trommel screen hardware

trommel compost sifter : 7 steps (with pictures) - instructables

This Instructable shows how to build a trommel (rotary screen) for sifting compost or shredded leaves. The purpose of sifting is to separate coarse unfinished compost materials from the finished product or to separate out trash and debris from other organic materials before use in the garden. My city has trucks that go around sucking up all the leaves in the fall. These leaves are then placed in a huge pile and allowed to decompose. I can go get decomposed leaves from them as needed but they often contain trash and rocks that need removed so I'm planning to use this trommel to sift that material as well as compost. Sifting also makes organic materials appear more uniform which is desirable if you are using them as a top dressing or mulch.

Materials needed: - 1/2 inch hardware cloth - two large surplus bicycle rims - 4 rollers and bolts to attach - a little over 8 feet of dimensional lumber - misc. wires for connecting the hardware cloth to the rims

The fastest way is to cut them if you have some really strong wire or chain cutters. I used a really ancient fencing tool and that worked great! NOTE: You may also want to save the spokes to make plant markers.

My rims (inside) measured about 21.4 inches in diameter so multiplying 21.4 x pi gives me a 67.2 inch minimum length. Add about 4 inches for overlap of the seam and cut at about 71 inches. I used standard 36 inch width hardware cloth.

Place the hardware cloth inside the rims and attach with wires through the spoke holes. I used plastic coated #14 household electrical wire. To fasten the seam of the tube I used #18 wire. (Be careful not to over tighten the wire or the wire will break.) Make sure the wire on the outside of the rim is lying flat so that the rollers don't bump over it.

This is a pretty simple structure so I won't go into a lot of detail. I used 2x6 lumber because I happened to have several short pieces on hand that were just the right size, but 2x4s should work fine too and would be a little lighter. My side pieces are 34 inches long and the ends are 19 inches long which leaves a gap of 16 inches in the middle. Note that one end needs to be ripped down 2.5 inches lower than the other because the drum needs to overrun the box slightly so that the coarse materials spill out of the drum. Since I used 2x6s (1.5 x 5.5) my spillway end piece was 3 inches wide. If you are using 2x4s (1.5x3.5) Then your end piece would need to be one inch wide. Note that these dimensions assume that you are using the same diameter rims that I used. If you use different size rims then obviously you will need to modify the dimensions to accommodate your particular arc. To align your rollers place the finished drum onto the roller box and then mark your roller positions. You may want to attach the rollers first with simple drywall screws (as I did) to test their positioning and then drill and bolt them later once you are happy with the alignment.

Once the roller box is complete you are ready to try the trommel out. Mine fits perfectly on top of my wheelbarrow which is handy so you may want to take your wheelbarrow size into account when planning your dimensions. You could also place the trommel on sawhorses or make permanent legs if you prefer. Just make sure the output side of the trommel is slightly downhill from the input side.If you have a large quantity of material to screen you may want to find a buddy who will keep turning the drum while you continue shoveling jmaterial. If you are working alone then you will have to load a couple shovelfuls into the drum and then give it a few turns yourself before loading more compost. Or if you are really mechanically inclined you could figure out how to hook up an electric motor like this guy did.

Once I tried the trommel out I discovered that if you pile a couple shovelfuls of material in the uphill end of the drum and then turn it yourself some of the coarse material tends to spill uphill and out of the drum. To solve this problem I made a simple partition out of plywood to prevent this from happening. I don't think this would be a problem when operating the trommel with a buddy since the material wouldn't build up into such a large pile as you have when working alone.

The best distance - gives the best combination of support and stability - is whatever puts the supporting wheels so they are about 90 degrees apart on the rims. If you draw lines from center of trommel through the axle of the support wheels, it should be a right angle.

Wow, that's really awesome! It looks like it might be a bit awkward to retrieve the sifted fines from the drawer. Have you considered designing it so that the fines would drop directly into a wheel barrow or your tractor bucket? By the way, what is the device shown in picture 100_1360? ( http://steveandlizthompson.shutterfly.com/88#114)

This trommel exceeded my expectations. It was easy to build, and is MUCH easier to operate than my old compost sifter. Compost can be sifted as fast as it can be shoveled in. With an assistant, I was able to sift about 8 cubic yards of compost last weekend. In two more weekends, the entire pile (35 feet long and 15 feet wide) will be sifted. Everyone with a sizeable compost pile would do well to build one of these. Incidentally, I added 2 aluminum strips (about 1.5" wide, with an "L" profile) to the inside of the screen, to help lift compost as the drum turns. But I don't think these pieces made much difference.

Fantastic Instructable! I just made my own, fitted to the top of the empty third section of my compost bin with recycled bed frame wheels. Thanks so much for posting, it has already saved the strain on my back!

