ottawa high quality medium coal magnetic separator

reliable magnetic separator for all industries_hengji magnet

Hengji, a professional manufacturer and distributor of magnetic separators, providing high quality products directly to contractors, relevant magnetic separators industry and other companies around the world. No matter they need a standard magnetic separator. when the opposite size of the base material is inaccessible, they will find the solution at Hengji.

Fast open design structure, easy to clean and install.The maximum magnetic field can reach 12000 GS.The number of magnetic rods can be adjusted according to material characteristics.Rotating magnetic rods can prevent material from clogging.

Installed in the assembly line,The materials dry, flowing , powdery. Application areas: food ,plastic, chemical, ceramics,pharmaceuticals, glass and so on Automatic tramp iron disposal,Fully sealed structure design.

It might be hard to imagine the world without magnetic separatorto. Hengji provides full ranges of magnetic separatorto suit your different industry applications, ranging from CERAMIC, FOOD PROCESSING, COAL/POWER STATION, RECYCLING, MINING, CEMENTPROCESSING , PLASTIC/RUBBER areas as shown below:

Reliable products Each and every magnetic separator is made from quality material under strict quality control. In addition, these products are gone through strict quality test before shipping. What Hengji does is to ensure the Magnetic separatoryou bought will perform meet even beyond your requirements.

Rich varieties Hengji provides the largest selections of magnetic separator, automatic magnetic separator and rotary magnetic separator on the website. The characteristics of energy saving and environmental protection, as well as complete equipment models and styles for users in different industries to choose.

Affordable price All the Magnetic separatorsupplied by Hengji are high quality, yet at competitive prices. As the largest magnetic separator manufacturer, Hengji can buy the same material at a lower price. Meanwhile, located Shandong, China, Hengji is near to coal and iron factories for a lower transportation cost. And we transfer these savings to our clients by providing a more affordable price.

Professional service Hengji has professional service team waiting on line for answering all your questions about the products and reply your email as soon as possible. In addition, Hengji's specialists are available to help you select the magnetic separator you desired for specific applications.

CQZ full-automatic online magnetic separator is installed in the assembly line to realize online real-time automatic removal of iron in materials. The automatic timing controller can be set as continuous automatic real-time cleaning, and the cleaning time

CTZ half magnetic drum with medium magnetic Intensity (the structure of CTZ type magnetic drum with medium magnetic Intensity is the same as the parameters of RCT type), mostly used for the purification of powder, granular, small pie

Fast open design structure, easy to clean and install. The maximum magnetic field can reach 12 000 GS. The number of magnetic rods can be adjusted according to material characteristics. Rotating magnetic rods can prevent material from clogging.

RSSCopyright @Weifang Hengji Magnetoelectric Machinery Co., LtdAdd: No. 2798 Yongjun Road, Weicheng District, Weifang City, Shandong Province, China Telephone: (Bright Han); (Ms mu) E-mail: [email protected], [email protected] Links: magnetic separator, de-ironing separator, self-cleaning magnetic separator , permanent Magnet, remove iron, iron contamination, coal iron separate, waste recycling, magnetic separator web1, magnetic separator web2 , magnetic separator web3

magnetic pulley (bm) - magnetix

CloseUsing the website (www.magnetix.com.pl) means acceptance of the terms contained in the privacy policy. In particular, this applies to the acceptance of the processing and storage of personal data collected through this Site and used for marketing and commercial purposes. This website uses cookies collected for statistical purposes and used for the proper operation of the website. Conditions for storage or access cookies, you can change your browser settings - failure to change the browser settings, you consent to the saving.

magnetic separator - an overview | sciencedirect topics

As magnetic separators progress toward larger capacity, higher efficiency, and lower operating costs, some subeconomic iron ores have been utilized in recent years. For example, magnetite iron ore containing only about 4% Fe (beach sands or ancient beach sands) to 15% Fe (iron ore formations) and oxidized iron ore of only about 10% Fe (previously mine waste) to 20% Fe (oxidized iron ore formations) are reported to be utilized. They are first crushed and the coarse particles pretreated using roll magnetic separators. The magnetic product of roll magnetic separators may reach 2540% Fe and then is fed to mineral processing plants.

