sluice boxes used in iron ore mining

gold sluice box - mineral processing

Vibrating sluice box ( pulsating sluice ) is a new type of placer gold mining equipment developed on the ordinary fixed gold sluice box. The vibrating sluice box is a gravity separation machine, mainly used for the placer gold mines. It combines the advantages of fixed chutes and jigs, over the shortcomings of silting-up, harden, has a very good effect on recover fine gold.Some small or medium scale plants specific in Africa rely on the gold sluice box for the primary concentration of nugget gold as well as very fine particle gold, both can be achieved in the same pass.

This is a gold wash plant that we provided for Ghana customer. as we may know that Ghana is very rich of alluvial gold ores, which contains big gold nugget of high grade, but the soil is very sticky, and not easy to wash and clean. This type of gold wash plant is a very popular design in Ghana, many miners prefer to apply it. And the final fine recovered and concentrated gold ores will be collected by the gold sluice box.The water washed through the gold trough, bringing clay, sand and other impurities to the counter-current end. Due to the high density of gold, it will stay. Most of the gold will be left on the sticky gold blanket at the lower end of the gold sink, or it will be deposited in the slow water block. The gold trough is widely used in placer gold mining, whether it is a small or large mine.

1. Low price, no electric power need, lightweight, easy installation.2. Adjustable combined with grizzly feeder, hopper, trommel scrubber, vibrating screen, centrifugal concentrator;3. Install the gold carpet/mat to catch the fine and coarse gold.

gold sluice box design

The goldsluice box is an efficient alternative to panning for gold, allowing the prospector to quickly sift through a much greater volume of sediment. Although many affordable varieties are available to purchase, they are even more affordable to build. With a little knowledge, skill, and creativity, a prospector can build a custom sluice box from almost any type of solid material available.

First, the prospector/builder of gold mining equipment must understand how sluice boxes work. The boxes mimic a stream bed, allowing water and sediment to wash over it and deposit denser objects along the parts of the stream where the water moves more slowly. Imagine a current of water or air moving over a surface. The current slows down when it is forced to move around or over an object, and this is where the dense particles settle out of the current. For example, when sand or snow is carried off of the ground by wind, the air current slows down when it encounters a fence. The heavier particles are deposited, leaving a trail on the opposite side of the fence; whereas the lighter ones remain in the current. Another example is when a current is forced through a winding path. It will slow down when it hits each curve, and the heaviest particles will be deposited there; whereas the lighter ones remain in the current. With this concept in mind, one can envision a variety of sluice box designs.

Regarding the actual construction of the box, you will need at least part of it to be submerged in the stream at a slight angle, so that you can take advantage of the natural current to wash the particles through the box, and the box must be held in place either by posts or by a heavy rock or two. You will need a section, either above the main part of the box, or right next to it (as in the photo above), where the sediment can be dumped into the box. Also before designing the sluice box, its important to know that boxes less than four or five feet in length have been shown to be just as effective as longer boxes.

Finally, one must take into consideration the types of materials available to build the box, the design that is most conducive to trap the gold particles that are being sought, and even ergonomic aspects that will make the process most comfortable for the prospector. Sluice box designers have incorporated riffles, curves, and even carpet to catch the finest particles. They maybe magnetized in areas to catch tiny magnetic minerals to which gold particles are sometimes attached, and may be made out of materials such as wood, plastic, aluminum, or a combination of them. Before designing your box, take into account all of the options and do a bit of research on the size and type of gold particles that are common in the deposit.

Rubber Matting, as shown in the illustration at left, is used in placer and mill operations, replacing blankets for recovering coarse and fine gold. The innumerable small recesses catch and retain the values, particularly in the fine sizes. Rubber Matting is very easily washed, a fact which simplifies its clean-up. It is so tough that its life is many times that of ordinary blankets. Full rolls are 24 inches wide by 50 feet long; weight of full rolls is only 100 lbs., for ease in handling, but any length is available. This Rubber Matting can be furnished on a continuous belt concentrator similar to a vanner, with water sprays for the removal of the concentrates. This unit is built two feet wide and can be furnished in any length required to meet specifications for a particular operation.

Corduroy Matting is made up of strongly ribbed fabric material. It is widely used by the mining industry for gold recovery in sluices, launders, and on tables. Both a wide rib, best suited for placer undercurrents, and a narrow rib, designed for ground oretreatment, can be obtained in a width of 36 and in any lengthsdesired. The weight is approximately one pound per yard of length.

A sluice is generally defined as an artificial channel through which controlled amounts of water flow. Sluice box and riffles are one of the oldest forms of gravity separation devices used today (Photo 3). The size of sluices ranges from small, portable aluminum models used for prospecting to large units hundreds of feet long. Sluice boxes can be made out of wood, aluminum, plastic or steel. Modern sluices are built as one unit although sluices formed in sections are still used. A typical sluice section is 12 feet long and one foot wide. As a rule, a long narrow sluice is more efficient than a short wide one. The sluice should slope 4 to 18 inches per 12 feet, usually 1-1/8 to 1 - inches per foot, depending on the amount of available water, the size of material processing, and the size of the gold particles.

The riffles in a sluice retard material flowing in the water, which forms the sand bed that traps heavy particles and creates turbulence. This turbulence causes heavy particles to tumble and repeatedly exposes them to the trapping medium. An overhanging lip, known as a Hungarian riffle, increases the turbulence behind the riffle, which agitates the sand bed, improving gold recovery (Figures 3-5). Riffles can be made of wood, rocks, rubber, iron or steel, and are generally 1- inches high, placed from one-half inch to several inches apart. The riffles are commonly fastened to a rack that is wedged into the sluice so that they can be easily removed. Mercury may be added to riffles to facilitate fine gold recovery, but its escape into the environment must be prevented.

In addition to riffles, other materials are used to line sluices for enhanced recovery. In the past, carpet, corduroy, burlap, and denim were all used to line sluices to aid in the recovery of fine gold. Long-strand Astro-Turf, carpet, screens, and rubber mats are used today for the same purpose (Photo 4). In Russia, some dredges use sluices with continuously moving rubber matting for fine- gold recovery (Zamyatin and others, 1975).

To perform efficiently, a sluice needs large amounts of clean water. Enough water should be added to the feed to build up a sand bed in the bottom of the sluice. For maximum recovery, the flow should be turbulent, yet not forceful enough to wash away the sand bed. Russian studies have shown that recovery increases with the frequency of cleanups. On one dredge, gold recovery was 90% for 12-hour gold cleanups and increased to 94% when sluices were cleaned every 2 hours (Zamyatin and others, 1975).

For cleanup, clear water is run through the sluice until the riffles are clear of gravel. A pan or barrel is placed at the discharge end to prevent loss of concentrate. Starting from the head of the sluice, riffles are removed and carefully washed into the sluice. Any bottom covering is removed and washed into a separate container. Cleanup continues until all riffles are removed and washed. Large pieces of gold should be removed by hand, then the concentrate is washed out of the sluice or dumped into a suitable container. The collected concentrate may be sent to a smelter but is usually further concentrated by panning, tabling, or a variety of other methods, including re-sluicing. After cleanup, the sluice is reassembled and more material is processed.

Gold recovery with sluices can vary depending on a number of factors. Fine gold losses can be minimized by cleaning up more frequently, reducing the speed of the slurry flow to 2 to 3 feet per second, and decreasing the size of the feed, usually be screening. Some operators have increased recovery by adding a liner to the sluice to trap fine gold, and others have lengthened sluices to increase the square footage of particle trapping area.