I've made this and love it. I love it, the compost loves it, my back loves it, the neighbor kids love it. I used 2x3 from Lowe's because it's way less expensive and I enjoy the "weathered" look that the frame has. Also had to use swivel casters due to no rigid casters available at the time. They still work if they're pointed in towards the wheels. Zip-ties were used instead of wire but it does make it quite bumpy on account of the locking end of the tie lies within the groove of the rim. I think this helps a little by jarring the load every few degrees of rotation, however I reused the rim liner and this has reduced the bumping a bit. I told my dad about it and he wants to build one too. Maybe I'll expand on this idea some. Great 'able, thanks!

Very late posting a thanks, but thanks. Well written and a nice idea. I came across a non-functional wheelchair. The handrims make for a nice way to rotate the device and keep the material turning inside a little longer, which I find beneficial. Yours is the first instructable I ever built. Thanks again for sharing your idea. The supports are two simple Aldo Leopold benches that have many uses. Plans can be found by searching "ALDO LEOPOLD BENCH". I found them here:http://www.epa.gov/greatlakes/greenacres/wildones/wo27bench.html

Excellent Instructable. Consider unscrewing the spokes from the rim rather than cutting them. Ends are not a sharp and less metal is lost. The inside of the rim should have a spoke holder that you can unscrew with a slotted screwdriver.

I used tin snips, ant they worked well!I also found free bike tire rims from a local bike co-op. They also suggested the local metal recycle business for free bike tire rims.I got 26" rims free. (24.5" inside diameter for 77" hardware cloth minimum length)Thanks for this well built instructable. (I always want to read this as Indestructable!)

mobile jaw, impact & cone rock crushers - screening plants - trommels - conveyors

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trommel screens | screens for bark and compost materials

WSM Titan Trommel Screens provide precise classification of a wide range of material, with multiple classifications available from just one unit. WSM Trommel Screens are ideal for screening bark and compost materials for use as landscaping and soil amendment products.

WSM offers a wide range of sizes and capacities, custom-built one at a time and tailored to the needs of individual customers. Our screens are available in 4, 6, 8, and 10 drum diameters and lengths from 15 to 63 with production capacities of up to 600 cubic yards per hour. Built for heavy-duty applications, WSM Titan Trommels are designed to provide years of trouble-free separation.

Multiple screen sizes available for multiple product separation points. Full covers allow access to multiple screen sections at one time to make periodic inspection simple and screen replacement faster. Covers feature a sealing system.

WSM Titan Trommel Screens represent an evolution in manufacturing skill and technique. Proprietary WSM design and fabrication innovations enable the Titan Trommel to provide screening volumes unheard of elsewhere. Titan Trommels are build one at a time, tailored to needs to individual customers for severe duty application. As a premier trommel screen manufacturer, we have the knowledge and experience to help solve your screening needs.

Our line of WSM Trommel Screens provides the exact classification of a comprehensive range of materials and offers exceptional screening for bark and compost materials your business can use in landscaping and soil amendment products.

To discover what the full range of WSM Trommel Screens can mean for your business simply complete the contact form to receive your Free PDF. A member of our team will also contact you after a couple of days to answer any questions.

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how to make a homemade trommel compost sifter eco snippets

Hereshow to build a trommel (rotary screen) for sifting compost or shredded leaves. The purpose of sifting is to separate coarse unfinished compost materials from the finished product or to separate out trash and debris from other organic materials before use in the garden.

My city has trucks that go around sucking up all the leaves in the fall. These leaves are then placed in a huge pile and allowed to decompose. I can go get decomposed leaves from them as needed but they often contain trash and rocks that need removed so Im planning to use this trommel to sift that material as well as compost. Sifting also makes organic materials appear more uniform which is desirable if you are using them as a top dressing or mulch.

My rims (inside) measured about 21.4 inches in diameter so multiplying 21.4 x pi gives me a 67.2 inch minimum length. Add about 4 inches for overlap of the seam and cut at about 71 inches. I used standard 36 inch width hardware cloth.

Place the hardware cloth inside the rims and attach with wires through the spoke holes. I used plastic coated #14 household electrical wire. To fasten the seam of the tube I used #18 wire. (Be careful not to over tighten the wire or the wire will break.) Make sure the wire on the outside of the rim is lying flat so that the rollers dont bump over it.

This is a pretty simple structure so I wont go into a lot of detail. I used 26 lumber because I happened to have several short pieces on hand that were just the right size, but 2x4s should work fine too and would be a little lighter.

