rocks mines in jordan

malheur & owyhee rockhounding sites - eastern oregon - oregon discovery

Rocks & Minerals: Thunderegg, Jasper, Agate, Leaf Fossils, Petrified Wood Tools: Rock hammers, picks, and shovels County: Malheur Managed: Oregon State Park and BLM Road Access: From Adrian - almost any vehicle; From Jordan Valley - a high-clearance vehicle is recommended. Wet weather conditions make Succor Creek Road impassable. Locations: Succor Creek State Natural Area, Succor Creek Canyon, near Rockville School

Succor Creek State Natural Area. From Adrian, take OR 201 south and follow 8.5 miles. Turn right onto Succor Creek Road and continue 15.5 miles to the destination. From Jordan Valley, follow 27 miles via US 95 north, turn left onto Mc Bridge Road in Idaho and go 8.5 miles to Succor Creek Road in Oregon, turn right and then again right, drive 11.5 miles onto Succor Creek Road to the destination.

The scenic rocky Succor Creek Canyon is known as a rockhound's paradise. The official state rock of Oregon, thunder eggs, filled with agates and other minerals, can be found in the Succor Creek State Natural Area.Cross the bridge and search on the hillside and gravel deposits along the creek. This deposit is a very large and, typically, thunder eggsare averagely sized up to apple. But some of the specimens can exceed hundreds of pounds! Typically, they are mostly filled with white and clear agate with inclusions of black dendrites, green moss or golden plume.Limited souvenir collecting is permitted in the State Park area.

At the site near Rockville School, you can find thundereggs, petrified wood, agate, andJasper. There are other productive rockhounding sites along Succor Creek Canyon, where you can find petrified wood, agate, jasper, picture jasper, and fossils.

From Jordan Valley, follow 27 miles via US 95 north, turn left onto Mc Bridge Road in Idaho and go 8.5 miles to Succor Creek Road in Oregon. Turn right and then again right, drive 1.5 miles to Leslie Gulch Road, turn left and follow next 14.2 miles to the destination.

Rocks & Minerals: Petrified wood Tools: Rock hammers, picks, and shovels County: Malheur Managed: BLM Road Access: A high-clearance vehicle is recommended. Wet weather conditions make the road impassable.

From Harper, take US20 east and drive for about 14.4 miles to Rock Canyon Road. Turn south onto Bishop Road and after 1.2 miles turn right onto Rock Canyon Road and go for 17.6 miles. Continue straight (ignore the two left branches), after 0.6 miles go slight left and follow 0.9 miles to the destination on the right.

Rocks & Minerals: Agate, Jasper, Geode, Petrified Wood Tools: Rock hammers, picks, and shovels County: Malheur Managed: BLM Road Access: A high-clearance vehicle is recommended; wet weather conditions make the road impassable.

This site is located 6.5 miles south of Negro Rock. Drive from Negro Rock 1 mile southeast to Twin Springs Road, turn right and continue 5.5 miles to the Twin Springs Campground on the left. From Nyssa, take OR 201 south and drive about 8 miles to Owyhee Avenue.Turn left onto Mitchell Butte Road and go 1.9 miles, turn left onto P Line, continue 3.4 miles onto P Line/Chalk Butte. Turn left and go onto Shell Rock for 2.9 miles to the fork, take right branch for next 2.4 miles to Twin Springs Road. Turn left and continue 12.7 miles to Twin Springs Campground on the left.

Rocks & Minerals: Petrified Wood, Agate, Jasper Tools: Rock hammers, picks, and shovels County: Malheur Managed: BLM Road Access: A high-clearance vehicle is recommended; wet weather conditions make the road impassable.

From Nyssa, take OR 201 south and drive about 8 miles to Owyhee Avenue.Turn left onto Mitchell Butte Road and go about 8 miles to Haystack Rock Road, continue next 1.4 miles. This site has long been a favorite destination among rock collectors. Numbers of rockhound trails will bring you to collecting sites.

From Burns or Juntura, drive onto US20 to Beulah Road (the western end of Juntura). Turn north ontoBeulah Road and drive 14.5 miles to Agency Mountain Road (the south edge of the reservoir). Turn left ontoAgency Mountain Road and cross the dam. The parking area is on the right.

The beautiful Beulah Reservoir near a small town of Juntura is famous for its great fossilized leaves. Here also you can findfish fossils, agate, and jasper. The collecting site is located on the southeastern shore of the reservoir.