Overall, sluices are widely used today due to their low cost and availability. They have many advantages. They require little supervision and maintenance; they can tolerate large fluctuations in feed volume; they are portable; properly operated, they can approach a gold recovery of 90%; and they entail a minimal initial investment.

Disadvantages include: very fine particles of gold are not effectively recovered; frequent cleanups are required; sluices can not operate when being cleaned; and large volumes of clean wash water are needed. Although some manufacturers offer sluice boxes, the majority of those in use are fabricated for specific operations,usually by local firms or by the individual.

A sluice is generally defined as an artificial channel through which flows controlled amounts of water. In gold placering, the sluice includes sluice-boxes which collect the gold by means of various configurations of riffles, corrugations, mats, expanded metal, or the like, which trap the heavier particles while allowing the waste to continue through. Figure 5 shows a portable

lightweight metal sluicebox suitable for test work or a small-scale placer operation. An important part of any sluicing operation is its water supply, and where water is not plentiful, pumps, pipelines, or even dams with special headgates may be required.

Small-scale sluicing by hand methods has been called quite appropriately shoveling-into-boxes. In contrast, in ground sluicing, usually a more efficient operation, most of the excavation is accomplished by the action of water flowing openly over the materials to be mined. In either case, the materials pass through a sluice, where gold is collected behind riffles. A variation of the sluicing technique, where water is stored and released against or across the materials intermittently, is called booming.

The sluicebox in its simplest form might be a 12-foot-long plank of 1- by 12-inch pine lumber, to which sides about 10 to 12 inches high are nailed, with braces secured at several places across the top. Larger sluices can be made with battens to cover joints between boards where gold might slip out, and with braces built around the outsides of the box for greater rigidity. To provide for a series of boxes, the ends should be beveled or the units tapered so that one will slip into the other in descending order and form a tight joint. Four to eight such boxes in series would be a typical installation.

Two men hand-shoveling into sluiceboxes can wash 5 to 10 times as much gravel as could be put through a rocker in a day. The slope of the sluice and the supply of water must be adjusted so that the gravel, including larger cobbles, will keep moving through the boxes and on out. Slopes of 4 to 12 inches per 12-foot box are normal, but if water is in short supply the slope may be increased. Trestles are necessary to support the boxes over the excavated ground, gulleys, or swales.

Inside the boxes, various kinds of riffles may be employed, depending upon the availability of material and personal preference. The riffles, which go on the bottom, are usually set crosswise in the box, but they can also be effective when placed lengthwise, the concentrates settling between them. They may be of wood, or of strap or angle iron, or a combination of the two. Straight, round poles or a pattern of square blocks or stones can serve for riffles. Rubber or plastic strips have even been used. Durability is important for prolonged operations, so wood may be armored with metal. Expanded metal, heavy wire screen, or cocoa mats make good riffles for collecting fine gold.

A common height for riffles is 1 inches; they may be placed from one-half to several inches apart. Fastening the riffles to a rack, which is then wedged into place in the box. permits their removal. A tapered shape on the cross riffle, with the thinnest edge to the bottom, tends to create an eddying action that is favorable for concentration. Another way to achieve this eddying action is to cant the riffle or even just the top of the riffle. Burlap or blanket material is commonly placed under the riffles to help in collecting fine gold. Mercury may be added to some sections of the sluice if there is much fine gold, but care must be taken to prevent escape of the mercury.

Sluice cleanups should be made at fairly regular intervals. After running clear water until the sluice is free of gravel, riffles are removed in sections starting at the upper end. With a thin stream of water, the lighter of the remaining material is washed to the sections below. The gold, heavy sands, and amalgam, if mercury has been used, are scraped up and placed in buckets. This mixture then can be panned or cleaned up in a rocker to obtain a final concentrate or amalgam.

It is common in a small operation, when feeding the sluice, to place a heavy screen or closely spaced bars of some sort across the section where the gravels enter, to eliminate the larger particles, which are probably barren anyway. The screen or bars (a grizzly) should be sloped so the oversize material rolls off to the side. The size of mesh or spacing will depend upon the gradation of feed, but would generally be in the range of to 1 inch, with 3/8 inch being a common size. In larger operations a rotating screen, or trommel, might be used. In a ground sluicing operation, possibly all materials would be run through the sluiceboxes. Provisions must be made for removing the oversize material, and, if required, stacking it away from the work area.

If the gravel contains much clay it may be desirable to use a puddling box at the head of the string of sluiceboxes. This may be any convenient sizefor instance, 3 feet wide by 6 feet long, with 6- to 8-inch sides. The clayey material is shoveled into this box and broken up with a hoc or rake before being allowed to pass into the sluice. The importance of this step is that if allowed through the sluice, the unbroken clay lumps may pick up and carry away gold particles already deposited.

Usually, the shoveling-in method proceeds as follows: After the boxes are set, shoveling begins at an advantageous point. Experienced miners work out the ground in regular cuts and in an orderly fashion. Enough faces are provided so that shovelers will not interfere with one another. Provision is made to keep bedrock drained, and boulders and stumps are moved a minimum number of times. Cuts are taken of such a width and length that shoveling is made as easy as possible. The boxes are kept as low as possible so a minimum lift of gravel is necessary. At the same time an adequate slope must be maintained for the gravel to run through the boxes under the limitations of the available water. Allowance for dump room must also be provided at the tail end of the sluice. Leaks in the sluice are stopped promptly, and shoveling is done in such a manner that the sluice does not become clogged nor does water splash out. (Water in the pit hampers shoveling.)

All material of a size that will run through the sluice is shoveled in, and the oversize material is thrown to one side. Boulders from the first cut should be stacked outside the pit, on barren ground if possible. The width of a cut is usually limited to the distance a man can shovel in one operation. When shoveling from more than several feet away, it is best to set boards above and on the opposite side of the box; this increases the efficiency of the shovelers. The greatest height a man can shovel into a box is 7 to 8 feet, and above 5 or 6 feet the efficiency of the shoveler is markedly reduced. If the gravel is over 3 or 4 feet deep, it usually is excavated in benches to facilitate digging and to, permit the upper layers to be raised a minimum shoveling height. Where the gravel is shallow, wheelbarrows may be used. Another way is to shovel the gravel onto a conveyor belt that discharges into a trommel, discarding the oversize material and running the undersize material through the sluice. Where two or more persons are working in the same cut, the height of succeeding benches is governed by the character of the material being dug and the distance the gravel has to be lifted.

The sluice may be maintained on the surface of unworked ground or supported on bents on the opposite side of the cut. After the first cut the boulders are thrown onto the cleaned-up bedrock. Where cuts are run on both sides of the sluice, the boxes are supported on bents as the ground underneath them is dug out. At other places the boxes may be set on bedrock and the dirt may be shoveled into the head of the sluice from short transverse cuts at the upper end of the pit. Work usually begins at the lower end of a deposit so that bedrock may be kept drained, and then proceeds across the deposit by regular cuts. The length and order of the cuts will depend upon local conditions. As heavy sands and gravel build up deposits between the riffles in the sluice, it may be necessary to stir these up to prevent packing and the consequent override of gold particles. A tined implement such as a pitchfork is often convenient for this. Larger stones that lodge in the sluiceway may be similarly removed.