My side pieces are 34 inches long and the ends are 19 inches long which leaves a gap of 16 inches in the middle. Note that one end needs to be ripped down 2.5 inches lower than the other because the drum needs to overrun the box slightly so that the coarse materials spill out of the drum. Since I used 2x6s (1.5 x 5.5) my spillway end piece was 3 inches wide. If you are using 2x4s (1.53.5) Then your end piece would need to be one inch wide.

Note that these dimensions assume that you are using the same diameter rims that I used. If you use different size rims then obviously you will need to modify the dimensions to accommodate your particular arc.

To align your rollers place the finished drum onto the roller box and then mark your roller positions. You may want to attach the rollers first with simple drywall screws (as I did) to test their positioning and then drill and bolt them later once you are happy with the alignment.

Once the roller box is complete you are ready to try the trommel out. Mine fits perfectly on top of my wheelbarrow which is handy so you may want to take your wheelbarrow size into account when planning your dimensions. You could also place the trommel on sawhorses or make permanent legs if you prefer. Just make sure the output side of the trommel is slightly downhill from the input side.

If you have a large quantity of material to screen you may want to find a buddy who will keep turning the drum while you continue shoveling material. If you are working alone then you will have to load a couple shovelfuls into the drum and then give it a few turns yourself before loading more compost.

Once I tried the trommel out I discovered that if you pile a couple shovelfuls of material in the uphill end of the drum and then turn it yourself some of the coarse material tends to spill uphill and out of the drum.

To solve this problem I made a simple partition out of plywood to prevent this from happening. I dont think this would be a problem when operating the trommel with a buddy since the material wouldnt build up into such a large pile as you have when working alone (via Instructables).

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what is a trommel? (with pictures)

A trommel is a rotating drum with a screen that allows fine material to fall through while retaining larger materials. Trommels are useful in the processing of a wide variety of solids, particles, and mixtures. They come in an assortment of sizes to meet different manufacturing needs and can be used with accessory components to increase functionality, if necessary. Some industries that utilize trommels include the mining, gravel processing, and solid waste management fields.

To operate a trommel, a technician can start an engine that rotates the drum and then add material through an intake chute. It is possible to keep the device in continuous operation by adding more to the chute while the drum processes. As the drum turns, it aerates the materials inside. The smaller particulates fall towards the bottom and out the bottom of the screen, while larger materials work their way toward the opposite end, and eventually out the end and into an exit hopper.

It is possible to use conveyors with a trommel to move the fine and larger particulates. At a facility like a gravel processing plant, rock can move through a series of progressively coarser screens to yield different grades of rock. These can move from very small fill gravel to much larger chunks. Each grade contains rocks within a narrow set of parameters; smaller rocks fell out during earlier processing, while larger rocks were retained and moved along the conveyor.

Another tool some companies may opt to use with a trommel is a pulverizer. Pulverizers crush rock, stone, and other materials into smaller pieces. They can feed crushed materials into a trommel for sorting to generate a continuous supply of rock of a given size. These devices can connect to hoppers that directly load bags or trucks for transport, in settings where a facility processes materials for sale or shipment to other locations.

Mining, rock processing, and similar industries use these devices. They can also be useful in waste management, and on job sites, where workers can set up a portable device. Portability allows workers to sort through the materials they find on side, instead of having to ship them to a remote location. Small sizes typically have weaker motors and may not be able to process high volumes of material, but may be acceptable for basic applications like geotechnical exploration sites where geologists want to process material to determine if the site merits further investigation.

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

Ever since she began contributing to the site several years ago, Mary has embraced the exciting challenge of being a researcher and writer. Mary has a liberal arts degree from Goddard College and spends her free time reading, cooking, and exploring the great outdoors.

@allenJo - Speaking of buying stuff from the store, sometimes I buy topsoil from the local hardware soil. I am afraid that the quality of the soil that I get is not good. Honestly, its only good for filler, thats all. What do I mean by that? Instead of soil, I get mostly rocks, twigs, grass clippings and weeds. There is very little soil in the mix. I am pretty sure that they used a trommel to create the topsoil but I dont think that they did a very good job. I get better results creating my own topsoil by finding empty patches of lawn and digging that up, to be honest with you.

Honestly, its only good for filler, thats all. What do I mean by that? Instead of soil, I get mostly rocks, twigs, grass clippings and weeds. There is very little soil in the mix. I am pretty sure that they used a trommel to create the topsoil but I dont think that they did a very good job. I get better results creating my own topsoil by finding empty patches of lawn and digging that up, to be honest with you.

Honestly, its only good for filler, thats all. What do I mean by that? Instead of soil, I get mostly rocks, twigs, grass clippings and weeds. There is very little soil in the mix. I am pretty sure that they used a trommel to create the topsoil but I dont think that they did a very good job. I get better results creating my own topsoil by finding empty patches of lawn and digging that up, to be honest with you.

