup on hand could really save you some headaches if your trusty torch gives up the ghost, or a day shoot lasts well into the night and theres nowhere nearby to get batteries.

Though it might not fit into your tool kit, it also never hurts to have a small, LED book light that you can clip onto your notepad or your shooting script. While your multi-tool will be very handy on the set, you may also want to supplement it with a 68" crescent wrench as well as a screwdriver with interchangeable heads, and a tape measure. And, of course, dont forget to get yourself a handy tool pouch. One last thing to note: if youre doing any work on a film crew, whether during the school year or during a break, it never hurts to bring along your own two-way radio headset (thats labeled with your name).

Thanks for sharing this great article, keep it up! Indeed live streaming for business is a new trend and is now gaining a lot of recognitions from different platforms. This article is very important for entrepreneurs out there who wants to try this strategy.

I need a high quality wireless lavalier mic that works with a Galaxy S20 Plus usb c (or adapters can be bought to work with usb c). But it also needs to be budget-friendly. Not looking to spend more than $300. The mic will be used for an outdoor musical performance by a singer live social media broadcast, so there must be NO INTERFERENCE or close to none. Any recommendations?

Equally straightforward and small, the Blink 500 B5 gives you everything necessary for recording crisp, clear speech in any location. You get a clip-on transmitter with a built-in microphone and a clip-on omni lavalier mic, a dual-channel receiver that plugs directly into your device, and the requisite charging cable for the transmitter. Whether you're a run-and-gun videographer, a YouTube content creator, or an avid vlogger, the Blink 500 B5 can get your wireless audio going in no time.

I work as a grip/electric and assistant camera in WI. Graduated from UW-Milwaukee Film School. If you're interested in being on set as a grip (which is a great starting point for any aspiring Gaffer or DP), get this basic kit:

In fact, get this kit if you want to show up on set as any position and make yourself worth your weight in salt. The people who hire you (and thus allow you to make a living in this field) will appreciate it and invite you onto the next job.

Thanks for the info, that was extremely helpful. My son is in his 2nd yr as a new media student at a local college and he wants to build a portfolio to get either an internship or job. He doesn't want to spend the money for cheaper cameras and they become obsolete. Any suggestions about cameras, jobs and internships? Greatly appreciated. This is all greek to me. Be well. :)

The A6600 is a great option to consider. It will give you high quality 4K and HD record, has fully manual controls and a 3.5mm mic input. There are also plenty of great E-Mount lenses options on the market. We have it in a kit with an 18-135mm which is in your budget and a great starting option.

I have been making podcasts using a Zoom H6, Audio-technica 2100 xlr mic and an Aputure lavalier mic. I want to add video but don't know where to start with a good but reasonably priced camera or camcorder. There will be two main formats: indoor interviews and short outdoor scenic pieces, usually with voiceover. Whatever I get will need to work with my existing equipment as audio quality is important to me. Can you recommend any cameras that would fit the bill?

TheCanon 32GB VIXIA HF G20 Full HD Camcorder (Refurbished)shoots 1920 x 1080 Full HD video at 60i, in native 24p and 30p. With the 24p frame rate option you can give your footage a cinematic look. Using Cinema-Looks Filters you can boost that film look with multiple built-in adjustable filters. The HF G20 (Refurbished) features a genuine Canon 10x HD video lens with an 8-Blade iris, for more professional-looking video and stills. It has a 30.4 to 304mm (35mm equivalent) focal length. The camcorder is also equipped with a Canon HD CMOS Pro image sensor that supports improved low-light performance and a wide dynamic range.

Please click on the green underscored words and phrases above to follow the links to the specific product pages of our B&H website where you will find the pricing for the products featureed in the article above.

In need of a filming setup to use for recording floral design videos. The design courses will range from 1-3 hours and will be using a fixed and moveable setting. Would prefer HD quality and will be interested in lighting, separate mics for dual instructors, and a stable setup to prevent shaky production. Budget is around 2k.