The quantity of water available will influence the scale of operations and the size of sluice used. A minimum flow of 15 to 20 miners inches (170 to 225 gallons per minute) is required for a 12-inch-wide sluicebox with a steep grade. Smaller flows than this can be utilized by storing the water in some kind of reservoir and using the supply intermittently. A common practice followed where the quantity of water is limited is to use a grizzly or screen over the sluice to eliminate oversize material and thus increase the duty of the water. Reduction in the amount of material to be treated by first running it through a trommel to wash and screen out the coarse size is another effective way to lower the water requirements.

Water usually is conducted via ditch to the sluice. However, if the ground is rich enough it may be practicable to pump water for the sluice. The feasibility of obtaining a gravity flow should first be investigated, as the expense of pumping may be more than the cost of a long ditch, when the cost is distributed over the yardage of gravel moved. A suitable number of sluice-boxes or some other removal system may be used to transport the tailings to a dumping ground away from the working area. A tailings or settling pond may be required to maintain downstream water quality.

Ground sluicing utilizes the cascading effect of water to break down the gravel; hence, the requirements for water are much greater. The chief application of ground sluicing is to streambed deposits. Pipelines, flumes, or ditches would be necessary if ground sluicing were applied to gravels higher up on banks or terraces, and the larger scale hydraulic methods would then become more favorable. If booming is to be done, a dam and reservoir are needed. The dam is usually equipped with a gate mechanism that permits either automatic or manual control and quick release of the impounded water for maximum washing effect. The water may be passed over the upper face of a gravel bank or diverted against the bottom in order to undercut and carry away the gravel as the face of the bank breaks down. All materials are channeled toward the sluice.

The natural flow of a stream can be used by diverting the current with boards or simply with piled boulders. Shears can be constructed of 1- or 2-inch-thick boards 12 feet long nailed to pairs of tripods so that the boards slope back from the water flow at an angle of about 60. The tripods are built in such a way that boulders can be piled inside the base to hold them in place. A row of these shears may be used to divert the force of the water against a bank, or two rows may be used to form a flume.

The seasonal nature of stream flow in different areas must be kept in mind when planning any placer operation. State and Federal agencies can provide information on stream runoff for many of the more important streams, information which will indicate the limitations in water supply that might be expected due to seasonal changes.

gold sluice box | fine gold recovery sluices - jxsc machine

Feeding size20mm Capacity8T/H (customizable) Minerals main in alluvial gold, tin ApplicationOpen cast mining, seashore, riverbank, gold dredger, etc. TypeFixed gold sluice, portable sluice box, pulsating sluice box.

DescriptionGold sluice box with mat is a kind of mineral gravity separation equipment, mainly used in the alluvial gold wash plant, gold dredger, open-pit gold mining, definitely an important gold panning equipment. High recovery rate, mature technology, wide application, economical and environmental protection. Types of sluice boxstationary sluice box, portable sluice box, vibrating gold sluice; According to the capacity, divided into large scale sluice and small sluice box. The former is used in the open-pit mining plant, ore granularity is 50-100mm; the mini gold sluice box on gold dredger, mobile gold mining plants, and the granularity is less than 20mm. Related equipmentbefore sluice box: gold centrifugal concentrator; After sluice box: gold shaker table. Sluice mat materialPE, rubber ( natural rubber and recycled material), plastic, etc. Small sluice boxPortable, assemble in 30 minutes. Pumps with gasoline engines to pumping placer sand from streams and river, suits for shallow water area placer gold washing process. Serives(1) sluice box length and width custom made (2) different gold carpet materials and shapes (3) equip metal sluice cap and lock keep gold safe.

Main partsgrizzly bar, sluice, mat, frame, water pipe, etc. Working principle of gold sluice boxPlacer gold mining refers to separating gold from alluvial gold deposits. Under the combined action of water flow force, gravity (or centrifugal force) and friction between ore particles and trough bottom, ore particles with different specific gravity are loosely stratified and separated. Heavy density settles in the bottom of the trough into concentrate, the small density proportion flows out, that is tailings. Factors affects sluice box 1. height difference 2. water flow velocity 3. slurry ratio 4. slope angle Sluice box priceSluice box always works with trommel scrubber, gold centrifugal concentrator, shaker table, and so on gold mining equipment. Contact us, 12hrs quotation about a single machine or complete gold wash plant. How to select gold mining equipment? On the Gold mining ship 1. water depth 2. sand layer thickness 3. stone size and proportion 4. capacity 5. other local geographical conditions. Gold mining in dryland 1. processing capacity 2. stone size and proportion 3. water source distance, clean or not 4. contain slime or not.

Advantages of gold sluice box 1. Low price, no electric power need, lightweight, easy installation. 2. Adjustable combined with grizzly feeder, hopper, trommel scrubber, vibrating screen, centrifugal concentrator; 3. Install the gold carpet/mat to catch the fine and coarse gold. Sluice box manufacturer JXSC supply sluice box and other mineral processing equipment since 1985, our machines have been exporting to more than 30 countries. Welcome to visit the JXSC factory.

high production sluice box

The gold sluices in which the gold is caught are constructed on exactly the same principles as those already described, but are larger and, though usuallymade of wood, are of more massive construction, in accordance with the great quantities of gravel to be handled and the continuous nature of the work. The sluices are commonly called flumes, but it is better to restrict the use of this word to a conduit for carrying water only. The sluice boxes used in hydraulic mining, though, as usual, only 12 feet long, are as much as from 3 to 6 feet wide and from 2 to 3 feet deep; they are lined with heavy planks on the sides, and the pavements are made of more durable materials than is usual in shallow placer sluicing, wooden blocks, rocks, or T railroad iron being most usually employed. The wooden blocks are from 12 to 30 inches square, and from 8 to 13 inches deep. They are usually made of one of the softer varieties of pine which broom up under friction, and thus present a better catching surface. The blocks are cut across the grain of the wood, and are set side by side across the sluice, each row separated from the next by strips of wood to which they are nailed, while they are also kept in position by the side lining which is placed upon them. The interstices in the block pavement act as gold catchers, and are filled with small stones, or, with less advantage, allowed to fill up with gravel when washing begins. On account of the rapid wearing away of the wood, much of the gold and amalgam caught is scooped out and carried off again. Wooden block riffles last only a few weeks when in heavy work, but are easy to take up and put down again in cleaning up; they are discarded when worn so as to be only 4 to 6 inches thick.

Rock pavements are made of those boulders which are most easily obtained in the particular district. Basalt is generally used, oval stones of 15 or 18 inches long and from 9 to 12 inches thick being selected and placed on end, with a slight slant in the direction in which the current flows. They are held in place by wooden planks which divide the sluice into compartments, so that if one stone works loose the pavement as a whole is not affected. The interstices as before are filled with gravel. Rock pavements are very durable, lasting from three to six months, but require more grade to the sluice, and occasion loss of time in cleaning-up and repaving the sluices. Consequently, they are never used near the head of a sluice, where cleaning-up is a frequent operation, but are often used for the lower parts of sluices, where they sometimes alternate with block riffles, and are especially suited for tail-sluices which are only cleaned- up once a year. Rock pavements cost less than other forms of riffles.