There is very little soil in the mix. I am pretty sure that they used a trommel to create the topsoil but I dont think that they did a very good job. I get better results creating my own topsoil by finding empty patches of lawn and digging that up, to be honest with you.

There is very little soil in the mix. I am pretty sure that they used a trommel to create the topsoil but I dont think that they did a very good job. I get better results creating my own topsoil by finding empty patches of lawn and digging that up, to be honest with you.

@SkyWhisperer - Thats okay if you just want to filter your rocks. But you cant create smooth stones using your homemade device. For that you will need a pulverizer. I dont know if they sell those at home improvement stores. I tend to think that these machines are limited to industrial use. They require a lot of power and of course they can be very dangerous. In that case, youre pretty much out of luck, but I think you can just buy the smooth stones from a local supply store if you need them.

I dont know if they sell those at home improvement stores. I tend to think that these machines are limited to industrial use. They require a lot of power and of course they can be very dangerous. In that case, youre pretty much out of luck, but I think you can just buy the smooth stones from a local supply store if you need them.

I dont know if they sell those at home improvement stores. I tend to think that these machines are limited to industrial use. They require a lot of power and of course they can be very dangerous. In that case, youre pretty much out of luck, but I think you can just buy the smooth stones from a local supply store if you need them.

Trommels are used in creating gravel driveways too. Gravel driveways are made of gravel with varying grades of coarseness or smoothness. With a trommel you can change the grade of the stones so that it is more or less smooth, according to your liking. You can get a simple trommel from a home improvement store, or build one yourself using different materials. Of course the important part of the trommel is the screen. Youll have to adjust the size according to the size of the rocks. You can then rotate the cylinder manually and it will begin to filter out the rocks and you will have smooth gravel for your driveway.

You can get a simple trommel from a home improvement store, or build one yourself using different materials. Of course the important part of the trommel is the screen. Youll have to adjust the size according to the size of the rocks. You can then rotate the cylinder manually and it will begin to filter out the rocks and you will have smooth gravel for your driveway.

You can get a simple trommel from a home improvement store, or build one yourself using different materials. Of course the important part of the trommel is the screen. Youll have to adjust the size according to the size of the rocks. You can then rotate the cylinder manually and it will begin to filter out the rocks and you will have smooth gravel for your driveway.

how to build a motorized trommeland why on earth you would want to

Brian's the earth-biscuit type, with a flop of blond hair and a kayak rack on his Jeep that he actually uses. He's a community-garden aficionado and a yard farmer who could talk compost for hoursmostly because there's a massive heap of it in his backyard. Brian's compost pile is the Everest of our neighborhood. It is robust of scent and full of twigs, old pineapple rinds, his Australian shepherd's buried rawhide chews, and gigantic mounds of last year's oak leaves. And buried deep inside is some of the best compost Mother Earth has ever cooked.

A few years ago Brian built a manual compost sifter, just a big screen within a frame, and he shook small batches of compost through it, separating the fine material from whatever hadn't finished breaking down. He used the rich matter to top-dress his lawn, which improves moisture retention and soil structure, and to make his flower and veggie beds go nuts. He reduced the size of his compost mound and made room for the fall leaf drop in our neighborhood.

Then Brian unearthed an old rock bed left behind by a previous owner and thought about how great those rocks would look on the other side of the yardbut first the bed would need to be sifted and cleaned. The very thought of putting it all through his manual sifter nearly put him in traction. So he hit the Internet to find a better solution.

You know how it goes. You start a project, then halfway through Saturday you're surrounded by tools and a half-finished mess. Brian had watched hours of YouTube videos by guys who'd successfully built mechanical trommels before himguys like Paul Miller of La Mesa, California.

He watched as Paul framed a basic cylinder with bike rims and screening, then mounted it on a wooden frame with smaller wheels turning the sieve within the rims. Atop the structure he mounted a motor. The whole thing sat at an angle, so when Paul shoveled rough material into the higher end, the cylinder dropped fine material below and dumped chunky debris into a wheelbarrow or hopper.Brian got to work on the cylinder first:

1. Use three 24- to 26-inch bicycle rims for the cylinder frame. Brian grabbed his from the local bicycle collective. When I interviewed him, Paul said a friend who fixes bikes donated his. You get the idea.

He wasn't sure. Other projects filled his workshop. The trommel took a back seat. Eventually, Brian moved the cylinder into the backyard, where he felt bad about it for two years. The compost pile grew and grew.

Like I said, Brian's green-living credo is pretty infectious. I wanted to help him finish his trommel, so I figured I'd start at the heart of the problem: the motor. Lucky for us, our other neighbor, John, is a mechanical engineer for a major international manufacturer.