As shown in Figure5, slurry is fed from the top of an inclined screen in a low-intensity magnetic field, with the mesh size of screen sufficiently larger than those of particles in slurry. As the slurry flows down the above surface of screen, magnetic particles agglomerate with the size of agglomerations increasingly growing and roll down as magnetic concentrate at the lower end of screen. The less- or nonmagnetic particles pass through the screen as tailings. Figure5 shows the operation of screen magnetic separators for cleaning of magnetite.

Commercial magnetic separators are continuous-process machines, and separation is carried out on a moving stream of particles passing into and through the magnetic field. Close control of the speed of passage of the particles through the field is essential, which typically rules out free fall as a means of feeding. Belts or drums are very often used to transport the feed through the field.

As discussed in Section 13.4.1, flocculation of magnetic particles is a concern in magnetic separators, especially with dry separators processing fine material. If the ore can be fed through the field in a monolayer, this effect is much less serious, but, of course, the capacity of the machine is drastically reduced. Flocculation is often minimized by passing the material through consecutive magnetic fields, which are usually arranged with successive reversals of the polarity. This causes the particles to turn through 180, each reversal tending to free the entrained gangue particles. The main disadvantage of this method is that flux tends to leak from pole to pole, reducing the effective field intensity.

Provision for collection of the magnetic and nonmagnetic fractions must be incorporated into the design of the separator. Rather than allow the magnetics to contact the pole-pieces, which then requires their detachment, most separators are designed so that the magnetics are attracted to the pole-pieces, but come into contact with some form of conveying device, which carries them out of the influence of the field, into a bin or a belt. Nonmagnetic disposal presents no problems; free fall from a conveyor into a bin is often used. Middlings are readily produced by using a more intense field after the removal of the highly magnetic fraction.

Conventional magnetic separators are largely confined to the separation or filtration of relatively large particles of strongly magnetic materials. They employ a single surface for separation or collection of magnetic particles. A variety of transport mechanisms are employed to carry the feed past the magnet and separate the magnetic products. The active separation volume for each of these separators is approximately the product of the area of the magnetised surface and the extent of the magnetic field. In order for the separators to have practical throughputs, the magnetic field must extend several centimetres. Such an extent implies a relatively low magnetic field gradient and weak magnetic forces.

To overcome these disadvantages HGMS has been developed. Matrices of ferromagnetic material are used to produce much stronger but shorter range magnetic forces over large surface areas. When the matrices are placed in a magnetic field, strong magnetic forces are developed adjacent to the filaments of the matrix in approximately inverse proportion to their diameter. Since the extent of the magnetic field is approximately equal to the diameter of the filaments the magnetic fields are relatively short range. However, the magnetic field produced is intense and permits the separation and trapping of very fine, weakly magnetic particles (Oberteuffer, 1979).

The transport medium for HGMS can be either liquid or gaseous. Dry HGMS processing has the advantage of a dry product although classification of the pulverised coal is required to ensure proper separation. Small particles tend to agglomerate and pass through the separator. It has been shown that individual particles of coal in the discharge of a power plant pulveriser flow freely and hence separate well only if the material below about 10 m is removed (Eissenberg et al., 1979). Even then drying of that part of run of mine coal to be treated by HGMS may be required to ensure good flow characteristics.

A schematic representation of a batch HGMS process is shown in Figure 11.5 (Hise, 1979, 1980; Hise et al., 1979). It consists of a solenoid, the core cavity of which is filled with an expanded metal mesh. Crushed coal is fed to the top of the separator. Clean coal passes through while much of the inorganic material is trapped to be released when the solenoid is later deactivated.