Iron riffles, which usually consist of T-iron rails, are placed longitudinally in the sluice, closely packed side by side. They present a large amount of space available for catching the gold and amalgam, last well, present little resistance to the current (so that the grade may be low while the duty of the water remains high), and are easily taken up and put down. They are, therefore, generally used at the head of the sluices. Though their first cost is higher than that of wooden blocks, they are more economical in the end, owing to the saving of time in cleaning-up and to their longer life. Egleston instances the results of experiments made atthe Morning Star Claim, California, where three sections of sluice, each 95 feet long, were laid at a distance of 300 feet from the face of the bank which was being worked. The first section was as usual laid with wooden blocks, the second with old rails, and the third with rocks. When the clean-up was made the middle section gave 9 ozs. more of gold bullion than both the others combined. If old rails cannot be had, strips of wood bound with iron are used, but are less durable and satisfactory.

At the Blue Spur Consolidated Gold Companys plant, Gabriels Gully, New Zealand, where the sluice is necessarily very short, most of the stones are first separated from the gravel, and the finer material is then passed over a sluice paved with transverse angle-iron riffles, placed with the hollow side facing down stream (Fig 19, in which the arrow shows the direction ofthe stream); these iron riffles are placed 2 or 3 inches apart. Below the section containing these riffles, there is a false bottom to the sluice, formed by an iron plate perforated with small round holes through which some of the water and the finest particles of the gravel fall on to cocoa-nut fibre matting, laid on the true bottom of the sluice. Here the fine gold is caught, the principle being similar to that used in undercurrents.

The sluice is often divided into two by a median longitudinal partition, so that one side may be at work while the other is being cleaned-up or repaired, both sides being sometimes worked when water is very plentiful. There are usually unpaved rock- cuts above the sluice, leading to it from the places undergoing the process of piping. These rock-cuts are rarely supplied with mercury, and very little gold is usually caught there.

The length of the sluice, if capital is not lacking, depends on the cost of construction and of the maintenance, as comparedwith the value of the gold saved owing to the increased length of the system. The length may be diminished by a plentiful use of drops, grizzlies and undercurrents, all of which are described above under the head of shallow placer sluicing; they are made of proportionately large size in hydraulic mining. Coarse gold is of course soon caught, but fine gold may successfully evade all the riffles of a long sluice. The Spring Valley Mine had three parallel lines of sluices, each 2 miles in length, and it was estimated that 95 per cent, of the gold contents of the gravel was caught. This length is unusual, the average not exceeding about 1,000 feet.

The grade depends on the available fall of the ground and on the character of the material to be washed. The minimum is from 2 to 4 inches per box, such low grades being sometimes enforced by the nature of the ground, sometimes adopted from choice if the gravel islight, the gold fine, and water plentiful. With these low grades, however, disintegration is slow and incomplete; stones, unless they are small, cannot be sluiced large ones block the sluices and must be removed by hand, and the duty of the water, as regards sand, is greatly decreased. The 6-inch grade is that most generally used, but as much as 12 inches per box, or even more is required when water is scarce or the gravel coarse. Steep grades effect disintegration rapidly, thus shortening the length of the sluice, and enable all but the largest rocks to be sluiced, but less gold is then caught and a more plentiful use of undercurrents is necessary. It is considered necessary to have a sufficient depth of water to cover the largest boulders to be sluiced, but the deeper the water, the more difficult it is to save gold. Where poor or top gravel is being piped, it is worked off as rapidly as possible, and with little regard to the percentage of gold saved.

The duty of the miners inchthat is, the quantity of material washed down by an inch of water in twenty-four hoursvaries with the grade and other conditions. It varies from about 1 to 5 or more cubic yards of gravel per inch.

Mercury is added daily during the run in gradually lessening quantities, the object being to keep the mercury uncovered and clean at the top of the riffles. The feeding is regulated by the appearance of the amalgam in the sluice, the additions being made in the riffles near the head-box and in the undercurrents. The loss of mercury is usually from 5 to 10 per cent, of the amount used per run. When cemented gravels are being treated, owing to the extra amount of trituration required, the loss may be as high as 30 per cent. These losses are the more serious, for the reason that amalgam is more easily lost than pure mercury, so that a heavy loss of mercury denotes a heavy loss of gold.

The process does not differ from that described under the heading of shallow placer mining. It is advisable not to defer the clean-up too long as losses of amalgam are caused by the wearing of the riffles. Usually from 50 to 95 per cent, of the total yield of amalgam is caught in the first twenty or thirty boxes, which are cleaned-up frequently. The following table shows the percentage yield of the various sections of the sluices, at the North Bloomfield Mine, California, for the year 1877-8:

The first undercurrent caught five times as much as the sixth, and nearly three times as much as the seventh, which was of double size. The yield of the seventh ($947) induced the Company to add another undercurrent. This mine affords an example of the difficulty of catching fine gold. The gold loss was unknown, but was believed not to exceed 5 per cent, of the contents of the gravel.

The bullion obtained by retorting the amalgam from the sluices is finer than that from quartz mills, and is sometimes 990 fine in Australia, although Californian placer gold is often as low as 850 fine. The remainder is mainly silver, but copper, lead, iron, and some of the minerals existing in the gravel also occur. The amalgam from the head of the sluices yields finer gold than that caught lower down and in the undercurrents.

The tail-sluices usually terminate on the side of a canon, in a river, or in the sea. The enormous amount of loose sand and gravel, delivered from the hydraulic mines of Placer County, California, and the neighbouring counties into the Yuba and Feather rivers prior to 1880, filled up their beds to such an extent that in rainy weather disastrous floods ensued, and much valuable agricultural land was buried beneath sterile drift deposits and rendered worthless. The farmers thereupon took action against the Mining Companies and obtained a perpetual injunction forbidding them to discharge their tailings into these rivers. The result has been to stop hydraulic mining in these districts, and the efforts to work the deep leads more extensively by drifting, or on the other hand, to impound the tailings bydams made of brushwood, or to return them to their original position, have not resulted in unqualified success. Consequently the gold winning industry has not been maintained on the extensive scale it had assumed prior to the action of the courts, the impounding of tailings behind brushwood dams having only partially solved the difficulty.

In many cases the gravel from deep leads won by drift or shaft mining is cemented by iron oxides or clay into a conglomerate which is too tough to be easily disintegrated in the sluices. It is then passed through cement mills, which closely resemble the stamp battery to be described in the next chapter, the chief differences to be noted being in the facilities for delivery. Double discharge mortars are used, and the screens are very coarse, the mesh being usually about inch, but varying up to inch in diameter. One battery of ten stamps, each weighing 950 lbs., making 94 drops of 9 inches in height per minute, will crush about 40 or 50 tons of gravel in ten hours so that it will pass through a 3/16-inch mesh screen. Mercury is put into the mortar, and most of the gold is usually caught there on amalgamated copper plates, but copper plates outside the mortar are also used as in quartz-milling, and rubbers are employed to brighten the gold. If well-arranged plates are laid down, the number of sluice boxes which can be added with advantage is very small, a length of from 50 to 300 feet being used, the former limit being most common. No attempt is made to save the auriferous magnetic sands and sulphides which these conglomerates usually contain.

In the case of the Morning Star Cement Gravel Mine, Placer County, California, quotedby R. H. Richards, the weight of the stamps was 850 lbs., the height of drop 6 to 8 inches,, the number of drops per minute 95 to 100, the size of screen holes 3/16 inch (round), and the capacity per stamp per twenty- four hours 12 tons.