"The goal here is not to slow down the motor but to control a properly sized energy source," John says. The rotational speed of the trommel is critical for safety. About 20 or 25 rpm would be plenty. Plus, lowering the machine's speed would increase its torquethe twisting force that creates rotationallowing Brian to sift larger piles of compost.

A basic -hp electric motor spinning at 500 rpm is obviously too fast to couple directly to a trommel. Additionally, that same motor creates about 5 lb-ft of torque, which is not enough to do the job. To make the motor work, John says the easiest solution is to purchase a speed reducer. These affordable, mass-produced units are readily available from industrial distributors and many websites. Essentially a speed reducer is a gearbox.

"In addition to reducing the speed to a manageable level, it'll increase the torque," John says. "The neat thing about gears is that when you arrange them such that the output speed is reduced, the torque increases inversely." For example, if you connect a 500-rpm motor to a speed reducer, and the output speed is now 25 rpm, or 0 of the original speed, your torque now increases by a factor of 20.

"Industrial supply houses and motor distributors can help you put a nice little package together," he says. "Ask an electrician to make sure your circuit is wired correctly to withstand the load from the motor."

Instead of using a speed reducer, Paul, the YouTube guy, rigged up a machine using the trommel's center rim for speed control. "I used a 21-inch bike rim as a pulley wheel to step down the rpms of the motor," he says. Other trommel builders use a 1,750-rpm motor with a 2-inch pulley (A) going to a 10-inch pulley (B), then a 2-inch pulley (C) going to the 25-inch trommel frame (D).

1. The size of the frame will depend on the size of your cylinder and the position of the wheels you use to turn the cylinder within it. Brian planned to mount his trommel on caster wheels from the local Habitat for Humanity ReStore, but you could also use small wheels with an axle from a home store.

2. Frames are best made from 2 x 4 material with a plywood top that's sturdy enough to attach the motor to. (One YouTube builder made his motor mount adjustable for height because his pulley belts stretched out over time and he wanted to be able to tighten them.)

3. Screw the wheels directly to the frame to turn the cylinder. Paul Miller recommends just screwing the caster into the middle of a 2 x 4 and lining up the caster wheel with the middle of the bike rim, repeating on all four sides at each end. "There was no planning or measuring involved," says Miller. "I just basically built a square around the rims."

5. Here's where you can customize. Some of the YouTube builders added a piece of sheet metal as a guard on one side of the trommel so it doesn't fling dirt and debris all over the yard. Some builders crafted different drums for different purposessmaller screens for composting, larger screening for rock jobs. Others made the trommel contraption high enough that it could be directly positioned over raised garden beds to reduce the amount of shoveling required.

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building a trommel screen | conscious compost

This do-it-yourself compost sifter pairs nicely with a community-scale composting operation found at community gardens and farms. For a basic primer on aerated static pile composting check out my posts Aerated Static Pile Composting, Design & Build of Solar Powered Aerated Compost 3-Bin, and Supplies for a Basic Aerated Static Pile Setup.

Ive worked at a number of scales in the composting industry, including Fleet Manager for a large mulch and compost producer where I maintained the repairs for over $8 million in equipment (tub grinders, trommels, wheel loaders, semi trucks, etc.). Additionally, I spent my youth around farms and industrial machinery so designing and building this trommel came with fewer road blocks than others might have. Thats why Ive put this article together, to help the gardens and micro-enterprises develop a sifter, more specifically a trommel that fits your needs.

Ive wanted to build a trommel since I first strained my back screening compost over a sheet of hardware cloth. In many gardens screening or sifting is the overlooked part of the equation. Id spend hours over the course of a growing season making wonderful compost, but when it came time to sift compost for the garden I didnt have a good solution.

Equipment manufacturers in the compost industry cater to medium and large scale compost and soil producers. This makes good sense since the economics of composting generally requires large equipment. Granted there are smaller machines, such as the Sittler, that are made for landscaping services, soil blending businesses, farms, and so on, but they can carry a price tag that is difficult for a small start-up.

I started by researching DIY trommels and collected notes on design considerations. Having managed a fleet of equipment which included (8) 40 foot long trommels I knew that this project would be cutting out most of the nice features of trommels used in the industry. No conveyors, no input hopper, no brush to clean the screen and definitely no powder coated steel.

Popular mechanics ran a great article on building a trommel. I recommend you read it if youre serious about building one. That article also referred to some YouTubers (David Waltmans version and Geoff Babcocks version) with their iterations of trommels. I pulled screenshots of all the designs I liked and noted how certain areas were handled. I also looked at several videos I had of a Jet worm harvester to figure out a good rpm.

