muncie rock crusher 4 speed

new auto gear super case muncie m22 4-speed rock-crusher street/strip. camaro, corvette, chevelle, nova. summer sale on now!!! - muncie 4 speed transmissions and rebuild kits

New Super Heavy Duty Direct Replacement and Strongest M22s Made With Muncie Auto Gear Super Case and Strongest M22 Close Ratio or Wide Ratio Gears. 10 OR 26 spline input and large 27 OR 32 spline output shaft. C355 Forged Aluminum Mid-Plate. Super Tail. AG Roller Side Cover. A great Super Heavy Duty Rock Crusher M22 for your Camaro, Nova, Chevelle, Corvette or other GM car. Close Ratio = 2.20-1st, 1.64-2nd, 1.28-3rd, 4th direct. Wide Ratio = 2.56-1st, 1.75-2nd, 1.36-3rd, 4th direct or comp M22w 2.56-1st, 1.90-2nd, 1.48-3rd. Built for big HP.

My experience with MidWest Muncie has been the Best. Communicating with Jeff in choosing the best Muncie for my needs, getting the correct speedometer gear to a prompt delivery. Again, Thank You for the great customer service. Larry Haynes.

magical muncie four-speed | hotrod hotline

Transmissions are an essential part of hot rod builds. One of the most common swaps involves a Muncie 4-speed. These are easy to adapt to a wide range of hot rods. There are three basic types of Muncies: M20, M21 and M22.

A Muncie differs from a Saginaw transmission in that its reverse lever is in the tail housing, not the side cover. The difference between a Muncie and a Borg-Warner is the Muncies 7-bolt side cover (two less than Borg-Warner units).

Many Muncie main cases, tail housings and side covers have casting date codes. The code consists of two -in. circles divided in half. One is the date marker and the other the status marker. One side of the date marker has a month designator 1-12. The opposite side has up to five dots that indicate the week of the month. The status marker was used at the Muncie, IN plant to keep track of problems and is generally not important to enthusiasts. Hot rod builders are usually not too concerned with codes, but some units are pretty rare.

A serial number is stamped on all Muncie transmission cases. The code has nine symbols that will reveal the GM division, year, model, assembly plant and car the transmission was used in. The first symbol indicates division, the second matches the last digit of he model year and the third tells what assembly plant the car was built in. The last six digits are the last six digits of the cars VIN.

David W. West of Davids 4 Speeds LLC is a specialist who rebuilds Big 3 four-speed transmissions and who can help you identify what youve got. About 95 percent of Wests work involves Muncies. West says all Muncies work on the same basic principle: The input shaft goes to the cluster gear. The cluster is mated to the speed gears. The speed gears are independent of the main shaft.

The magic of the Muncie is in the synchro assemblies. The synchro hub is splined on the main shaft. The slider and the synchro ring grabbing on the cone of the gear allows the slider to engage the engagement teeth on the gears.

West tells people to think of a transmission in terms of levers. The lever is engine power. It creates leverage just like extending the length of a wrench. If you take a one-foot wrench and increase its length by two feet, it will break a tight bolt loose. The principle of a transmission is the same. With the leverage and the gears combined with a lever action, you increase the power an engine makes.

The Muncie M20 is basically a wide-ratio transmission and was intended for normal street driving use. The early ones had a 2.56:1 first gear. The later 1966-1974 units had a 2.52:1 first gear. They are compatible with a GM 3 Series differential. They are for economy and street drivability and just cruising.

The Muncie M21 is a close-ratio unit originally designed to be matched with 4.11:1 or 4.56:1 GM 4 Series differentials. Of course, rodders get a little creative. The M21 was for higher performance cars, which makes it a great box to use in a rod. A close-ratio gearbox keeps shift points closer together, which keeps rpms up. With a close-ratio box a driver can run through the gears and keep the engine in its power band so it performs in street racing or drag racing.