In cases where cement mills are not required, the gravel is washed in sluices which differ little from those already described. The boxes are not more than from 18 inches to 24 inches wide and deep, and the series is seldom more than 300 or 400 feet long. Iron riffles are most in favour. Where the amount of gravel to be washed is small, or the water is scarce, the gravel is allowed to accumulate for some time and the water stored in a tank or reservoir. It is in some cases a great advantage to keep compacted gravels exposed to the air during a few months before washing them, as they slack and disintegrate under the influence of the weather, and subsequently are more easily treated, while for a similar reason, tailings are sometimes impounded, and re-washed after some time has elapsed. The disintegration of cemented material, which has been slacked by exposure to the weather, is usually completed in a cement-pan. This is a cast-iron pan with perforated bottom, and with a gate in the side for the removal of boulders, which are mostly barren and are separated from the auriferous material by this system, instead of being crushed and mixed with it, as is the case when stamp-mills are used. In the pan, four revolving arms, furnished with plough-shares, break up the gravel, which is carried through the apertures in the bottom by a stream of water, and falls into the sluice. A pan of 5 feet in diameter and 2 feet in depth will treat from 40 to 120 tons per day, according to the nature of the gravel.

sluice boxes at kellyco | gold prospecting equipment

Sluice boxes are designed to take advantage of laws of gravity, while also considering the fact that gold is denser than other materials. Seen as an inexpensive piece of equipment for the active gold prospector, there are a number of options available to any individual who may be wishing to invest in this particular item. However, with a sluice box making it easier to know when you have hit paydirt, then checking out the various boxes and choosing the right one for your needs may prove to be the best investment of your time.

If you have ever watched a program such as Gold Rush, then you will have heard about sluice boxes. This may make you inadvertently believe that they will involve large pieces of equipment and an even larger bank balance, but thats not the case.

Instead, a sluice box can vary in size quite considerably. That being said, there are various components that you need to be aware of before you go ahead and invest in a brand new sluice box for gold prospecting.

The structure of a sluice box is simple and yet highly effective. The basic idea for gold sluice boxes is that it consists of a straight channel with slow spots at specific intervals. These slow spots are made by riffles, which then create a backflow of water. This, in turn, allows for any gold to drop and settle allowing you to extract the gold from the original material.

However, you need to consider the water flow. If there is too much water, the gold will be carried higher up in suspension, so it will effectively be swept away and not separated. If there is too little water, not only will the gold drop down too fast, but so will a lot of lighter material. This will block those slow spots, so if theres any gold it will end up being carried out of your sluice box with you being unable to extract it.

The same logic applies for any used sluice boxes for sale. The riffles could be damaged, so they will become blocked in a shorter time frame. Considering the potential for missing out on that gold, you might decide its worth buying a new, professionally made sluice box.

So far, we have mentioned water sluice boxes, but there is also the option of dry sluice boxes. This option uses air flow to effectively do the same thing as a water sluice box. If you are unable to hook up to a water supply, then this may be the best option for you.

At Kellyco, we stock a number of Keene sluice boxes ranging from hand-held to the Keene super sluice box designed for dealing with a larger volume of material. Of course, the best sluice box will be the one suited to your needs and, no matter what they may be, we would be happy to assist.

One option is to purchase a complete package. With this, you get everything from the sluice box itself to jets, the pump, the engine, and other items that will help you get started. This option comes in different sizes, while we also supply adjustable support legs to provide you with a stable platform to operate from. However, if this sounds overwhelming, then an item such as the Keene High Production Hand Sluice is also a great option. This has a wider design to increase the flow allowing you to pass through even more material in a shorter time frame.

The best sluice box to buy is undoubtedly dependent on how often you want to go gold prospecting and the amount of soil you plan on digging up. This is the kind of tool that will end up paying for itself, so if you are serious about this as a hobby, then investing in a gold sluice box with a powerful motor to drive it will be essential.

Buying a sluice box doesnt need to be stressful or confusing, but we here at Kellyco know that you may have a number of questions before making your purchase. If that is the case, then you can contact us via our customer care department where a member of our expert team of gold prospectors and detectorists will be happy to answer any questions that you may have.

gold well vortex drop riffle sluice box - gold prospecting mining equipment detectors snake protection

As seen on Bering Sea Gold! If you're a fan of the Discovery channel's popular Bering Sea Gold, then you've seen the Gold Well sluices in action aboard the AU Grabber. Nathan Makowski (brother of Bernie, the inventor of the vortex drop riffle sluice) used the Gold Well sluices on a dredge during the 2013 summer filming season in Nome, Alaska. Performance was exceptional!

No more carpets, matting, or miner's moss to clean up! Sluiceboxes haven't changed much in the last 100+ years... until now. This Gold Well Sluice was designed to recover ultra fine gold that traditional sluice boxes just might be missing. Since the majority of the available gold in the world is micro fine and ultrafine gold in the 30 micron (.0011 inch) range, you want a sluice that can collect that gold and keep it from running out the end.

The Gold Well Vortex Drop Riffle Sluice works by creating a gentle, vertically oriented vortex. This vortex keeps material in the spiral shaped Wells in motion, causing light material to be flushed out easily and concentrating heavy material. When a piece of gold crosses this vortex, it finds no stable bed to rest on and like a heavy object dropped in a bucket full of ball bearings being vibrated around, it drops to the bottom, where it stays, because there is no force coming up from the bottom to flush it back out.

Horizontal grooves are not designed to trap gold, they are mixing Wells. The slots create turbulence sufficient to cause light material to be forced up into the upper laminar flow regions of the water flow so they will be quickly removed by the water stream flowing through the sluice. The heavier materials move more slowly through the sluice, along the bottom where it is forced to cross the spiral Wells where it is trapped. The horizontal wells will of course trap larger pieces of gold. The Vortex Drop Riffle Sluice thinks it is a concentrator and is truly new and improved technology!

MANUFACTURER'S INFORMATION ON PUMPS: Water flow through the sluice should be between 2 and 8 gallons per minute per inch width of sluice. A 6 inch sluice should have a water flow of 12 and 30 gallons per minute. The water flow should not go below this. And a 12 sluice should have 24 to 96 gallons per minute supplied. Once the desired angle and level are established for the sluice, you will want to adjust your water flow. The flow is in the proper range when particles in the vortex pockets show circular motion. To do this you should set the water flow rate low, add a few scoops of dirt, then while watching the Gold Well pockets, slowly increase the flow rate UNTIL you see the material in the Gold Wells begin to rotate. This then will be the minimum water flow that you want to maintain in your Gold Well Sluice for proper operation. The water flow volume will be different for different materials. If the bulk of the material you are processing is light, you may want to run enough through the sluice first to get some heavy black sands built up, then adjust your water flow for the black sands, not the lighter silicon dioxide sands (generally the light colored sands).

Just think.... no more carpets, matting, or miner's moss to rinse over and over. No more clamps to deal with, and no more trying to clean the black sand from the gold. Clean up of this sluice is as simple as standing the sluice in a bucket and rinsing it with water. Then all you do is pan out that handful of material that was rinsed into the bucket from the sluice, and lo and behold your pan contains bright, shiny, fine gold! The Vortex Drop Riffle Sluice Box uses cutting edge new technology to get all the gold down to 400 mesh (most traditional sluices can recover about 60 mesh). Manufacturered in the USA. Scroll down this page for videos and more product information.