The design of the trommel drum is the most challenging part of the design/build process. The cylinder/drum/trommel is the part that does the work. It needs to be suspended in the frame while also having as little rolling friction as possible. Since it is going to be tilted it needs to be held in place to prevent it from sliding out as it rolls.

For my purposes I wanted the machine to have easily replaceable screens. I had two ideas for doing this and chose a method that I had seen in the past. I found a make a clamp kit online. The kit comes with pipe clamps and 50 feet of stainless steel banding. I used these to cut custom length pipe clamps which wrap around the screen and clamp the screen onto the aluminum ring.

Since the mesh does not act as structure (in some designs the hardware cloth is used to support itself) I needed to figure out a way to create a roundish structure without special metal fabricating equipment. To make the trommel round I went with the obvious solution, bike rims. I used the bike rims to fit 3 inch wide aluminum bands to the inside of the rims.

I used 27 bike rims that I picked up from a non-profit bike shop. If you look for rims made by Araya which were prevalent on late 70s through 80s road bikes youll be good. My trommel has five 27 Araya rims. They are close to the same inner diameter.

To bend the aluminum bands I used two 4x4s in the voids of two CMU blocks. This was a total guessing game. I just bent the metal a small amount at a time until I got a slow arc. Then repeated until it was almost a ring. I used a hack saw to trim the ring down to size.

I drilled through the rim and into the aluminum bands and used low profile bolt heads to bolt the two together. The 3 inch wide band creates a flange on both sides of the rim. This gives space to mount the screen. It also gives a place to put support wheels. The bike rim gives roundness and prevents the trommel from sliding off.

The rings are connected to four aluminum angles that run the full length of the screen. To help the screen do a better job of screening material I used 1 angle aluminum to carry material up the screen and drop it as the drum rotates.

The trommel is the core of the machine. I designed around it. I knew I would be using hardware cloth as my screen. They come in three widths at my local hardware store, 2 feet, 3 feet and 4 feet. The width of the screen informs the length of the trommel, which tells me which length lumber I should use for the frame.

To reduce wood waste and save time, I designed the frame to use dimensions that come standard from the lumber yard. I went with a low height, with the intention of using plastic tubs under the screen. Some gardens may want to fit a wheelbarrow or gang of wheelbarrows under the trommel, plan for this in advance by ensuring youll have the clearance needed for a wheelbarrow to roll under the trommel. I added corrugated metal as a chute to send compost fines down into the tubs and reduce the mess. This is an area I would change as I mention below under Improvements.

Finally, the drive mechanism. The trommel needs to rotate. There are several ways to add power transmission to the screen. You can use the support wheels to drive the drum, you can use a belt drive or chain drive, or you can put a gear on the outside diameter of the screen.

Another key component to the trommel is final RPM. How fast should it spin? I looked at trommels spinning on YouTube and counted their RPM. Somewhere between 10 and 20 RPM seems like the best fit. Mine is a little on the slower side at 12ish RPM. Im ok with that because I have the occasional worm that I dont want to hurt if it goes through the screen.

To reduce the RPM of my 1725 rpm 1/4hp motor I used belts and pulleys. There are calculators online that will help you figure out your speed reduction. Just hit up Google and ask for pulley calculator. To figure out the length of belts to use, check Google for v-belt calculator. An online calculator will ask you the distance from center point to center point of each pulley. It will also ask for pulley diameters. It will tell you the length belt to use!

The motor is attached to the top of the frame. It has a diameter output shaft. OnMcMaster-CarrI purchased two 1- diameter pulleys, a 10 diameter pulley, a 12 long D-profile steel shaft, and two pillow block bearings for shaft. The pillow block bearings are mounted to aluminum to reduce binding between the bearings.

To drive the compost trommel I originally intended to run the belt between two bike rims. When I tested this out it slipped and couldnt turn the drum. So I put the belt in the groove of the rim and it worked like a charm.

I bought some replacement electric cord at the hardware store and ran it to a plastic, weatherproof junction box. Inside the box is a typical light switch which can handle the amperage of the motor. I used weatherproof cord grips to keep the elements out of the box. The cord is clamped to the frame, which ensures it wont get wound up in the moving parts.

Hey, I cant complain. I built this trommel for under $500. It works well and it eliminates a bottleneck in the garden. Ive been using a screen on the first section and screen on the second section. The trommel screens about 2 cubic yards of input volume in an hour (depending on how dry the compost is). Finally, I can swap out screen sizes with relative ease.

topsoil screeners idm

DeSite SLG Vibratory Screeners are the most affordable way to screen and recycle sand, soil, and gravel. DeSite screeners are #1 in value and efficiency. We manufacture 4 model sizes ranging in price from $5,750 to $13,900 usd

Our screeners can be fed efficiently with a bucket tractor, skid steer, excavator, backhoe or wheel loader. Designed with a screen deck wider than your machines bucket, SLG screeners are easier to feed and produce more product each and every hour. DeSite screeners low maintenance design means more time screening with less service and repair.