Rocks & Minerals: Mostly Jasper Tools: Rock hammers, picks, and shovels County: Malheur Managed: BLM Road Access: A high-clearance vehicle is recommended. Wet weather conditions make the road impassable. Locations: Agate Hills, Agate Flat, Cottonwood Spring, White Hill, Gopher Holes Agate Hill. From McDermit, follow west onto Cordero Mine Road for 4.3 miles and then turn onto Disaster Pick Road. Continue onto Disaster Pick Road west for 4 miles. Take a dirt way just before the cattle guard and drive uphill for next 0.3 miles or leave your car downhill.

The hilly areas near the town of McDermitton the Oregon side have numerous productive rockhounding sites. There are several petrified wooddeposits including Agate Flat, Cottonwood Spring, WhiteHill, and Gopher Holes. White and tan agates with black dendrites can be found on Agate Hill. Agatized wood can be collected at the Agate Flat site. Opalized wood is found at the Cottonwood Spring site.

From US-95, between mileposts 117 and 118 (51 miles south of US-95/OR-78 junction or 4.5 miles north of McDermitt), turn west onto Easterday Road (Hot Springs Road) and drive 1.2 miles. Bear right, just before a ranch, and continue 0.3 miles to the gate. Open and close the gate, then continue 0.3 miles to the fork. On the fork, bear right and continue 0.6 miles to the mine.

Rocks & Minerals: Plum and Moss Agate, Angel Wing Agate Tools: Rock hammers, picks, and shovels County: Owyhee | Malheur Managed: BLM Road Access: A high-clearance vehicle is recommended; wet weather conditions make the road impassable Locations: Graveyard Point Marker, Sage Road.

Graveyard Point Marker. From Homedale in Idaho, take US95 south and drive 2.5 miles to Graveyard Point Road. Turn right onto Graveyard Point Road and drive 4.5 miles then turn left and you will see a footbridge.Park your car, walk across the bridge. The trail will bring you to the collecting area.

Sage Road. From Homedale in Idaho, take US 95 south and drive 2.5 miles to Graveyard Point Road. Turn right onto Graveyard Point Road and drive 3.9 miles, and then turn left onto Sage Road. Continue onto Sage Road for 0.9 miles to the bridge, cross the canal and take the second left branch. Find the parking area.

Graveyard Point rockhounding sites are known for excellent plum agates with pink yellow, and red inclusions. Moss, dendritic, angelwing and other varieties of agate can be found here as well. Beware of private claims.

The Oregon Rockhounding Map provides information about some of the many rockhounding sites of the state of Oregon. Information is subject to change at any time, and Oregon Discovery team cannot guarantee that is either current or correct. Be aware that there are some mine claims and private lands near the public collecting areas. Determining the land status and minerals' collection rules at the site is your primary responsibility.

Navigation Link*** Navigation to the parking area. Sometimes Google Map does not provide correct directions, especially in the forest or mountain areas. Check this website for driving directions before you leave.

DISCLAIMER: This websiteor the contributor have made great efforts to provide accurate, complete and detailed information. Due to this information is subject to change at any time, the Oregon Discovery team cannot guarantee that is either current or correct. This website visitors assume full responsibility for any use of this information and are encouraged to contact local agencies directly to inquire about the most up-to-date information and regulations.

major mines & projects | al khabra mine

The deposit is limited by the Hail arch complex in the east, Wadi Sirhan, Quraymiz area in the South, and Iraqi and Jordanian borders in the north and the west.In the Al Khabra area, the Arqah Phosphorite member is repeatedly exposed by the set of northwest trending faults. The member varies in thickness from 1.3 metres to 5.6 metres and averages 3.09 metres. The phosphates layers comprise an original succession of carbonate-cemented sub-cycles, now represented by friable, semi-friable and residual carbonate-cemented phosphorite. Graded bedding is ubiquitous; with the pelletal grain size decreasing upwards in successive sub-cycles (fining upwards). Occasional barren limestone and chert interbeds are documented within the phosphorite sequence.

Al Khabra is an open pit mine producing phosphate ore for processing into phosphate concentrate.Conventional truck and shovel with drilling and blasting has been selected for the majority of the mining operation, but includes a component of ripping in waste material of thickness less than 3m. This method is expected to bring operational efficiency, best selectivity, and low dilution factors. Waste rock is used to progressively backfill the mine void.