"This sluice has already proven itself! It really does get it all, right down to the barely, barely visible to the naked eye bits of gold! Probably even smaller, I just havent checked yet. Thank you for your impeccable service!" Wade H. from Alaska

The 6 Vortex Drop Riffle Sluices are made of 6061-T6 aluminum which is very durable. 12 Vortex Drop Riffle sluices are considered production or commercial sluices and are manufactured with 7075-T6 aluminum, one of the toughest alloys of aluminum available. The Goldwell sluice is the familiar gravity sluice type operation with some subtle and important differences. Most notable is that the sluice does not generally require as much water flow as other typical sluices, and that the angle of operation for successful capture of gold is extremely forgiving, making it easy even for novices to set up and operate effectively

There are four basic adjustments to consider when using any sluice, including the Vortex Drop Riffle sluice. They are LEVEL, ANGLE, WATER FLOW and MATERIAL FEED RATE. Your sluice should be level, set at an appropriate angle for the water volume/flow rate and material feed rate desired. Much of this information is also included in the Owners Manual that is provided by the manufacturer with each sluice.

LEVEL: Every foot along the sluice, at the junction between two collection bed plates (the plates with the spirals in them) is a small V-shaped groove between two rows of spirals closer together than the rest. When processing material, you should see a small amount of black sands accumulate there. This is an indication groove. When set up properly, the black sands from one side to the other of the sluice should appear fairly even in this groove, appearing like a dotted line. If it is more pronounced on one side than the other, the sluice is not level. It might also be caused by a difference in the water flow from one side to the other of the sluice.

ANGLE: The sluice has been tested from 2 degrees through 25 degrees, and performs admirably throughout that range. This sluice has even been operated at a 45 degree angle and still captured gold, including fine gold. But for most purposes the angle of use should probably fall in the range of 5 to 15 degrees, depending on needs. (For reference, 1.5 inch per foot of length equals 5 degrees. 3.5 inches per foot of length equals 15 degrees) Steeper angles produce a higher water velocity and a lower quantity of material at cleanout. Shallower angles will result in a lower velocity, forcing a lower feed rate of material but may be optimal for extremely fine gold such as recovery from tailing piles. There is no absolute rule of thumb here. Simply, the sluice placed at any angle between 5 and 20 degrees will perform admirably and recover gold of all practical sizes extremely well. 10 to 15 degrees will give a good feed rate and water velocity combination that will fit most needs. 5 degrees will serve well for processing materials such as crushed rock or tailings which contain a lot of ultra-fine gold. The relationship between angle and flow rate of the water will ultimately determine the proper feed rate at that combination of conditions. Spend some time testing your new sluice at different angles and feed rates to become familiar with how it works and what works best for you. Do not operate a Goldwell sluice to the specs of other types of sluices as it may not perform as well as it could. Most sluices are operated at 1 inch of drop per foot of length. The Gold Well sluice can operate at angles less than and far greater than this!

WATER FLOW: Once the desired angle and level are established for the sluice, you will want to adjust your water flow. The flow is in the proper range when particles in the vortex pockets show circular motion. To do this you should set the water flow rate low, add a few scoops of dirt, then while watching the sluice pockets, slowly increase the flow rate UNTIL you see the material in the gold wells begin to rotate. This then will be the minimum water flow that you want to maintain in your sluice for proper operation. The water flow volume will be different for different materials. If the bulk of the material you are processing is light, you may want to run enough through the sluice first to get some heavy black sands built up, then adjust your water flow for the black sands, not the lighter silicon dioxide sands (generally the light colored sands).

Water flow through the sluice should be between 2 and 8 gallons per minute per inch width of sluice. So a 6 inch sluice should have a water flow of 12 and 30 gallons per minute. The water flow should not go below this. A 12 sluice should have 24 to 96 gallons per minute supplied, but have been run as high as 150 GPM. Just because your valve or throttle or pump speed control may have a "wide open" position, keep in mind that does not automatically mean that wide open will be the best flow rate for the material your are processing.

The worst condition that you can have is scrubbing out the wells in the sluice! If the spiral wells are not keeping material in them (let the water run for a bit and see if the wells totally empty out), the sluice has either too much water velocity or too much angle or both. Scrubbing of the top row or two of spirals in normal. Only larger gold should be able to rest in these rows unless you are running at extremely low velocity and angle for super fine gold recovery. TIP: Adding a small amount of dish soap or Jet Dry to the water to break surface tension may reduce losses of ultra-fine gold when processing crushed ore or using the sluice in areas that have a high concentration of ultra fine gold. Do not add so much that the water gets foamy.

PROCESSING MATERIAL: The maximum feed rate is determined primarily by the water flow rate and the angle of your Vortex Drop Riffle Sluice. Increasing angle or water volume will allow a greater volume of material to be processed per unit time. If you have a lot of extremely fine gold, like when you are processing tailings, you may want to reduce the angle and increase the flow rate to keep a reasonable feed rate. If you are used to a normal sluice, you will find that the Gold Well Vortex Drop Riffle can process more material faster than you are used to. IF material is building up and staying for a period of time on the flat areas of the sluice between the wells, you are feeding the sluice TOO fast.

The sluice is designed to process unclassified materials provided enough water depth is delivered to the sluice to move the large material through the sluice. If sufficient water can not be delivered, either classify the materials to 3/8 or less and/or increase the sluice angle to help large material to move through the sluice. Classified materials will have the highest recovery, however, that is not to say that unclassified material will have poor recovery. To the contrary. In all the tests done so far, even unclassified materials, the recovery rates are still in excess of 95% for most gold. In some tests involving crushed ore from a vein, where the gold was 400 mesh and finer, the recovery was around 80% but that was due to the fact that gravity type systems do not typically do well in recovery of gold that is so small it is capable of staying in suspension in the water flow.

When working with materials that compact easily or are extremely sticky, such as material with a lot of clays in it or jagged crushed rock, check the Wells from time to time by taking a small probe and seeing if the material in the bottom of the Well moves around freely. If it does not move easily and is compacted, you may want to empty the sluice more often, or add some soap to the water to keep clay from re-adhering to itself in the sluice.

The sluice may be run at a wide range of attack angle. You should test the sluice at different angles to see what is best for the material that YOU are processing. Like any sluice, there will be an optimum water flow and angle for the material you are working with. One way to test this is to carefully pan out some samples of processed material (dirt that has already been put through the sluice) and look for fine gold there. Another way is to re-process the dirt and see if there is gold captured on the second pass.

CLEAN OUT: To empty the sluice, you should have a 5 gallon bucket or a small tub to stand it up in and flush it out into the bucket or tub. DO NOT spray it with an aggressive jet-like stream of water, as this may spray the water out and away from the sluice, as well as gold. Simply flood the pockets with adequate water, starting at the top and work to the bottom, then repeat until you are satisfied that all material in the sluice has been transferred to the bucket. From there you can then transfer it into a gold pan or some other final separation device. The quantity of material (black sands and unwanted silicate sands) will be about half of a cup. This greatly reduces the amount of material needing to be removed to get to your collected gold, and as a result, greatly reduces losses in the cleanup process.