Our SLG screeners offer many special features as standard equipment at no extra cost. Our Tilting Screen Decks, Cantilevered Coil Over Spring Suspension, Tilt Open Feed Deflector and Removable Riser Box give the operator more control, resulting in bigger production. We offer mesh sizes from 1/8 to 4 inches in both square and elongated for screener versatility.

Our machines portability is unmatched by any other design out there. DeSite has designed in fork pockets and bucket lift extensions that allow SLG screeners to be moved in literally seconds with forks or a bucket. Keeping the screener close to the pile being screened is critical to good production when using compact equipment to feed the screener.

Screening machine maintenance is much like forklift maintenance. They often only work part time so they only get maintained when they are broken. DeSite understands this so we have designed our machines to be virtually maintenance free. Our vibratory packs are electric powered and sealed away from dirt and dust. The power source can be up to 100ft away from dirt and dust, keeping maintenance to a minimum. DeSite 78VF machines have no grease points, while the 68V has only two and the 108VFRB has only four grease points. Less maintenance means less down time, higher production and lower operating costs.

Deck screeners are definitely more versatile than a trommel. Deck screeners can screen aggregate, and heavy rock, which is usually not recommended for trommel drums. Screener versatility often boils down to screening a variety of products and product sizes. The ease of a mesh size change out will determine whether the operator will take the time to change the mesh and make a variety of products.

SLG screeners use a hooked mesh design and C style clamps to stretch and hold the mesh in place over the crowned screen deck. Our design puts the tensioning bolts on the sides of the deck where they are easily accessible. Mesh change out on the 68 and 78 take less than 15 minutes. The 108vfrb design will take 30 to 40 minutes.

DeSite has the only design that brings the deck slope all the way up to 45 degrees to stop screen plugging when screening extreme moisture materials. Our machines then can bring the slope all the way back to 25 degrees for screening aggregates and sand.

No other manufacture has made the investment to design a small compact vibratory screening machine for the compact tractor market. The SLG 68V has brought screen and recycling independence to nurseries, farms and land owners that own compact tractors. Our SLG 78VF topsoil screeners are the number one seller in North America when customers are using skid steers, tractors, excavators and compact loaders. Our design is very efficient, out performing anything in its class for a price that is far below what other in the industry want for their product. The DeSite SLG 108VFRB with over 60 sq/ft of screening area is the most cost effective vibratory screener for excavators, backhoes, and wheel loaders. Built tough and built to last, the SLG 108VFRB screener is bringing screen and recycling independence to the market at a price of only $13,900.00usd.

trommel screens

ISO 9001:2000 certified. Design, fabrication and installation of rotary trommel screens. Oscillation screens, disc and star screeners are available in different specifications. Suitable for screening sawmill waste such as wood chips, sawdust, wood shavings (animal bedding), bark and alternative fuel (RDF).

Custom manufacturer of flexible design cylindrical rotating wedge wire trommel screens. Used to separate solids from liquids or solids from solids. Serves the sugar, fruit processing, mineral, fertilizer, abattoirs and water treatment industries.

Custom manufacturer of trommel screens for recycling and energy conversion. Available in up to 8 in. dia. Capabilities include milling, turning, boring, blasting and peening. Finishing, reconditioning and repair services are also offered. Serves the pulp and paper, pharmaceutical, food processing, hydro, aerospace, waste management, solar, defense, mining and coil winding industries.

Lean manufacturing capable & ISO 9001:2000 certified manufacturer of standard & custom partition, suction, trommel, intake & filter screens. Available in perforated materials including stainless steel, aluminum, carbon steel, galvanized steel, aluminized steel, brass, copper & plastic. Other fabricated products such as exhaust tubes & baffles, grilles, engine guards, roof decking, doors, filters, ceiling tiles & diffusers, light diffusers & store fixtures are also available. JIT delivery available.

Complete designing & manufacturer of trommels with rotary screens for screening solid waste. Features of trommels include resisting accumulations of sticks, wire, rags, sheet & damp fines in screening equipment, moving undersize particles through a specially designed screen by tumbling action, propelling oversized materials out of discharge chute & constantly exposing undersize materials to screen surface. Applications of rotascreen include municipal solid waste recycling, recycling of oversized tire shreds & building materials, ash handling & composting systems.