Run of mine rock with a maximum size of 150mm is conveyed to the beneficiation plant and is screened and sorted to remove chert which is discharged to the tailings storage facility. An optical sorter and X-ray transmission (XRT) sorter are employed to remove siliceous material, which is also discharged to the TSF. These sorting techniques contribute to improved water and energy efficiency in mining industries, by ensuring waste materials are removed, rather than proceeding through the process for treatment. Non chert material is discharged into the secondary crushing circuit (impact crushers) and the crushed product is re-cycled back over the pre-screen to deliver a uniform size to a blended ore stockpile.Dust collector systems will extract dust, which is filtered through a dust collection filter, with the clean air being vented to atmosphere. Periodic pulse air is used to knock the dust particles off the dust collection filter. The dust particles fall into the dust collection silo through a rotary valve, which ensures a vacuum pressure is maintained within the dust extraction system. The dust collection silo will be periodically emptied by a vacuum truck. Additionally, process water is sprayed on the blended ore stockpile to control dust.The blended ore is fed into blade mills with process water, to form a slurry, which is screened and ground to separate slimes. The purpose of the Blade Mill is not to break the ore down in size, but to break up the mud and clays and clean the rocks surface. A dust collector system is included here also. Hydrosizer units are used to achieve size classification by using up-flow water flow to remove finer smaller particles from the slurry. Water is drained from the sized material and de-watered sized ore tested to determine the grade of the sized material. If it meets the required grade it is milled/washed and pumped to the Phosphoric acid plant. If it fails to meet the required grade it is milled and sent to a flotation circuit.

Dry ScreeningDewateringAcid plantSulfuric acid (reagent)CalciningOre sorter (XRT & EM)Filter press plantReverse osmosisPurification & crystallizationDeslimingSolvent ExtractionFlotationCarbon adsorptionX-Ray Transmission (XRT) sorting

Oversize material undergoes further grinding, milling, crushing. If the sized material meets the required grade specification it will be pumped to the concentrate tank, if not it will be pumped to the de-slime cyclones from which underflow is directed to the floatation process, while overflow is thickened using flocculant before being dewatered.The beneficiation plant uses open circuit reverse flotation whereby the gangue minerals (silica and carbonate) are floated and the phosphate mineral is depressed reporting out the bottom of the last cell. Flotation reagents (amine, sulphonated fatty acid and phosphoric acid) and process water are added before the slurry is fed to one of the six floatation trains. Froth from the floatation circuit gravitates to the tailings thickener, and the concentrate flows out from the bottom of the last cell into a pump hopper.The concentrate is pumped to thickening cyclones located above the belt filter plant. Thickening cyclone unde ........

rock & mineral collecting - central oregon rockhounding - oregon discovery

Central Oregon just east of the Cascade Mountains is known to be a popular rock and mineral collecting area. Productive sites of Crook, Jefferson, and Deschutes Counties offer a variety of gem-quality minerals including famous thundereggs, petrified wood, limb cast, agate, jasper, and opal. Opal is found at Opal Butte in Morrow County but this area is closed to public diggings.

A wide variety of minerals, semiprecious gemstones, and rocks is available on public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and U.S. Forest Service. Also, there are privately owned mines, open to the public for fee digging. There may be private claims in some areas. Check it before you go.

Here is a list of the most popular sites, available for recreational rockhounding. But before accessing the sites and collecting any rocks, contact the local government agency to find out the most up-to-date information and regulations.

From Prineville, head southwest via Highway 380 to a free standing Eagle Rock, between milepost 14 and 15, and turn right just beyond the rock. Pass the cattle guard and turn left. Travel on a gravel road 1 miles to a fork. Bear right and go 0.4 miles to the next split of the road. Take a left and park your car. Hike up the hill 0.3 miles to the collection site. The Eagle Rock area produces beautiful but scarce red and black plume, dendritic, moss agate in a rhyolite base.

The Oregon Rockhounding Map provides information about some of the many rockhounding sites of the state of Oregon. Information is subject to change at any time, and Oregon Discovery team cannot guarantee that is either current or correct. Be aware that there are some mine claims and private lands near the public collecting areas. Determining the land status and minerals' collection rules at the site is your primary responsibility.

Navigation Link*** Navigation to the parking area. Sometimes Google Map does not provide correct directions, especially in the forest or mountain areas. Check this website for driving directions before you leave.