CLEANING THE SLUICE: The sluice boxes are made from aluminum and stainless steel and will not corrode significantly in normal environments. Contrary to popular belief, salt water does NOT CORRODE ALUMINUM! However, salt water DOES create galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals, which DOES cause corrosion.) After use, rinse the Goldwell sluice in clean water to remove black sands and other minerals that contain iron, lead, silver, etc., which will cause corrosion over time if wet and left in the sluice. Do NOT use cleaners that contain ammonia or have a ph higher than 7 (alkaline). Use an acidic cleaner such as vinegar or vinegar and water to clean the sluice up if you want to clean it or an aluminum cleaner or polish.

Waterfall heads should be opened from time to time and cleaned of sediments in the bottom (flush out good with a water hose). The sediments will not interfere with proper operation and will only deposit in the quiet areas in the waterfall head where water flow is not significant.

ATTACHING YOUR OWN PUMP & HOSES: If you want to use a pump and hoses you already have or want to purchase those parts locally, keep in mind that pumps should be bilge or trash type pumps, designed to pump water that may contain debris. Other types of water pumps may work but may deteriorate much faster from pumping dirty water that contains abrasive fine sediments and organic material that may be recirculated in a closed system.

long toms and sluices improve gold mining | my gold rush tales

As mining operations became more complex, the long tom and the sluice came into widespread use. The long tom was a shallow trough 15 feet long and 15 inches high and often increasing in width near the low end and through which a constant stream of water ran. A miner would toss in ore and it would wash down through a sieve tacked across the top, called a riddle, where the rocks and stones could be easily picked out but the fine particles would pass through and fall into a shallow box with cleats, much like the rocker, where the gold dust was collected.

The sluice was a larger variation on the long tom, often as wide as 20 feet. At some point along the sluice was a grate of iron bars called a grizzly that worked to collect the large stones just as the riddle in the long tom did. Several sluices, one running into another, were often used to further refine the ore and even old tailings from the days of the rocker were known to produce a good wage when reprocessed. The Chinese, often barred from the more productive claims, were famous for making older diggings pay off this way.

The use of a long tom or sluice to refine gold from the ore bearing soil required a constant stream of water. Men would dig ditches to divert a stream. They built dams and flumes, sometimes transporting water great distances to where it was needed. One common method of moving water was a wheel, much like the paddlewheel of a riverboat that was connected to a series of buckets on a belt or to a pump. In river mining operations where the stream was diverted so the bed could be mined waterwheels were common and often placed as close to one another as possible.

I see. So this is how they gather and collect gold before. I wonder what methods they use now that there are better equipments and advanced technology. Perhaps they have maintained some of the methods but only somehow refined it for faster and more systematic collection.

They still mine placer gold much the same way, Justin, only they use modern sluice boxes that work a little better. In some parts if the world they still use mercury, otherwise known as quicksilver to separate the gold. It works well but its a terrible hazard to the environment.

glossary of mining terms page 3 legends of america

Alluvial or Bench Deposits An ancient river-washed rock and gravel bar that may be thousands of feet from the nearest stream, creek, or river. Alluvial or bench deposits contain untapped potential for finding gold because such areas have never been worked before. The hydraulic giants generally worked alluvial deposits.

Bucket Line Dredge Unlike modern dredges; a bucket line dredge was very large. Instead of sucking up water and gravel through the use of water pressure, the bucket line dredges would scoop it up and run it through a long sluice box.

Drywasher A common desert mining tool similar to a highbanker but doesnt need water. It operates by the use of wind. The light junk material is blown off the top of the sluice in the drywasher and the gold stays on the bottom.

Flume A boxing or piping for carrying water. Similar to sluice boxes, but they do not have riffles and are used solely to transport water in areas where a ditch would be impossible such as cliff sides and rocky hillsides.

Highbanker A mobile sluice box. Instead of being put right in the creek, it uses water to pump to transport the water and minerals to another location. It is also able to run more material in less time than the sluice.

Ore Any natural combination of minerals. Especially one from which a metal or metals can be profitably extracted. Commonly a mixture of one or more of the following: quartz, gold, copper, silver, sulfur, iron, and nickel.

Primary or Primitive Rocks Consist of the various kinds of slate, quartz, serpentine, granite and gneiss; they are the lowest group of rocks, are irregularly crystallized, and contain a few animal relics.Prospecting Hunting for mineral lodes or placers.

Rocker Box or Cradle Like a sluice box, the rocker box has riffles in it to trap the gold. It was designed to be used in areas with less water than a sluice box. The process involves pouring water out of a small cup and then rocking the small sluice box like a cradle, thus the name rocker box or cradle.

how to make an inexpensive and efficient gold washer plant and sluice box - binq mining

only what I have found works well, efficiently, and is cheap to build and operate . The sluice box and riffle system, now these have been around for hundreds of to use is going to make your gold recovery more efficient and cost effective, up a wash plant system tailor made to recover that specific size and type of gold

A simple one or two man sluice box, commonly called a 'snipe', is shown on the next page. You can build the big three-box plant from just one and one-half 4' x S' This plant will wash 15 to 20 yards of material a day, with two men shoveling, from the larger rocks and pebbles, permitting more efficient gold separation.

Welcome to GWP, where we make high quality affordable gold wash plants. Each wash plant has 3 proportionately sized sluice boxes utilizing 3 different riffle designs Cleaning out the machine is simple, quick, and efficient, with quick spin

Free Plans to design and build your own dredge, sluice, dry washer; gold Prospecting Equipment: (here are suggestions as to why You might want to own an inexpensive 110V welder Maybe you want to upgrade your old crash box sluice.

Gold trommel wash plant manufacturers located in Helena, MT have over 30 years of excellent gold and gem recovery combined with ease of use, maximizing efficiency sending it into the sluice box, taking with it the gold in the clay as well as the gold Do it right the first time, with a VME-24 gold trommel wash plant.

Our gold trommel mini wash plant will help you move more material & get more gold! Most efficient gold prospecting equipment for the small scale miner. run all 30 buckets without having to clean out the sluice box just make sure that if you

The modem prospector uses an efficient tool called a dry-washer to extract the ever-elusive gold through the riffle tray resembles water flowing through a conventional sluice box. . We did get a little more gold, but we later found out that a few of our . It takes a little more time to haul the material to the wash plant, but that

CONCENTRATION OF PLACER GOLD ORE . 15. Photo 8. PMX test plant with helix and rotary tables . . to wash whole hillsides, were the chief sources of gold for the next 20 years. In 1884 sluice boxes, long toms, jigs, and amalgamation devices, has . others. Most have low capacity and do not efficiently recover

Wash Plant Design Studies and Equipment Examples. Construction of ... also very reliable, inexpensive, and simple to .... SprayotTM otation system to efciently recover ne gold from placer .... gold sphere and processed through a sluice box 14' long and .... Make-up water was drawn from the middle fork of the. Koyukuk ...

21 Jan 2011 It is very important when setting up any wash plant to make sure that where The sluice box was not wide enough to allow for the rate of material that was being dropped into it from the beginning. . A lot of what what we post here and on the gold rush blog is soley based Cheap machine and a marvel.