4K is no longer reserved for theatrical cinema presentation; it is in demand at all levels of production. With Ultra HD recording, the GY-HM170UA 4KCAM Compact Professional Camcorder with Top Handle Audio Unit from JVC is designed to fulfill the requirement for professional functionality. It offers ND filters, custom-assign buttons, and professional audio inputs with manual gain control in a form-factor closer to a consumer camcorder. The camera records 3840 x 2180 4K in 24 or 30p, at a bit rate of 150 Mbps, encoding the file in an .MOV-wrapped H.264 codec. With two SDHC/SDXC card slots, the camera supports dual, backup, and continuous recording. Besides 4K, it can also record 1080p at up to 60 fps in an 8-bit 4:2:2 50 Mbps .MOV file, or in AVCHD for compatibility with consumer editing software.

For monitoring, there is a flip-out LCD screen with a 920,000-pixel panel, plus a 0.24" viewfinder with 1.56-megapixel resolutionthe latter being especially helpful when working in bright daylight. For an external monitor, connecting to a live switcher, or recording video externally, there is an HDMI port with live 4K output. The included top handle audio unit features two XLR audio inputs for use with external microphones, offering switchable Mic/Line/Mic +48 inputs with independent gain control. It attaches to your camera's accessory shoe and secures with a slotted thumbscrew. It features electrical contacts on its foot that enable audio signal transmission to the camera without any cable required. An accessory shoe and shotgun mic clamp are available on top.

The Magnus VT-4000 Tripod System with Fluid Head is a stable, sturdy video tripod made from anodized aluminum that can support loads up to 8.8 lb. Overall, this tripod offers many features usually only found on more expensive models. The two-way fluid head provides smooth operation, and features a half-ball mount with a diameter of 65mm, with left and right pan bar mounts. It comes supplied with one pan bar. In addition, unlike most other heads in its class, all the head controls are positioned on the left side of the head, which leaves your right hand free for the panning handle. The VT-4000 tripod system weighs 7.9 lb.

The AT803B is a miniature condenser microphone intended to be worn on the clothing of performers for excellent yet unobtrusive sound pickup. The wide range capability of the AT803B ensures clean, accurate reproduction with high intelligibility for lecturers, singers, stage and TV performers.

I am a high school teacher. I teach math, but I love movies and movie making. I started a club at my school for students who are interested in the same. I have 12 students in the club. We have agreed on creating a documentary about anxiety disorders and panic attacks among teenage students. I don't have access to any cam corders or video camera. So we mostly capturing video on phone cameras. I have started a gofundme project to try to raise enough money to buy at least enough equipment for one location (i.e. one camera, one tripod, and a couple of lights with stands). I would appreciate information about how to maybe get a company to donate old equipment. Any ideas?

I have been filming for a while and I am planning on going to film school, but lately I have not been happy at where I'm currently at in filming. I have two canon cameras and a go pro. I also have power director 13.0 for my editing softwear. I think they work fine, but do you have any suggestions as to how to make my filming better?

It sounds like you may have thebasicscovered. You have not described your camerasthough Consider adding externalmicrophones,sincequality audio is so essential to good video storytelling. On-camera orstudiolighting should be considered as well.

This article is a great place to start your gear list. Also, check out this article from Thomas Simms:http://www.bhphotovideo.com/explora/video/buying-guide/back-school17-needs-and-18-wants-film-school

My 14 year-old daughter has been making videos using the I-movie app on her i-pad, and utilizing a cell phone to capture/edit videos as well for a few years now. She will be attending a digital media arts program at her high school the next 4 years, and I wanted you advice on what type of camera (and other equipment) we should get her, as she'll need to start filming for projects, etc.

Your daughters school should most likely send you a list of the requirements needed for a camera/gear for her program. Once they do that, I would suggest sending us an email with the requirements, and we would be happy to make some recommendations. If they havent sent you a list yet, and you are getting anxious about the upcoming school year, you could always contact them to see if/when they will send you a supplies/camera minimum requirement list. [emailprotected]

First Light Video DVD: Camera Operation: This introductory-level program focuses on camera components, white balance, zoom, focus, depth-of-field along with the dos & don'ts of basic camera operation.