DISCLAIMER: This websiteor the contributor have made great efforts to provide accurate, complete and detailed information. Due to this information is subject to change at any time, the Oregon Discovery team cannot guarantee that is either current or correct. This website visitors assume full responsibility for any use of this information and are encouraged to contact local agencies directly to inquire about the most up-to-date information and regulations.

fluorescent rocks of sterling hill mine ogdensburg, new jersey - atlas obscura

Formerly pale, flat, unlit rocks and minerals turn vibrant orange, pink, and green when the overhead lights are turned out and the black-light turned on. They streak with red or develop otherworldly glowing veins of light that were definitely not visible before.

These are the glowing, fluorescent rocks of the Sterling Hill Mining Museum, and the museum has hundreds of them, making it home to the largest publicly displayed collection of fluorescent rocks in the world.

The museum was started by brothers Richard and Robert Hauck in 1990 in the shuttered Sterling Hill zinc mine, which had closed three years earlier. The mine was one of the oldest in the United States and began operation around 1739, and over its lifespan, it produced more than 11 million tons of zinc ore. When it closed, it was the last operating mine in the state of New Jersey.

Today the mine welcomes thousands of visitors into its depth each year to witness, among other things, its striking collection of more than 700 fluorescent objects. These objectsall able to glow under ultraviolet light, X-rays, or electron beamsillustrate a phenomenon that should be pretty familiar to anyone whos had a black-light poster. The displays feature minerals, fossils, crystals, glass, fabric, and concrete, among others, all lit by ultraviolet light to show their glowing qualities.

In 1999, the museum created a special wing known as the Thomas S. Warren Museum of Fluorescence to house its glowing collection. It is named in honor of Thomas S. Warren, an ultraviolet researcher, and designer of the mineralight, a portable black-light lamp. The mine was placed on both the New Jersey Register of Historic Places and the National Register of Historic Places in 1991.

The public tour operating schedule changes with the seasons. You cannot go into either the museums or the mine without being a part of a tour. There are no unguided tours.From July through August, tours are daily at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. In September, they run Monday through Friday at 1 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. From October through November they run daily at 1 p.m. December through March they run on weekends at 1 p.m. From April to June, they run daily at 1 p.m.

From July through August, tours are daily at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. In September, they run Monday through Friday at 1 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. From October through November they run daily at 1 p.m. December through March they run on weekends at 1 p.m. From April to June, they run daily at 1 p.m.

Atlas Obscura and our trusted partners use technology such as cookies on our website to personalise ads, support social media features, and analyse our traffic. Please click below to consent to the use of this technology while browsing our site. To learn more or withdraw consent, please visit our cookie policy.

a list of minerals and gemstones found in oregon! - rock seeker

Oregon is rich in geological history. And its this rich history that makes Oregon one of the top rockhounding destinations in the United States. While other popular rockhounding states like Arizona and New Mexico have carved out a reputation for themselves in the world of rock collecting, Oregon is the silent competitor when it comes to accessibility to dig sites, the variety of minerals and gemstones that can be found, and the amount of public lands available to rock collectors. And thats not to mention the overall beauty and wonder that is Oregon.

For years, settlers came to Oregon in pursuit of the wealth that had been found in mining different kinds of minerals. The most common of these was gold. As a matter of fact, the gold prospectors who flocked to Oregon all those years ago are responsible for the settling of a lot of the southwestern and northeastern parts of the state.

The rocks and minerals that are listed in this post are the more common ones that you can find in Oregon. This list of minerals in no way represents the overall amount of minerals that can be found in the state.

Oregon has proven itself to be a very productive state when it comes to looking for gold. The state of Oregon has had several gold rushes over the years, which has accounted for a total of approximately 6 millions ounces of gold found. In addition to gold, silver is another precious metal that has been successfully recovered.

Oregon is a very popular destination for gold prospectors even today. Gold has been found in nearly every part of the state. And with its numerous rivers and streams, it makes for a gold prospectors dream.

As you know, there are many different kinds of agates and chalcedony. And Oregon is a great location for finding these wonderful gemstones. While these can be found all over the state, the more popular areas these gemstones can be found are along the Oregon coast, including Agate Beach at Newport, in some of the streams draining the Western Cascade, near the town of Antelope and around Prineville in central Oregon, near Hart Mountain and Lakeview in south-central Oregon, and at Succor Creek in southeastern Oregon.

While jasper falls into the same chalcedony family as agates, jasper is often times sought after as a separate gemstone. And like many other chalcedony varieties, jasper is widely available for rock collectors in the state of Oregon.