Distributor of trommel screens. Products include trommel screens, high speed grinders, slow speed shredders, compost & foundry equipment. Products line also includes tracked impact crushers, cone crushers & tracked screens. Used equipment is available. Products are suitable for commercial, industrial & municipal applications.

Custom manufacturer of assemblies, wire, baskets, blanks, wire cloth, coils, partitions, fabrics, mesh, netting, wire panels, plates, screens, sheets and rolls. Also distributes bar, plank, welded steel, pressure locked, riveted, reticuline, I-bar, swage lock, extruded plank and safety gratings. Expanded and perforated metals such as stainless steel, galvanized steel, carbon steel, aluminum, bronze, brass and copper available. CNC cutting, punching and fabrication services are offered. Suitable for sound abatement, grill, peanut and tobacco screen, HVAC duct liner, acoustical ceiling panel, security screen, machine guard, outdoor furniture, air filter, site barrier, strainer, diffuser, speaker grill, catwalk, walkway, bridge decking and other applications. Stock items available. Same day shipping.

Manufacturer & distributor of trommel screens & filters, rotary vacuum drum filters, high flow pumps, & industrial machinery for the sugar, paper, & chemical industry. Also serve as international purchasing agents & traders for industrial & material sourcing all across the globe.

Manufacturer of heavy equipment that includes aerial work platforms, asphalt paving & production equipment, compact construction equipment, concrete paving & production equipment, cranes, light towers, material handlers, telehandlers, highway trucks, portal equipment and material processing equipment. Services include equipment financing, Trade-in & Like-Kind Exchange programs, ownership and lease options. Industries include construction, infrastructure, quarrying, recycling, shipping, transportation, refining and utility.s

Manufacturer of vibratory and trommel screens. Shredding applications for tires, rubber, wood, plastics, and electronic waste. Screens come in a large diameter split design. Recirculating split trommel screens come in diameters of 2-12. Screens come with 4 down to 80 mesh, electric, hydraulic, balanced crank, and pneumatic drives. Vibratory screens come in multiple stages, up to 3 stages, and have electric and pneumatic vibrators. Can be custom built to meet specifications.

Manufacturer of trommel screens. Trommel screens are available in either trunnion or center axle style. Trunnion style trommels are used for sorting any mix of recyclables in a variety of screen opening sizes with no inside frame members for any debris to collect on. Dimensions of the screen drum range 36 in. - 72 in. dia. x 10 ft. long, with the overall dimensions being 7 ft. - 2 in. x 12 ft. - 6 in. long. Center axle style trommels are designed for sizing broken glass or cleaning debris from sorted loose contrainers such as aluminum cans or plastic bottles. Dimensions are 36 in. dia. x 90 in. long drum for the sorting & sizing.

Manufacturer of machinery for logging, recycling, demolition, solid waste, and related industries. Products include forwarders, harvesters, processing heads, firewood processors, tub and horizontal grinders and trommel screens.

Manufacturer of standard & custom material separation & recovery/destruction systems including hammermill, separating & trommel screens. Designed for recovering precious metals from computers & telecommunications scrap, nylon from carpet, recyclables & mis-packaged consumer products such as breakfast cereals, cosmetics, milk & juice containers. Also available vibrating, rotary & magnetic screens. Services include preventive maintenance, ovehauling, technical support, mobile services, turnkey installation & training services.

ISO 9001:2008 certified custom fabricator of trommel screens including coal, coke, gravel & sand screens for mining applications. Conveyor trays, punch & vibrating plates & sorters are also available. JIT services. Flexible stock programs.

Manufacturer & distributor of fine mesh hooked screens for pit & quarry, stone screening & trommel applications. Screens have hooked & formed edges & are used on vibrating screen decks. Ring for circular separators are also available.

Manufacturing Specialist In Weaving & Fabricating Industrial Wire Cloth: Shearing, Blanking, Extruding, Calendering, Welding, Soldering & Other Fabricating Services. Wire Cloth In Steel, Galvanized, Tinned, Copper, Brass, Bronze, Nickel, Monel, Inconel, Stainless Steel, Aluminum, Alloy, Spring Steel, Titanium, Tantalum. Baskets, Trays, Liners, Filters, Strainers, Screens, Vibrator Screen Sections & Other Components For Numerous Industries

Stocking distributor of tracked & wheeled trommel screens. Trommel screens are suitable for screening of soil, compost, bark mulch, waste wood, light building rubble, municipal waste, landfill excavation & mixed construction waste. Carry a full line of trommel screens, high speed grinders, slow speed shredders, compost & foundry Equipment. Product line also includes tracked impact crushers, jaw crushers, cone crushers & tracked screens. New & used available.

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