Gold Pan Rocker Dip-Box Long Tom Sluice Dry Washer (for Desert Areas) . Pumps are commonly used now where power is cheap enough, and the for panning will make a most efficient nesting screen if a close pattern of holes is drilled in More elaborate equipment such as pumps, pipes, hoses, and light plants might

Processing of gold ore using a sluice box, Malaysia However for particles below approximately 75 pm the processing efficiency of most .. processing plant , especially if the gold responds well to standard gravity and They are generally cheap to make, easy to operate and . iii) The sluice feed and wash water rate

Shale rock cliffs & steep hillsides act as a natural sluice box & trap gold over the years You will want to add some classifiers (screens) to your kit to make panning .. your material down to the ideal size for easy and very efficient gold panning. . These are attractive yet inexpensive gold filled Pendants with domed acrylic

mining by Cold Gold Mongolia Ltd. (CGM), using a mobile screening plant and New reduction of truck movements and efficient use of manpower. allowed the New Zealand miners to get the full benefit of the wide riffles without the . Russian-style sluice boxes, and both coarse and fine tailings returned the same result

the sluice cheap to make, easy to use and boasting an unrivalled efficiency of placer mining companies. of the gold lost by the on-board wash-plant of this dredge. (photo: . Hamilton [11] observed Plexiglas-sided sluice boxes and used

26 Jul 2011 This dredging operation is utilizing the 1000-A Wash Plant and the 1000-S efficient, with extremely high recovery rates for fine gold, from 4" Because we have our own mines that we run and we also help others get started in mining. screw separating tables, sluice boxes, wave table and gold pans.

15 Sep 2012 The processing, essentially a large, efficient sluice box that washes away lighter We just want to make sure the water is protected. ounces of gold from each bag, but the initial sluicing is inexpensive enough to The processing depends on water, which carries the crushed rock through the wash plant.

It's no secret that gold mining and sales prospecting are similar processes, they even a valuable gold mine or a great marketing opportunity only a few would know what to do with it. they have to run through their sales sluice box many times they look at me funny. All marketing strategies run dirt through a wash plant.

They are also very reliable, inexpensive and simple to operate. one inch angle iron riffles are required to efficiently recover gold coarser than 1mm. One inch angle iron riffles do not tend to pack as readily as larger angle iron riffles. The first sluice box run is 2' wide X8 ' long of 1 angle iron riffles over Nomad matting,

27 Mar 2013 But there seems to be a real lack of wash plants designed to work with these to a 3 phase motor more moving parts, a gear box more moving parts. The sooner I get rid of the too big to be gold, the less wear and tear on the plant. and operating expenses) and the more efficient the sluice can be.

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1)Low cost. 2)Easy to installation and operation. 3)Less maintenance. 4)Large capacity: A Gold Sluice Box with 1000*6000MM could processing 30-50t/h. 5)Zero consumption: without power and convenient operation. De...

Product Description Yongli gold washing plant used to mine gold mixed with sand in palaeochannel, palaeo-riverbed, alluvial placer, tailing after ball milling, and diamond and zirconium in raw ore. If the percent...

Product Description Yongli gold washing plant used to mine gold mixed with sand in palaeochannel, palaeo-riverbed, alluvial placer, tailing after ball milling, and diamond and zirconium in raw ore. If the percent...

Description: Dam lifter direct sluice gate hoist for hydropower station is widely used in irrigation, hydropower station, the river, irrigation system, reservoirs and other water conservancy project. It consist o...

Heavy duty gate hoist Description: Heavy duty gate hoist is widely used in irrigation, hydropower station, the river, irrigation system, reservoirs and other water conservancy project. It consist of the shell, co...

Article 2E-P.114-99 PASS BOX ( SLUICE ) MAKES IT POSSIBLEFOR PASSING THE ITEMS ANDMATERIALS: Between the rooms with different levels of cleanliness,for example between the room with low cleanliness classto the...

1. Application: The machine is suitable for no road river, mountain & valley area for sedimentary gold washing. 2. Capacity: 15-100t/h 3. Feeding size: <300mm River Gold Mining Equipment 1. Hydraulic motor. 2. Co...

1. Application: Placer gold washing 2. Capacity: 1-5tph 3. Recovery rate: High level Description: This machine is mini gold wash plant, which is suitable for 10-180tph placer gold washing. Besides, this machine i...

Product Description Yongli gold washing plant used to mine gold mixed with sand in palaeochannel, palaeo-riverbed, alluvial placer, tailing after ball milling, and diamond and zirconium in raw ore. If the percent...

Product Description Yongli gold washing plant used to mine gold mixed with sand in palaeochannel, palaeo-riverbed, alluvial placer, tailing after ball milling, and diamond and zirconium in raw ore. If the percent...

Product Description Yongli gold washing plant used to mine gold mixed with sand in palaeochannel, palaeo-riverbed, alluvial placer, tailing after ball milling, and diamond and zirconium in raw ore. If the percent...

Product Description Yongli gold washing plant used to mine gold mixed with sand in palaeochannel, palaeo-riverbed, alluvial placer, tailing after ball milling, and diamond and zirconium in raw ore. If the percent...

Product Description Yongli gold washing plant used to mine gold mixed with sand in palaeochannel, palaeo-riverbed, alluvial placer, tailing after ball milling, and diamond and zirconium in raw ore. If the percent...

sluice boxes

The technology of sluice-boxes has changed a bit over the decades but the fundamentals of letting mother nature do the hard work for you in separating the gold from the waste gravel still remain the same. SLUICE BOXES ARE BELOW SCROLL DOWN TO VIEWGold Sluice boxes are available in a variety of styles and sizes. From the light weight and ultra portable Tee Dee EZ sluice to our heavy duty aluminum Keene sluice boxes. Don't miss our portable folding sluice box. Gas and electric Power Sluices and Highbankers are also available. We have all the best stream sluices and a ton of other gold prospecting equipment to help you find and recover more gold. Various sluicebox carpeting options, including Miners Moss and ribbed vinyl matting, can also be found here for those of you who like to experiment and tweak your fine gold recovery. Don't forget to add your scoops, snuffer bottles, and classifier screens too! These are inexpensive add-ons that make sluicing for gold much easier and more productive too.

We have all the best stream sluices and a ton of other gold prospecting equipment to help you find and recover more gold. Various sluicebox carpeting options, including Miners Moss and ribbed vinyl matting, can also be found here for those of you who like to experiment and tweak your fine gold recovery.

Search Gold Fever Prospecting for: Sign up for The "Gold-Fever-Prospecting Newsletter" and we'll enter you for FREE into our monthly GOLD GIVE AWAY! Join the Gold Fever Prospecting mailing list Email: Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Search Gold Fever Prospecting for: Sign up for The "Gold-Fever-Prospecting Newsletter" and we'll enter you for FREE into our monthly GOLD GIVE AWAY! Join the Gold Fever Prospecting mailing list Email: Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Sign up for The "Gold-Fever-Prospecting Newsletter" and we'll enter you for FREE into our monthly GOLD GIVE AWAY! Join the Gold Fever Prospecting mailing list Email: Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Sign up for The "Gold-Fever-Prospecting Newsletter" and we'll enter you for FREE into our monthly GOLD GIVE AWAY! Join the Gold Fever Prospecting mailing list Email: Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Join the Gold Fever Prospecting mailing list Email: Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Gold Prospecting Questions? EMAIL USCopyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

Copyright 2020 Motherlode Outfittersdba: Gold Fever ProspectingHenderson, NV 89074Toll Free: 888-985-6463VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map

VISIT US ON FACEBOOKREAD THE GOLD FEVER BLOG Gold Prospecting Equipment / Buy Gold Nuggets Gold Panning Paydirt / Mining T-Shirts Drywashers / Metal DetectorsSuction Dredging for GoldBrowse Site Map