The M22 has higher-nickel-content gears of straight-cut design. It uses much the same gear ratios as the close-ratio M-21, but it can handle much more abuse. An M22 retains less heat due to the straight-cut gear design and the lack of thrust that helical-cut gears create. An M-22 holds up well. The downside is that it tends to make noise. It will rattle at low rpms and whine at higher rpms. The M22 is called the Rock Crusher. Dump the Rock Crusher, hot rodders say. People think all Muncie four-speeds are Rock Crushers, but theyre not.

Nowadays there are custom gear ratios and set ups, including M21 wide-ratio and M22 wide-ratio units. You can pretty much get what you want. Beefed up boxes for hot rods and Resto-Mods are popular, too.

When rebuilding a Muncie four-speed you can take a 65 case and put in later year parts. West bores the cluster pin and puts in a 1-nch pin. Then, he can put in a later synchro assembly and have the modern functionality with old looks.

Synthetic oils shouldnt be used in a Muncie. Synthetics are not synchro friendly. They are so slippery they dont allow synchro rings to grab on to the cone of the gear and synchronize properly. This will lead to grinding the gears. Synthetics also have a different consistency then a natural fluid. The early Muncie cases, especially, tend to be more porous so they dont hold up well with a synthetic. The synthetics leak out of them more easily than natural gear lubes.

GL5 fluid is another choice these days. It is said to be superceding GL4. GL5 has not been around as long enough to know how its going to unfold. West thinks GL5 has sulfur in it thats corrosive to brass. Like a synthetic, it doesnt allow synchro rings to grab the cones of the gears. So, stick to a GL4 for now

One of the main transmission issues is shifter problems. Grit that gets into the grease in the shifter mechanism can cause real problems. People also fail realize how important the shifter geometry is. A shifter handle has a specific bend to it.. Anything that impedes the shifters movement can keep a shifter from going in and going as far as it has to.

Muncie shifters have three selector plates coming out the bottom that have a unique bend and unique length that corresponds with the arm thats attached to the shift shaft. The rods are unique to each application. If you mix and match randomly, the length and shape of the bends will change and affect the shifting geometry. Having the proper geometry is a necessity. Often a hot rodder will say his transmission is grinding in fourth, but geometry is the problem.

how to identify a m22 rock crusher | it still runs

An M-22 "Rock Crusher" is a Muncie four-speed transmission for cars made by General Motors in the 1960s. Identify a transmission type correctly before fitting it into your car. If you have the incorrect transmission, your car may not function properly. You can identify several unique signs that identify an M-22 "Rock Crusher," even if it does not have a GM hallmark imprinted on its surface.

An M-22 "Rock Crusher" is a Muncie four-speed transmission for cars made by General Motors in the 1960s. Identify a transmission type correctly before fitting it into your car. If you have the incorrect transmission, your car may not function properly. You can identify several unique signs that identify an M-22 "Rock Crusher," even if it does not have a GM hallmark imprinted on its surface.

Check the casting number, the production year and the gear ratios on the aluminum serial number plate attached to the transmission box. Every GM Rock Crusher has a casting number with which you can easily identify a transmission box.

Count the input shaft teeth to find out the make of the transmission. Input shafts differ in each GM transmission, so you can easily identify an M-22 "Rock Crusher by its input shaft count. Each transmission has different numbers of teeth. An M-22 "Rock Crusher" always has 26 teeth.

Janos Gal has been writing since 2008. He wrote for the "Global Journalist" magazine in 2008 and for the "Estrella de Arica" daily in 2009. Gal has traveled extensively in Europe, South America and the United States. He holds a Bachelor of Arts, honors, in journalism from Edinburgh Napier University.

the muncie 4 speed transmission taught a generation of muscle car fans to drive manual | drivingline

The Muncie 4-speed transmission is a legend among fans of GM muscle cars. For a 10 year period starting in the golden age of 1960s performance, General Motors' Muncie, Indiana transmission factory churned out several different flavors of this manual gearbox. This imprinted the name on the brains of drag racers and high performance fans after it was included with some of the hottest vehicles of the era.

The Muncie earned its keep by offering a better shifting experience than any other gearbox to date from Chevrolet, Pontiac, Oldsmobile, and Buick. It was no accident, either: the 4-speed was the product of careful engineering intended to modernize GM's transmission offerings, and it benefited from continual updates during its decade-long run as the go-to shift-it-yourself option.