Data from a batch HGMS process of one size fraction of one coal are plotted in Figure 11.6 as weight per cent of material trapped in the magnetic matrix, the product sulphur and the product ash versus the independent variable of superficial transport velocity. At low superficial transport velocities the amount of material removed from the coal is high partly due to mechanical entrapment. As the velocity is increased the importance of this factor diminishes but hydrodynamic forces on the particles increase. These hydrodynamic forces oppose the magnetic force and the amount of material removed from the coal decreases (Hise, 1979).

For comparison, Figure 11.7 shows data from a specific gravity separation of the same size fraction of the same coal. While the sulphur contents of the products from the two separation processes are similar the ash content of the HGMS product is considerably higher than that of the specific gravity product. It should be emphasised that this comparison was made for one size fraction of one coal.

More recently dry HGMS has been demonstrated at a scale of 1 t/h on carousel type equipment which processes coal continuously (Figure 11.8; Hise et al., 1981). A metal mesh passes continuously through the magnetised cavity so that the product coal passes through while the trapped inorganics are carried out of the field and released separately.

Wet HGMS is able to treat a much wider range of coal particle sizes than dry HGMS. The efficiency of separation increases with decreasing particle size. However, depending on the end use a considerable quantity of energy may have to be expended in drying the wet, fine coal product. Wet HGMS may find particular application to the precleaning of coal for use in preparing coal water mixtures for subsequent combustion as both pulverising the coal to a fine particle size and transporting the coal in a water slurry are operations common to both processes.

Work at Bruceton, PA, USA has compared the pyrite reduction potential of froth flotation followed by wet HGMS with that of a two stage froth flotation process (Hucko and Miller, 1980). Typical results are shown in Figures 11.9 and 11.10. The reduction in pyritic sulphur is similar in each case although a greater reduction in ash content is achieved by froth flotation followed by HGMS than by two stage froth flotation. However, Hucko (1979) concludes that it is highly unlikely that HGMS would be used for coal preparation independently of other beneficiation processes. As with froth flotation there is considerable variation in the amenability of various coals to magnetic beneficiation.

In the magnetic separator, material is passed through the field of an electromagnet which causes the retention or retardation of the magnetic constituent. It is important that the material should be supplied as a thin sheet in order that all the particles are subjected to a field of the same intensity and so that the free movement of individual particles is not impeded. The two main types of equipment are:

Eliminators, which are used for the removal of small quantities of magnetic material from the charge to a plant. These are frequently employed, for example, for the removal of stray pieces of scrap iron from the feed to crushing equipment. A common type of eliminator is a magnetic pulley incorporated in a belt conveyor so that the non-magnetic material is discharged in the normal manner and the magnetic material adheres to the belt and falls off from the underside.

Concentrators, which are used for the separation of magnetic ores from the accompanying mineral matter. These may operate with dry or wet feeds and an example of the latter is the Mastermag wet drum separator, the principle of operation of which is shown in Figure 1.43. An industrial machine is shown in operation in Figure 1.44. A slurry containing the magnetic component is fed between the rotating magnet drum cover and the casing. The stationary magnet system has several radial poles which attract the magnetic material to the drum face, and the rotating cover carries the magnetic material from one pole to another, at the same time gyrating the magnetic particles, allowing the non-magnetics to fall back into the slurry mainstream. The clean magnetic product is discharged clear of the slurry tailings. Operations can be co- or counter-current and the recovery of magnetic material can be as high as 99.5 per cent.

An example of a concentrator operating on a dry feed is a rotating disc separator. The material is fed continuously in a thin layer beneath a rotating magnetic disc which picks up the magnetic material in the zone of high magnetic intensity. The captured particles are carried by the disc to the discharge chutes where they are released. The nonmagnetic material is then passed to a second magnetic separation zone where secondary separation occurs in the same way, leaving a clean non-magnetic product to emerge from the discharge end of the machine. A Mastermagnet disc separator is shown in Figure 1.45.