If you're considering a leap into the world of digital filmmaking Sonja Schenk and Ben Long have written the guide for you. Their book from Cengage Learning, The Digital Filmmaking Handbook, 4th Edition, is a 608 page tome on the what, when, and where of the craft. Both Schenk and Long are entrenched in the industry; drawing on their years of experience the pair guide you with not only tips and advice, but exercises and summaries at the end of each chapter, meant to commend the topics covered to memory. You'll learn digital workflow from preproduction to postproduction, including how to work in HD and how to shoot successfully with DSLR cameras, among many other invaluable skills.

Includes coverage of all the latest digital video technology and advances, including HD video, shooting with digital SLR cameras, workflows for direct-to-disc recording, and shooting and editing multi-camera projects

1. Introduction2. Writing and Scheduling3. Video Technology Basics4. Choosing a Camera5. Planning Your Shoot6. Lighting7. Video Cameras8. Digital Still Cameras (DSLRs)9. Shooting10. Production Sound11. Workstations and Hardware for Editing12. Editing Software13. Preparing to Edit14. Editing15. Sound Editing16. Color Correction17. Titling and Motion Graphics18. OutputAbout the DVDGlossary

Sonja SchenkSonja Schenk (Venice, CA) is a freelance producer and film video editor who has worked on a number of popular television shows and movies. She is also the author of Digital Non-Linear Desktop Editing and co-author of both earlier editions of The Digital Filmmaking Handbook

Ben LongBen Long is a San Francisco-based photographer and writer. The author of over a dozen books on digital photography and digital video; he has been a longtime contributor or contributing editor to many magazines including MacWeek, MacUser, Macworld UK, and others. He is a Senior Contributing Editor for Macworld magazine, and a Senior Editor at CreativePro.com. His photography clients include 20th Century Fox, Blue Note Records, Global Business Network, the San Francisco Jazz Festival, the Pickle Family Circus, and Grammy-nominated jazz musicians Don Byron and Dafnis Prieto. He has taught and lectured on photography around the world

thanks for the information very useful, would you be able to advise on a good camera for making documentaries? im only starting so something to play with till i can afford a more up to date one and when im more skilled. thanks

The cutting-edge Sony HXR-NX30 Palm Size NXCAM HD Camcorder is a handheld, excellently built HD camcorder that's capable of capturing AVCHD video in Full HD 1080p at 60 fps, as well as high-quality digital still images. It's equipped with 96GB of internal flash memory, an LED video light and NightShot capabilities. It also supports all AVCHD recording formats at 28 Mbps.

The true innovation behind Sony's HXR-NX30 is its 1/2.88 ExmorR image sensor and ultra-wide angle Carl Zeiss 10x optical zoom lens. The lens is mounted within a gyroscope, which affords unbelievable image stabilization. Sony's calls their innovative technology Balanced Optical SteadyShot with Active Mode. In fact, you can choose to shoot in fixed mode, without stabilization, or you can easily switch on the SteadyShot whenever needed. This feature is great for walking and shooting or for journalists who may need to hold the camera steady, high-above their head while demanding the truth in front of city hall.

Other highlights include an onboard level control section with several professional audio controls for tweaking your sound levels just right. The camera also affords dual XLR inputs with phantom power and a stereo shotgun mic (included). If that's not enough, the camera's integrated projector, which is built right into the back of the LCD display, definitely puts this model over the top. Plus, with the ability to project up to a 100" diagonal image on any flat, near-white surface, the projector really opens up the possibilities of how you can use your HD camcorder.