In the early 1960s, GM was looking to move away from the four-speed manual transmissions it had been purchasing from BorgWarner and bring production in-house. The twist was the four-speed gearbox found in the first two generations of the Chevrolet Corvettethe BorgWarner T10had in fact been built using plans supplied by a GM engineer named James Fodrea, based on the earlier BorgWarner 3-speed T85 gearbox. Unable to justify a small production run for the Vette program, GM had instead farmed out the T10, and the company borrowed as much as it could from the T85's internals to keep costs down (and eventually sold the transmission to GM's rivals at Chrysler and Ford).

The Muncie transmission and the T10 are visibly very similar, but it's the differences that would make GM's newcomer an enduring force for muscle fans. Once again Fodrea was involved, and a key aspect of the Muncie redesign involved strengthening the basic design of the T10 so that it could handle more torque without sacrificing the ability to shift smoothly.

Highlights included synchro cones that had been boosted in size, and after the first year of production (1963), a larger front bearing and bearing retainer, with a press-fit bushing for first gear. Over the years the casing would be reinforced, a larger countershaft was added, synchro rings were redesigned, and shifter shafts were changed to a bolt-on design. By the time the Muncie was in its final phase of production (1971-1974) it also gained a 32 spline output shaft in place of the original 27 spline unit.

Initially there were two specific Muncie transmissions available: the M20 wide-ratio (2.56:1 first gear) and the M21 close-ratio (2.20:1 first gear). The latter also offered a 1.64 second, 1.28 third, and direct-drive 1.00 fourth gear, making it the most popular choice for street racers (as a close-ratio design allowed drivers to run through the gears much more quickly while taking maximum advantage of a vehicle's power band).

In 1963, Chevrolet wanted to take the Corvette racing. To do so, it needed an even tougher gearbox than the M21, and while the Grand Sport never made it to Le Mans due to GM politics removing its brands from motorsports competition, the Bowtie brand was able to test the Muncie enough to develop a newer version that eventually hit the streets as the M22.

The M22 'Rock Crusher' featured a one-inch countershaft pin bore and shot-peened gears with aggressive helix angles that reduced heat and stress but also increased noise, leading to the nickname as the transmissions rattled their way down the road. The upside to the racket was the ability to hold even big block torque without worrying about grenading on the starting line.

From 1965-onwards the Rock Crusher was available with the Corvette, and by 1969 it was found on vehicles as diverse as the Chevelle, the Camaro, and the Oldsmobile 442. If a car made big power, chances are a Muncie M22 was on the menu.

Today, all three versions of the Muncie transmission remain a popular choice for both classic car restorations and hot rod builds. There are many different aftermarket companies out there that offer full, custom rebuilds for the M20, M21, and M22, and it's possible to get almost any gear set you want stuffed inside a Muncie casing.

It's also worth noting that Muncie casings are cheap and plentiful in salvage yards if you don't feel like buying new. The GM design is just as strong today as it was nearly 60 years ago, and that makes it the go-to gearbox for Chevy, Olds, Buick, and Pontiac fans looking for a period-correct muscle car transmission.

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chevy transmissions: muncie 4 speed m22 rockcrusher.. - got transmissions got transmissions

Chevy Transmissions: Muncie M22 Rock Crusher 4 Speeds were made From 1965 TO 1974: The most popular transmission of its time for high performance cars built for Chevrolet and all performance oriented G.M cars. They have the same gear ratios as the legendary M21 but with a heavy duty gearset. Well it was not designed so that you could go drag racing on Saturday night or impress girls in front of Burger King by doing massive hole shots. It was primarily designed as a road race transmission. The straighter angle of the gearset produced less heat and less end loading of the gear train. Combined with high impact alloy gears this 4 speed really pushed the limits of its aluminum case in drag race applications. Although the gears are not spur gears ( completely straight ) they still produced a fair amount of gear noise thus the Rockcrusher name. These 4 speeds sound like a blower drive whining. When I owned a 1966 Corvette with the Rat Motor it came with a m22 transmission. After I broke two or three of them, which were all replace by used transmissions, I decided to rebuilt my own unit. So I got a hold of a set of low ratio gears, which were made for drag racing as opposed to road racing, my problem was solved. Of course, once I solved my transmission breakage issues, I developed clutch breakage problems. That is an entire story in itself. Although the M-series transmissions are defunct, plenty of requests come in for used and rebuilt units. There are not any more used Muncie transmissions from that era available without getting lucky. You can buy Muncie transmissions from GotTransmissions.com with high quality American made gears and bearings with a single phone call. The number is 866-320-1182. We have them in stock at affordable prices with an excellent warranty. Call now for immediate delivery.