And while there are many different kinds of jasper in Oregon, the most popular types of jasper in the state are Biggs jasper, Deschutes jasper and Owyhee Jasper. Each of these are known for their unique appearance when cut and polished.

Again, jasper can be found all over the state, but I often will find lots of jasper when searching for agates. And for me, the best place to find jasper in quantity is in the Willamette Valley. Specifically on the gravel bars of the Willamette River and its tributaries.

Obsidian is a volcanic glass thats actually a rock and not a mineral. The best place, hands down, to find obsidian in Oregon is at Glass Buttes in Lake County. Glass Buttes is a massive deposit of many different kinds of obsidian. Theres so much obsidian here that all you have to do is step out of your vehicle and literally reach down and pick it up.

Oregon Sunstone also happens to be Oregons state gemstone. Sunstone is a feldspar crystal that weathers out of certain lava flows in the south-central region of Oregon. The color of the Sunstone is dependent on the amount of copper thats found in the stone. This is what changes the sunstones color from yellow (less copper) to red (more copper).

Sunstone can be collected on BLM land near Lakeview, OR. The sunstones collected in this area are known for being quite clear and show the included scales and spangles of hematite, which increases the beauty of the sunstone.

Thundereggs can range in diameter from less than one inch to over four feet, while golf ball sized thundereggs seem to be the most common size found. Incredibly plain looking on the outside, When cut open and polished, thundereggs reveal exquisite designs in a wide variety of colors. Thundereggs are found mostly in Crook, Jefferson, Malheur, Wasco and Wheeler counties.

Oregons state rock can be collected at fee and free sites in central and southeastern Oregon. To learn more about thundereggs, how they were formed and where you can collect them, check out my post, All About Thundereggs And Where To Find Them.

I love looking for petrified wood. Its probably one of my favorite things to look for. These ancient wood fossils are found all over the state. However, theres some places that are better than others. Generally speaking, the western side of the state offers better rockhounding opportunities for petrified wood.

In addition to pay to dig sites, there are plenty of areas you can search for petrified wood that wont cost you a cent. Without question, the best place to find petrified wood in Oregon is in the same areas that I recommend looking for agates and jasper. Mixed among the other rocks in the gravel bars in the numerous rivers and streams of the cascades and Willamette Valley are excellent quality specimens of petrified wood.

In my opinion, opal is one of the most beautiful gemstones that can be found in Oregon. Oregon produces a variety of types of opal which can be found by the most determined rock collectors. Some of the varieties located in the state include, but not limited to blue, dendritic, crystal, hyalite and rainbow.

Similar to the way that quartz is formed, amethyst is formed in crystal lined geodes or filling cavities in rhyolitic and basaltic rocks. And it should be noted that the amethyst crystals found in Oregon are not nearly as brilliant in color as the amethyst crystals found in South America. Oregon amethyst is much more pale in comparison, and is part of the reason why it hasnt been highly sought after in the state.

Quartz and all of the different kinds of gemstones that belong to the quartz family (including amethyst) make up the majority of semi-precious gem material found in Oregon. As a matter of fact, there are more than 200 varieties of quartz in the world, and half of these can be found in Oregon.

If looking for a location to collect quartz, consider exploring the Quartzville Creek area. According to OregonDiscover.com, Quartzville Creek is known for its quartz deposits. Also, collectors can find agates, jasper, petrified wood, and gold nuggets along 9-mile of the recreation corridor. Recreational mining guidelines are available in BLM, Salem District. There are private claims in the area, be careful not to trespass.

One of the best tools Ive owned as a rockhound here in Oregon is the book, Rockhounding Oregon: A Guide to the States Best Rockhounding Sites. This guide is full of exact location dig sites for all kinds of rocks, minerals and fossils. It includes in depth descriptions as well as turn by turn directions as well as GPS coordinates and rockhounding maps for some of the best dig sites in Oregon.

jordan creek placer mine western mining history

All mine locations were obtained from the USGS Mineral Resources Data System. The locations and other information in this database have not been verified for accuracy. It should be assumed that all mines are on private property.

chimney rock gemstone mine - 2021 all you need to know before you go (with photos) - tripadvisor

This is the version of our website addressed to speakers of English in the United States. If you are a resident of another country or region, please select the appropriate version of Tripadvisor for your country or region in the drop-down menu. more