The innovative Balanced Optical SteadyShot image stabilization system eliminates the influence of vibrations from the body by enclosing the entire optical block, from the lens to the image sensor, in a "floating" space. Combined with electronic image stabilization that compensates for rotation around the optical axis, this new system provides powerful image stabilization even when shooting whilst zooming, which was previously difficult to achieve. You can record stable images with minimal blur, every time. To optimize the effect of Balanced Optical SteadyShot, the HXR-NX30 features a FIXED SHOT mode. Press a button and this expands the movable range of the optical block to keep you locked on your subject. This is particularly convenient when you want to maintain the same shooting angle for an extended period

As you can imagine, there is no single camera or audio device that can be recommended without your input regarding budget, specific projects, shooting style and experience. That said, consider the SonyAlpha a58 DSLR Camera Kit with 18-55mm and 18-135mm Lenses from B&H combines this compact APS-C format DSLR with two versatile zoom lenses to cover almost all shooting situations from wide-angle to full telephoto.

The Alpha a58 DSLR provides a 20.1MP Exmor APS-C HD CMOS sensor and the BIONZ image processor and the result is high-resolution still photography and full HD 1080p/i video capture at 24 and 60 fps, respectively. Translucent Mirror Technology and Phase Detection AF provide accurate and fast auto focus and 5 fps continuous shooting at maximum resolution. A 1,440k-dot SVGA Electronic Viewfinder and a 2.7" 460.8k-dot tilt LCD screen both offer playback and live view composition. SteadyShot INSIDE Stabilization is an in-camera system for reducing the blur created by camera shake and the ISO range on the a58 runs to 16000 for clearer low light capture. Both a built-in flash and hot shoe mount are supported. Other features include Auto Object Framing, Sweep Panorama, Tracking Focus, Auto High Dynamic Range and Picture Effects.

For an external microphone. I recommend the Shure VP83 LensHopper Shotgun Microphone which is a compact camera-mount condenser that provides detailed, high-definition audio with DSLR cameras and camcorders. An integrated Rycote Lyre shock mounting system provides isolation from vibration and mechanical noise.

The VP83 LensHopper features an easily accessible three-position gain adjustment and low-cut filter, allowing it to adapt for different recording environments. Its lightweight, yet durable, metal construction provides dependability and long-life. The VP83 easily mounts to a standard-size camera shoe or a 1/4" threaded stand. The convenient, attached 3.5mm cable connects to your camera's audio input. Its efficient operation boasts 130 hours of battery life on just one AA alkaline battery. A foam windscreen is included to guard against wind and environmental noise.

First Light Video DVD: Camera Operation: This introductory-level program focuses on camera components, white balance, zoom, focus, depth-of-field along with the dos & dont's of basic camera operation.

If you're considering a leap into the world of digital filmmaking Sonja Schenk and Ben Long have written the guide for you. Their book from Cengage Learning, The Digital Filmmaking Handbook, 4th Edition, is a 608 page tome on the what, when, and where of the craft. Both Schenk and Long are entrenched in the industry; drawing on their years of experience the pair guide you with not only tips and advice, but exercises and summaries at the end of each chapter, meant to commend the topics covered to memory. You'll learn digital workflow from preproduction to postproduction, including how to work in HD and how to shoot successfully with DSLR cameras, among many other invaluable skills.

Ben LongBen Long is a San Francisco-based photographer and writer. The author of over a dozen books on digital photography and digital video; he has been a longtime contributor or contributing editor to many magazines including MacWeek, MacUser, Macworld UK, and others. He is a Senior Contributing Editor for Macworld magazine, and a Senior Editor at CreativePro.com. His photography clients include 20th Century Fox, Blue Note Records, Global Business Network, the San Francisco Jazz Festival, the Pickle Family Circus, and Grammy-nominated jazz musicians Don Byron and Dafnis Prieto. He has taught and lectured on photography around the world

Prices, specifications, and images are subject to change without notice. Not responsible for typographical or illustrative errors. Manufacturer rebates, terms, conditions, and expiration dates are subject to manufacturers printed forms NYC DCA Lic.: Elec. Store #0906712 Elec. & Home App. Serv. Deal. #0907905; Sec. Hd. Deal. Gen. #0907906