Chevy Transmissions: Muncie M22 Rock Crusher 4 Speeds were made From 1965 TO 1974: The most popular transmission of its time for high performance cars built for Chevrolet and all performance oriented G.M cars. They have the same gear ratios as the legendary M21 but with a heavy duty gearset.

Well it was not designed so that you could go drag racing on Saturday night or impress girls in front of Burger King by doing massive hole shots. It was primarily designed as a road race transmission. The straighter angle of the gearset produced less heat and less end loading of the gear train. Combined with high impact alloy gears this 4 speed really pushed the limits of its aluminum case in drag race applications. Although the gears are not spur gears ( completely straight ) they still produced a fair amount of gear noise thus the Rockcrusher name. These 4 speeds sound like a blower drive whining.

When I owned a 1966 Corvette with the Rat Motor it came with a m22 transmission. After I broke two or three of them, which were all replace by used transmissions, I decided to rebuilt my own unit. So I got a hold of a set of low ratio gears, which were made for drag racing as opposed to road racing, my problem was solved.

Of course, once I solved my transmission breakage issues, I developed clutch breakage problems. That is an entire story in itself. Although the M-series transmissions are defunct, plenty of requests come in for used and rebuilt units. There are not any more used Muncie transmissions from that era available without getting lucky. You can buy Muncie transmissions from GotTransmissions.com with high quality American made gears and bearings with a single phone call. The number is 866-320-1182. We have them in stock at affordable prices with an excellent warranty. Call now for immediate delivery.

racing muncie slick shift clutch-less super duty m23 super case 4-speed drag racing rock-crusher. summer sale on now!!! - muncie 4 speed transmissions and rebuild kits

Just Released. Yes clutch-less shifting. Severe Duty Slick Shift Clutch-less M23 feature enlarged steel thrust button case assembled modular countershaft clusters with ground drive and gears, unit cage needle bearings, integral countershaft spacer tube and carbonitrided over sized steel hubs. Pro Shift hardened sliders. Small pad Crowned Steel Forks. Welded Shift Shafts. Main drive oil seal input shaft and bearing retainer. 34 tooth 1st super strong 1st gear (stronger that the M22 1st gear). C355 Forged Aluminum mid plate. Lightened main shaft for less rotating mass. The M23 is the strongest Muncie style 4-speed available. CALL FOR SPECIAL SALE PRICING AND RATIO APPLICATION = 262-893-9812 NO CHARGE COMPETITION GEAR POLISHING $150 savings Complete gear polishing serious competition

guide to muncie m20, m21, and m22 four-speed transmissions

Few things excite like the sound and feel of an old-fashioned Chevrolet muscle car and that familiar whine of a classic Muncie four-speed transmission going through the gears. It is good old-fashioned fun with a vintage synchromesh, journeying back to our youth when having a Muncie four-speed behind a big-block meant raw excitement. According to Paul Cangialosi, Muncie transmission historian, technician, and author of Muncie 4-Speed Transmissions: How to rebuild and modify, the Muncie four-speed transmission has its roots back to 1935 and the U.S. patent number 3,088,336 along with an engineer named James W. Fodrea. This patent number, according to Cangialosi, can be found cast into most Muncie four-speed main cases. Fodrea's legacy is far-reaching, extending into popular transmissions around to this day, yet most have no idea who he was.