The removal of small quantities of finely dispersed ferromagnetic materials from fine minerals, such as china clay, may be effectively carried out in a high gradient magnetic field. The suspension of mineral is passed through a matrix of ferromagnetic wires which is magnetised by the application of an external magnetic field. The removal of the weakly magnetic particles containing iron may considerably improve the brightness of the mineral, and thereby enhance its value as a coating or filler material for paper, or for use in the manufacture of high quality porcelain. In cases where the magnetic susceptibility of the contaminating component is too low, adsorption may first be carried out on to the surface of a material with the necessary magnetic properties. The magnetic field is generated in the gap between the poles of an electromagnet into which a loose matrix of fine stainless steel wire, usually of voidage of about 0.95, is inserted.

The attractive force on a particle is proportional to its magnetic susceptibility and to the product of the field strength and its gradient, and the fine wire matrix is used to minimise the distance between adjacent magnetised surfaces. The attractive forces which bind the particles must be sufficiently strong to ensure that the particles are not removed by the hydrodynamic drag exerted by the flowing suspension. As the deposit of separated particles builds up, the capture rate progressively diminishes and, at the appropriate stage, the particles are released by reducing the magnetic field strength to zero and flushing out with water. Commercial machines usually have two reciprocating canisters, in one of which particles are being collected from a stream of suspension, and in the other released into a waste stream. The dead time during which the canisters are being exchanged may be as short as 10 s.

Magnetic fields of very high intensity may be obtained by the use of superconducting magnets which operate most effectively at the temperature of liquid helium, and conservation of both gas and cold is therefore of paramount importance. The reciprocating canister system employed in the china clay industry is described by Svarovsky(30) and involves the use a single superconducting magnet and two canisters. At any time one is in the magnetic field while the other is withdrawn for cleaning. The whole system needs delicate magnetic balancing so that the two canisters can be moved without the use of very large forces and, for this to be the case, the amount of iron in the magnetic field must be maintained at a constant value throughout the transfer process. The superconducting magnet then remains at high field strength, thereby reducing the demand for liquid helium.

Micro-organisms can play an important role in the removal of certain heavy metal ions from effluent solutions. In the case of uranyl ions which are paramagnetic, the cells which have adsorbed the ions may be concentrated using a high gradient magnetic separation process. If the ions themselves are not magnetic, it may be possible to precipitate a magnetic deposit on the surfaces of the cells. Some micro-organisms incorporate a magnetic component in their cellular structure and are capable of taking up non-magnetic pollutants and are then themselves recoverable in a magnetic field. Such organisms are referred to a being magnetotactic.

where mpap is the inertial force and ap the acceleration of the particle. Fi are all the forces that may be present in a magnetic separator, such as the magnetic force, force of gravity, hydrodynamic drag, centrifugal force, the friction force, surface forces, magnetic dipolar forces, and electrostatic forces among the particles, and others.

Workable models of particle motion in a magnetic separator and material separation must be developed separately for individual types of magnetic separators. The situation is complicated by the fact that many branches of magnetic separation, such as separation by suspended magnets, magnetic pulleys, or wet low-intensity drum magnetic separators still constitute highly empirical technology. Hesitant steps have been taken to develop theoretical models of dry separation in roll and drum magnetic separators. Alternatively, open-gradient magnetic separation, magnetic flocculation of weakly magnetic particles, and wet high-gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) have received considerable theoretical attention. A notable number of papers dealing with the problem of particle capture in HGMS led to an understanding of the interaction between a particle and a matrix element. However, completely general treatment of the magnetostatic and hydrodynamic behavior of an assembly of the material particles in a system of matrix elements, in the presence of a strong magnetic field, is a theoretical problem of considerable complexity which has not been completed, yet. Detailed description of particle behavior in various magnetic separators can be found in monographs by Gerber and Birss (1983) and Svoboda (1987, 2004).

The brick material ratio was: Slag(1.0mm<): Grog (3.0mm<): Ceramic Gravel (1.0mm<): Clay (1.0mm<) at 20 : 35 : 25 : 20. To this mixture, 2% of pigment were added. Kneading and blending was done by a Mller mixer for 15 minutes. Molding was done by a 200 ton friction press, and the bricks were loaded onto the sintering truck.

This paper presents preliminary results using the Magnetic Micro-Particle Separator, (MM-PS, patent pending) which was conceived for high throughput isothermal and isobaric separation of nanometer (nm) sized iron catalyst particles from Fischer-Tropsch wax at 260 oC. Using magnetic fields up to 2,000 gauss, F-T wax with 0.30.5 wt% solids was produced from 25 wt% solids F-T slurries at product rates up to 230 kg/min/m2. The upper limit to the filtration rate is unknown at this time. The test flow sheet is given and preliminary results of a scale-up of 50:1 are presented.

Most loads for flap valves, conveyors, vibrating feeders, crushers, paddle feeders, magnetic separators, fans and trash screens generally are supplied at 415 V three-phase 50 Hz from the 415 V Coal Plant Switchboard, although 3.3 kV supplies may be used when the duty demands. Stacker/reclaimer machines are supplied at 3.3 kV. Electrical distribution is designed to safeguard the independent operational requirements of the duplicated coal plant facilities and to ensure that an electrical fault will not result in the total loss of coal supplies to the boilers.

The first step in any form of scrubbing unit is to break the lumpy materials and remove tramp elements by a magnetic separator. The product is then led into the scrubbing unit. The dry scrubbing principle is to agitate the sand grains in a stream of air so that the particles shot-blast each other. A complete dry scrubbing plant has been described in a previous book of this library in connection with sodium silicate bonded sands.* For clay-bonded sands the total AFS clay content in the reclaimed sand varies from 05% to 25% clay depending on the design of the plant.

an analysis of medium losses in coal washing plants - sciencedirect

A major operating cost in dense-medium separation is in replacement of lost medium solids. The loss of medium solids, being costly, plays a crucial role in determining the economics of any preparation operation. Coal washeries that employ dense-medium cyclones often attempt optimization of the processes by varying the vortex or the spigot diameter and the feed relative density. While these changes help in closer control of the separation process, they also result in medium losses due to changes in the medium split ratio (ratio of the medium flow rate in overflow to underflow). Since medium solids are lost by adhesion to products and as magnetic separator effluent, the effect of the change in medium split ratio on the drain-and-rinse screens and, hence, the magnetic separator circuit needs to be studied. In Tata Steel's coal washeries, at Jharkhand India, which employs primary and secondary dense-medium cyclones in series to produce clean coal, middlings and rejects, reducing the relative density of feed medium, had an insignificant effect on the medium split ratio. On the other hand, changing the cone ratio (ratio of the overflow diameter to the underflow diameter) changed the relative density and the flow rates through the cyclone outlets, thus affecting the performance of the magnetite recovery circuit.

A systematic study through laboratory tests and a detailed plant sampling campaign helped in identifying the causes of magnetite loss. Upon implementation of the recommendations, the magnetite losses decreased, resulting in a saving of approximately US$27,500 per annum. The study also helped in evolving some checkpoints for plant operators for identifying magnetite losses.

heavy media drum separators | multotec

The Multotec Heavy Media Drum Separator (HMDS) improves grade and recovery in dense medium recovery processes. Multotec improves the performance of dense media mineral recovery operations through combining internationally-leading Permax technology, an established application- and context-specific experience in mineral processing and trusted, high-quality configurations, materials and parts. As the pioneers of the use of rare-earth magnets in wet low intensity magnetic drum separators, the Multotec HMDS utilise Ferrite Boron (FeB) magnets to increase magnetic induction values from the conventional 2 000 nominal Gauss to 2 500 or 3 000 Gauss, allowing a stronger attraction of dense media for a more efficient recovery process. Our HMDS range is supplied in standard drum sizes of a 400 mm to 1 200 mm diameter, with widths from 0.600 m to 3.000 m with optional manifolds and launderers with plug-and-play capabilities. Our range is supplied in standard drum and high gradient design.

Our trusted Permax high gradient design generates high force factors that guarantee medium recovery in the toughest of applications with magnetic flux densities of up to 2 300 Gauss on the magnet surface.