According to Cangialosi, two companies, Borg and Beck and Warner Gear, merged in 1928 to form BorgWarner. The T-85 three-speed transmission was one result of that merger. The T-10 four-speed was an evolution of the T-85 three-speed transmission, with both of these transmissions being quite similar in appearance. If you've ever looked at a BorgWarner T-10 and a Muncie four-speed and gotten them mixed up, you are not alone because the Muncie (M20, M21, and M22) is a direct descendant of the T-10 according to Cangialosi. The Saginaw four-speed box is quite similar to both the T-10 and Muncie four-speed transmissions. However, neither compares to the Muncie in terms of strength.

That the Muncie has much in common with the T-10 is no accident. It was a matter of economics when Chevrolet needed a four-speed manual transmission for the Corvette in the mid-1950s. According to Cangialosi, GM took the basic T-10 design and beefed it up to conceive the Muncie M20 and M21 four-speed transmissions, which arrived in 1963.

GM's goal with the Muncie four-speed was to produce a better shift employing larger synchro cones. He tells us both the M20 wide-ratio and M21 close-ratio transmissions were first offered in 1963. The M22 Rock Crusher would come later to accommodate the heavy twist of Chevrolet's big-blocks in the mid-1960s.

The M20 and M21 transmissions produced from 1963-'74 are easy to identify in both wide- and close-ratio units. The M22 to come later in 1967-'74 is also a close-ratio unit, but much stronger than the M21, with a higher torque capacity.

Because the Muncie has so much in common with the T-10 and even similar Saginaw boxes, it is easy to get this guy mixed up with non-Muncie units. Although the Muncie's bloodline goes way back, this legendary gearbox entered service for the Chevrolet Division in 1963. In fact, 1963 is a standalone year because changes in this box came almost immediately for 1964, beginning with the front bearing retainer, which was aluminum for 1963 and became cast-iron in 1964. The bearing bore size was also one year only with a #6207-style input shaft bearing, according to Cangialosi.

The early production Muncie four-speed case is the small-bore unit and can be identified by the GM casting number 3831704 (see Muncie M20/M21/M22 Main Case Identification chart). The large-bore Muncie came into production in 1964-'65 and became the standard from then on through the end of production in 1974. What makes the small-bore and large-bore case Muncies different is the input shaft bearing size and first gear, which rode on the mainshaft void of a bushing for 1963. For 1964 and beyond, it rode on a bushing between it and the mainshaft.

Cangialosi explains there were two basic mainshafts produced for the M20, M21, and M22 transmissions (see Input Shaft Identification chart). From 1963-'70, the Muncie was fitted with a 27-spline mainshaft and must have the corresponding slip yoke. For 1971-'74, a larger diameter, 32-spline mainshaft was employed along with the corresponding yoke. Because this mainshaft is larger, you're also going to need larger bushings and seals. Keep this in mind when you're searching for a Muncie transmission.

What you will find in your search for the right Muncie four-speed is conflicting information from different sources. Before you here are the basics of Muncie M20, M21, and M22 four-speed transmissions. Glean the basics and use them in your research. Expect to find various combinations out there because these high-performance four-speed transmissions have been thrashed, trashed, and rebuilt through the decades. You're going to find various combinations of main cases, tailshaft housings, and side covers coupled with variations inside of each case. Pure dumb luck will lead you to a completely unmolested Muncie.

One more way to identify the Muncie is via stamped codes in the case, which indicate when the transmission was built at Muncie (see How To Read Muncie Build Date Codes chart). According to Cangialosi, the date was based on model year, not necessarily the calendar year.

Of course, restorers and rebuilders will tend to re-stamp the date code to suit a particular restoration. This can add confusion to what you've found. Muncie transmissions also tend to get performance improvements such as a gear ratio change and stronger internal parts. This is when you have to remove the side cover to see what's inside. Examine the input and output shafts to see if you've found the box you want.

And finally, if forced to choose between a Muncie or the BorgWarner T-10, it is suggested you choose the Muncie due to its brute strength. The Muncie was originally a stronger alternative to the T-10 and Super T-10 because it could take the torque. If you find an M22, you have the ultimate Muncie designed for the high torque of a big-block that will bolt to your small-block.